Crampon secondary points/ Cassin Blade Runners- looking for suggestions


Original Post
Jesse Toedtman · · Unknown Hometown · Joined May 2013 · Points: 120

I just picked up a pair of second hand cassin blade runners and am curious how beneficial the secondary points are. I usually climb with Petzl Lynx in mono point configuration. With the blade runners, I see they have secondary front points.

I climb WI2-4 and barely any mixed. Will I notice a difference? Curious what everyone's opinion on secondary points is.

Here are pics for reference.

Lynx V Cassin

Lynx v Cassin II

Gunkiemike · · Unknown Hometown · Joined Jul 2009 · Points: 2,740

I'm curious as well. It looks like the little points would make it quite a bit harder to get the main point all the way into the ice. But folks seem to like these crampons. Unless I'm only reading reviews from Cassin-sponsored climbers and/or the type of folks who could cruise WI6 with salad forks on their boots.

Bill Kirby · · Baltimore Maryland · Joined Jul 2012 · Points: 480

I've had a pair Bladerunners for three seasons. The number one reason I like them is the feedback the Bladerummers provide. I think you get precise idea of what will hold and don't hold because the crampons flex a little. The secondary points work well for me and don't get in the way on mixed lines. The secondary points provide more stability.

I think you'll dig them Jesse..

Mike, I have a pair of number 1&2 Bladerunners. You're welcome to try them out this winter when we meet up. I'll wear my Stingers or Rambos or :)

RDW · · Toronto, Canada · Joined Nov 2014 · Points: 185

The secondary front points actually really help I find. Where the ice is thin, you're only engaging the main point, so they stay nimble like a mono, but in that middle ground between thin and bomber, they give just a bit more stability to foot placements than traditional monos do.

I've had mine for 2 seasons and love em...

Theriault · · Quebec, Quebec · Joined Apr 2011 · Points: 313

If you take a look at the thickness of the front point you will notice that the Cassin points is thinner than all the rest, this will do 2 things, penetrate hard ice way better but is less stable, its for this second point that the secondary points become important, they give that stability once the front point is penetrated in the ice. As for mixed terrain, the front point sticks out enough so it works as good as other poons.

Karl Henize · · June Lake, CA · Joined Aug 2013 · Points: 570

Why ask this question AFTER buying the crampons...

Wear one of each next time you go climbing and figure it out for yourself.

For the record, I think the blade runner is the best design currently available.

Theriault · · Quebec, Quebec · Joined Apr 2011 · Points: 313
Dave Schultz wrote:I'll second the opinions the Blade Runner is excellent, but I will add the stipulation that it is only on pure ice. I have found that the secondary points actually interfere significantly with my mixed climbing and when climbing alpine winter rock in boots/crampons/tools. I have also found that I DO NOT like the Blade Runner with my ski boots. SO ... if I am using my ice boots and not climbing any (sustained) rock: the Blade Runner is fantastic. The secondary points do help and the skinny main point really bites in. The crampon itself is also very rigid, making for a secure platform. If using my ski boots or climbing sustained rock, I opt for my BD Stingers. This will be my second season with the Blade Runners.
I agree, for any real alpine with a lot of walking and lots of rock I will go for my G20,s
Ryan Hamilton · · Orem · Joined Aug 2011 · Points: 20

All I can say is that you're gonna love the Blade Runner. I've been using them on ice and mixed for 2 years and about to break them out for year 3. The secondary points do add some stability. I like mono's especially in brittle ice as they seem to stick better on first kick than dual points that often shatter the ice so you have to kick in again. The the secondary points then dig in just a little, without shattering the ice, to take a little of the weight and keep things stuck in the ice. Have fun!

Karl Henize · · June Lake, CA · Joined Aug 2013 · Points: 570
Theriault wrote: I agree, for any real alpine with a lot of walking and lots of rock I will go for my G20,s
A word of caution, make sure that you have the redesigned center bar for the G20s with the slot. I had the old version of the G22. The original center bar failed due to fatigue cracking during an expedition in New Zealand. This should no longer be an issue after the redesign.
Guideline #1: Don't be a jerk.

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