5.10 Anasazi Guides or Pinks for Trad?


Original Post
Jen Wiebracht · · Lakewood, CO · Joined Jul 2015 · Points: 28

Hey MP - if you had to choose either the 5.10 Guide Anasazis or the Pinks for trad - which would you choose and WHY?

To be used from higher friction cracks of CO South Platte to splitter sandstone of UT. And occasionally for a touch of offwidth in Vedauwoo.

Priorities:
- Not make me want to cry in splitters.
- All-day comfort for long alpine days.
- Decent smearing and edging (stiff sole?).

Thanks in advance!

Mike Lofgren · · Brighton · Joined Mar 2015 · Points: 0

Same rubber. Both very sticky. Guides are definitely much stiffer. Both very comfortable. The major difference for me is #1 the upper on the Guide has some padding to it #2 the guide is slightly up-turned whereas the pinks are flat #3 the toe box on the guides is quite flat and squared off while the pink is slightly asymmetric, and better for toeing in. The pinks are a softer shoe, but I love them for edging.

I opted for the pinks. I'm a NE climber and mainly climb sport and moderate trad in NH. The pinks in street shoe size are my go to do it all shoe. Super comfortable. My other shoes (LS Miura VCS, Scarpa Feroce) are all asymmetric, aggressively down-turned, and fitted tightly (-2 street shoe). My pinks have caused me to reevaluate what I need in a shoe. My favorite shoe. Period.

Because Pinks (and Blancos) have a history of going out of production, I plan to buy 2-3 pairs to keep in the closet.

Ted Pinson · · Chicago, IL · Joined Jul 2014 · Points: 45

Based on your description, I would say the Guide is a better match. That said, the Pink is probably a better shoe, but it shines more as a performance shoe whereas the Guide is an all-day trad shoe.

http://www.gearinstitute.com/climbing/item/five-ten-anasazi-guide

Paul R · · Unknown Hometown · Joined Oct 2015 · Points: 0

I have the Guide Anasazis and can tell you why I like them. I haven't tried the Pinks though so I can't give a comparison.

I've had the Guides since June and have used them on everything from single pitch sport to long moderate trad routes. I really think they excel in the long moderate route category, and especially for crack climbing. The longest I've had them on in one day is 8 hours before I needed to take them off due to discomfort, and that was after 14 pitches of climbing. I imagine if I took them off periodically at belays I could have worn them much longer. I've done some cracks closer to my limit in the gym (5.10+) and in Lover's Leap (5.10a) and they worked awesome for both. They're incredibly comfortable for hand cracks and wider due to the stiff soles and padding inside. They're tough to get in smaller cracks since the toe box is stiff but it's manageable. For smearing, they're decent, but the stiffness makes them hard to trust for a while because you can't feel the little dimple you're standing in. I like them better for edging, they don't have the sharpest edges and are up-turned but they stick to a lot of little edges when you want them to. I can also wear socks with them without it being too tight which is a plus for cold days.

the schmuck · · Albuquerque, NM · Joined Feb 2012 · Points: 110

Jen, I have the pinks, blancos & verdes. Though I like them all, and the verdes are my trad shoe of choice, I would not use any Anasazi lace for splitters. They would perform okay, but you will destroy the laces.

Nick Drake · · Newcastle, WA · Joined Jan 2015 · Points: 438

Go try both on honestly. I thought the guide would be the ticket for easy alpine, but after trying it on that is one weird shoe. Even a half size up from street shoe it left my toes knuckled, it already has a high profile toe box and laces that run right to the rand. It really seems like a shoe that was designed with edging in mind, I want a lower profile toe for rock I'm mainly jamming. I also see those laces shredding in one day out if you're jamming, they just run way to far into the toe.

I did pick up a pair of pinks this fall, also in a half size up from street for moderate alpine and friction slab. That makes for a totally flat fit with socks and can jam thinner hands just fine. There is dead space at the heel, I'm hoping it's enough to account for swelling on grade IV routes. It's a much lower profile toe with the laces starting further back (still enough to crank down on your toes). Unfortunately all I've done lately is sport though, so I can't comment on performance yet.

GabeO · · New Haven, CT · Joined May 2006 · Points: 286
Jen W wrote:Hey MP - if you had to choose either the 5.10 Guide Anasazis or the Pinks for trad - which would you choose and WHY? To be used from higher friction cracks of CO South Platte to splitter sandstone of UT. And occasionally for a touch of offwidth in Vedauwoo. Priorities: - Not make me want to cry in splitters. - All-day comfort for long alpine days. - Decent smearing and edging (stiff sole?). Thanks in advance!
Guides, without any question. Pinks are designed for excellent edging and toe work. They put a lot of stress on the knuckle joint of your big toe, which is great for thin edging, but for cracks would be murder.

GO
Ted Pinson · · Chicago, IL · Joined Jul 2014 · Points: 45

Eh, I've climbed cracks in the Pinks and they were great. The lower profile toe makes them better for finger cracks and thin hands.

GabeO · · New Haven, CT · Joined May 2006 · Points: 286

I guess it just goes to show you, it's all about how it fits your foot. I have wide feet, and for me, I cannot imagine a worse shoe for crack climbing. It would definitely make me cry, and believe me, I have a high tolerance for foot crack pain. I will say that I have tried on the Guide, but never climbed in it.

My go-to shoe for what the OP wants would be the Sportiva TC Pro. Sounds like exactly what she wants: all-day comfort, very good crack performance and decent edging. That's the shoe I'd use for that. But again, if it doesn't fit her, all that will do no good.

GO

Lin Robinson · · Unknown Hometown · Joined Sep 2015 · Points: 30

I'd look into Mocs too if you're going to be climbing splitters. That being said, Pinks are a great all around shoe for long trad pitches.

GabeO · · New Haven, CT · Joined May 2006 · Points: 286
Lin Robinson wrote:I'd look into Mocs too if you're going to be climbing splitters.
I wear Moccs and Supermoccs, but the OP said part of her criteria were:
-----------------
- All-day comfort for long alpine days.
- Decent smearing and edging (stiff sole?).
-----------------

Moccs are neither of those things.

GO
Ted Pinson · · Chicago, IL · Joined Jul 2014 · Points: 45

Moccs are very comfortable if you don't downsize aggressively (even then, honestly) and I have seen people use 'em for big days, but yeah...stiff sole for edging, that they are not.

Guideline #1: Don't be a jerk.

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