Kong Slyde, as an alternative to the Petzl Connect Adjust


Original Post
Michael C · · New Jersey · Joined Jun 2011 · Points: 190

The Kong Slyde (less than $15 on Amazon) is a great alternative to the Petzl Connect Adjust, as it mimics its "adjustable arm."

Using a dynamic rope, you have a very safe means to clip into an anchor and create a safe, strong, redundant rappel extension.

Kong recommends a 9mm diameter rope.

I realize not everyone is into this sort of method and will continue to use the rope or slings and other means to safely secure themselves to the anchor or extend their rappel.

Kong Slyde adjustable tether

Jim Titt · · Germany · Joined Nov 2009 · Points: 0

Why bother? You can achieve the same with a karabiner, Garda Hitch, Lorenz Hitch or locking Munter. All achieve tha same effect, are cheaper and easier to adjust and it´s multi-purpose.

Michael C · · New Jersey · Joined Jun 2011 · Points: 190

Well, the $15 price is about the same as a good HMS Locking Biner for some of those hitches you mentioned.

Like I said, it's not for everyone and there are clearly alternatives. But I think this method of using a dynamic rope and a self-locking adjustable plate is a great idea and I wanted to share it as a cheaper option to the Connect Adjust.

Rock and Snow (Gunks, NY) will begin carry the Slyde and selling cut sections of a 9mm dynamic rope for this application.

Rprops · · North Las Vegas · Joined Nov 2015 · Points: 58

I am curious as to what force it would take to make the Slyde slide. Say you clip the end locker to one bolt and the slyde locker to another, climb above the anchor without unclipping and take that factor 2 all the kids are raving about. When does the Slyde release and how much will this act like a screamer/ Kong Kisa? Just my pedantic curiosity, since this is already the rig I use anyway.

eli poss · · Durango, Co · Joined May 2014 · Points: 136

Does the slyde work with ropes thinner than 9mm? I have some 8.5mm half rope that I use as a teather but it's not set up to be adjustable, so I was thinking about getting the slyde.

Jim Titt · · Germany · Joined Nov 2009 · Points: 0
Michael C wrote:Well, the $15 price is about the same as a good HMS Locking Biner for some of those hitches you mentioned. Like I said, it's not for everyone and there are clearly alternatives. But I think this method of using a dynamic rope and a self-locking adjustable plate is a great idea and I wanted to share it as a cheaper option to the Connect Adjust. Rock and Snow (Gunks, NY) will begin carry the Slyde and selling cut sections of a 9mm dynamic rope for this application.
Nice with the locking Munter is it works with almost any karabiner, any cord/rope diameter or even tape and you can adjust it both ways even if it´s out reach by clipping a sling or whatever into the blocking biner. Each to their own though!
Michael C · · New Jersey · Joined Jun 2011 · Points: 190
eli poss wrote:Does the slyde work with ropes thinner than 9mm? I have some 8.5mm half rope that I use as a teather but it's not set up to be adjustable, so I was thinking about getting the slyde.
Kong recommends 9mm.

I first tried with a 9.8, which was way too big. Pulling in slack was a little tough but it was very, very difficult to release slack.

I'm now using a 9.1 and I imagine an 8.5 working much easier (when releasing slack) but I would test it out in a safe environment first to see how it performs.
Michael C · · New Jersey · Joined Jun 2011 · Points: 190
Rprops wrote:I am curious as to what force it would take to make the Slyde slide. Say you clip the end locker to one bolt and the slyde locker to another, climb above the anchor without unclipping and take that factor 2 all the kids are raving about. When does the Slyde release and how much will this act like a screamer/ Kong Kisa? Just my pedantic curiosity, since this is already the rig I use anyway.
On their website, Kong states: "Self-locking plate Slyde (even thought it was not designed to be an "energy dissipator") it may also be used to reduce the force of impact of a fall, by acting as a shock absorber."

http://www.kong.it/en/2-products/items/f38-aid-climbing/p327-slyde

I have no idea how much force it would take to release it. I imagine it would take a tremendous fall that would probably injure someone.

But to release it, for slack, it's a lot like a loaded ATC/GiGi where you can tilt it to open it up.
Alex CV · · Greater NYC area · Joined Jun 2011 · Points: 50

Huh. I just told the guys at Rock & Snow about the Slyde less than two weeks ago when I bought some cord for it.

I haven't actually needed mine yet since I am focused on hard-for-me single pitch routes.

- Alex

baldclimber · · Ottawa, Ontario, Canada · Joined Jul 2015 · Points: 0
Alex CV wrote:Huh. I just told the guys at Rock & Snow about the Slyde less than two weeks ago when I bought some cord for it.
Static cord or dynamic rope? You should use dynamic rope to get all the benefits from a lanyard.
cmqr9001 Black · · Unknown Hometown · Joined Mar 2016 · Points: 0

Since the Garda hitch was mentioned, is it acceptable to use a Garda hitch as your main tie-in to the anchor on a multipitch climb (using lockers)? It seems like a super fast and easy way to get tied into the anchor and adjust your stance accordingly. Any safety issues with that?

eli poss · · Durango, Co · Joined May 2014 · Points: 136
cmqr9001 wrote:Since the Garda hitch was mentioned, is it acceptable to use a Garda hitch as your main tie-in to the anchor on a multipitch climb (using lockers)? It seems like a super fast and easy way to get tied into the anchor and adjust your stance accordingly. Any safety issues with that?
The garda hitch can slip, especially if you use two different size/shape biners. If you were going to use it, you would need to use two identical oval biners. A better option, if you really need something more easily adjustable than a clove would be to redirect you tie-in through the anchor and back down to a munter hitch on your belay loop. I can't imagine a situation where you would actually need to do this, though.
kevin deweese · · Oakland, Ca · Joined Jan 2007 · Points: 200

More conversation about the Slyde on the Petzl Adjust thread

http://www.mountainproject.com/v/petzl-connect-adjust/112278575

Ksween · · Wakefield, RI · Joined Jul 2011 · Points: 15
cmqr9001 wrote:Since the Garda hitch was mentioned, is it acceptable to use a Garda hitch as your main tie-in to the anchor on a multipitch climb (using lockers)? It seems like a super fast and easy way to get tied into the anchor and adjust your stance accordingly. Any safety issues with that?
Whats wrong with a clove hitch???
cmqr9001 Black · · Unknown Hometown · Joined Mar 2016 · Points: 0

^^ Nothing! I love and use the clove hitch all the time as my main tie-in to the anchor, just wondering whether the Garda would work or not. It seems the insecurity due to slippage makes it a no-go.

Ksween · · Wakefield, RI · Joined Jul 2011 · Points: 15

I would call it less than ideal. You cant use lockers in a garda hitch, the gates touching keep the carabiners from locking down. 2 non lockers with ropes twisted inside them leaves too many opportunities for failure. As long as the system stays tensioned, there wouldnt be issues, but as a personal tether, i wouldnt risk it.

percious · · Bear Creek, CO · Joined Nov 2006 · Points: 1,070

This is the system I use minus the belay device for clipping into anchors and it is used widely in Spain as well (and maybe across Europe?)

I find it extremely versatile. I believe my setup is with an 8mm static line, the same you would use for hauling and it works great. Having the adjustability is awesome.

I never used a PAS because they seemed clunky to me and all the extra loops seemed like they would get away. When not in use, the extra rope can be figure-8ed loosely to keep it out of the way.

Here I am using this in Spain:

http://www.mountainproject.com/v/108827331

I do however recommend also clove-hitching your climbing line so you have two points of connection with your anchor on multipitches, or using an extra single-length sling when cleaning a sport route. (you cant see my second tie-in point between my legs)

Look forward to seeing this setup more in the future at the crag! Thanks for introducing it!

cheers.
-chris

Michael C · · New Jersey · Joined Jun 2011 · Points: 190

Having the belay device attached (by clove hitch, or knot) is great for when you are descending via multiple rappel stations.

And if you use a dynamic rope, you're better protected if you were to slip at the anchor.

Marty C · · Unknown Hometown · Joined Aug 2008 · Points: 0

Jim,

I did a search for Lorenz hitch and came up blank.

Does this hitch have another name?
Could you give a little more detail about this hitch.

Thanks.

Jim Titt · · Germany · Joined Nov 2009 · Points: 0
Marty C wrote:Jim, I did a search for Lorenz hitch and came up blank. Does this hitch have another name? Could you give a little more detail about this hitch. Thanks.
Try "nodo di lorenzi", it´s described in Italian literature.
In practice it´s about as undesirable as the Garda Hitch, the locking Munter is however excellent and versatile especially for more traditional moving fast on long routes as you can convert bringing a second up to belayed by just clipping a karabiner.
Marty C · · Unknown Hometown · Joined Aug 2008 · Points: 0

Jim,

Thanks - I'll try searching on new name.

Guideline #1: Don't be a jerk.

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