Top Rope Anchor


Original Post
Jamesruiz123 · · Unknown Hometown · Joined Oct 2016 · Points: 0

Hey guys! Just looking for suggestions on how to build an anchor off two boulders with a static rope?
I was thinking bowline knots on both boulders and two figure eight follow throughs for the master point?

chris magness · · Unknown Hometown · Joined Oct 2010 · Points: 590

That's fine.

Or, a BHK, such as an overhand-bight-on-a-bight, is a good tool for quick, equalized master points. If your static is longer than needed, you could wrap around one boulder and clip the rope back to itself with an overhand or figure eight and create a working tail.

Cheers!

Jamesruiz123 · · Unknown Hometown · Joined Oct 2016 · Points: 0

Thank you! Sorry but what do you mean by clip the rope back to itself?

Ted Pinson · · Chicago, IL · Joined Jul 2014 · Points: 190

Just how big are these boulders? Do you really need 2? I'd probably just wrap it with a cordellette and tie a figure 8 on a bight. Redundant where it needs to be and much faster.

eli poss · · Durango, Co · Joined May 2014 · Points: 456

1 Tie a bowline on 1 boulder
2 run the line to the edge and tie a BFK over the edge
3 take the other end of the static line and tie a bowline on the other boulder

wivanoff · · Northeast, USA · Joined Mar 2012 · Points: 472
Jamesruiz123 wrote:Thank you! Sorry but what do you mean by clip the rope back to itself?
If you have a lot of rope left over, wrap the rope around the boulder once or twice. Tie a figure 8 on a bight. Use a carabiner (locking or O&O) to attach the figure 8 to the rope that goes back to your masterpoint.
Robert Michael · · Unknown Hometown · Joined Aug 2014 · Points: 116

James, please ignore the advice to use just one boulder. Always go for redundancy unless that is not possible. Your life is worth the extra time.

Ted Pinson · · Chicago, IL · Joined Jul 2014 · Points: 190

Yes, ignore the advice to build an appropriately solid anchor in the off chance that a massive seismic event manages to send a truck-sized Boulder off the cliff yet somehow miraculously doesn't pull you down with it. Redundancy is important, but not for its own sake. A second massive, unmovable Boulder or tree doesn't make you any safer. With big natural anchors, the only real need for redundancy is in the soft goods which can be cut on sharp edges. A knot accomplishes this.

eli poss · · Durango, Co · Joined May 2014 · Points: 456

The issue with only slinging 1 boulder is that it has to be directly in line with the climb otherwise the static line will swing across the edge which could potentially cut it. An additional anchor point will prevent this from happening. Other than that, a single boulder is fine, provided it's big and stable.

keithconn · · LI, NY · Joined Jan 2015 · Points: 35

OMG. Where to start!

Jamesruiz123 · · Unknown Hometown · Joined Oct 2016 · Points: 0

Thanks everyone for the advice!
Yeah I'm really big on safety and having redundancy! Sometimes I go over board with the safety but my life is more important than trying to get the anchor done quickly. I always have at least two anchors.

Robert Michael · · Unknown Hometown · Joined Aug 2014 · Points: 116

Again, ignore the advice from the obviously thin-skinned poster who will put convenience over safety.

McHull · · Fairfield, PA · Joined Aug 2012 · Points: 250
MP thread

Good luck and stay safe. Seek out in person (non interwebs) training.
keithconn · · LI, NY · Joined Jan 2015 · Points: 35

YGD!?!? I looked all over (for about 40 sec). What the hell does that mean?

Clint White aka Faulted Geologist · · Lawrence, KS · Joined Jan 2015 · Points: 158
keithconn wrote:YGD!?!? I looked all over (for about 40 sec). What the hell does that mean?
My guess is this classic:

https://m.youtube.com/watch?v=39fyTB5GGCc

One or two boulders depending on size and proximity to the climb. If u have enough rope and it makes you feel better - and it lines up better - sling em both. Boulder is a relative term. To some it means a rock they can't pick up, which isn't always big enough. If you could climb a route on it, clearly it isn't going anywhere. On the upper end, Boulder is a city.

Edit: As stated above, have an experienced anchor builder check your work until you have no further questions about the subject.
Ted Pinson · · Chicago, IL · Joined Jul 2014 · Points: 190

Lol. I'd say a boulder the size of Boulder would be ok as 1 of 5 legs on an anchor, as long as they are dynamically equalized by 2 quads.

Clint White aka Faulted Geologist · · Lawrence, KS · Joined Jan 2015 · Points: 158

Back to the OP, did u mean two fig-8 on a bight for the master point? Trying to figure out how u would do a follow through on that efficiently.

Plenty of threads on the original anchor subject, many within this Beginner heading. Google it and read up. Also, study and practice your knots extensively.

The bowline is a great safety knot, but I usually don't use it while climbing. It was my fav knot from the Scouting days some 25 years ago. A Yosemite finish on a fig-8 for the tie in is easy enough for me to remove at 135lbs, so I never converted for read.

I personally use webbing and water knots for toprope, mainly because that is how I was taught. I set very few top ropes and have webbing; because of that I continue with my setup. The new rage seems to be using static line.

Go with what you have and learn it right. Thinking you meant a figure-8 on a bight.

Blakevan · · Dallas, TX · Joined Sep 2015 · Points: 55

https://www.amazon.com/Climbing-Anchors-Climb-John-Long/dp/0762782072

This is what started me down the path of righteous anchors.

Matthew Williams 1 · · Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania · Joined Nov 2014 · Points: 85

I second picking up "Climbing Anchors." For instance, in it Long reminds us that not all boulders are good boulders. He cites the SAR method that boulders should be at least the size of fridge, but more importantly, well situated in the wall (not likely to move). Well worth the read. Be safe!

Guideline #1: Don't be a jerk.

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