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Patagonia r1 vs arc teryx fortrez


Original Post
wcayler · · Norther CA · Joined Dec 2015 · Points: 10

Has anyone used both these? I'm looking for a light layer and these seem to be two of the best. I would like to climb single and multipitch on chilly days in this jacket and also hike with out getting too warm. But also be a good layer for colder temps. What are peoples recommendation? Other jackets?

Chris Schmidt · · Fruita · Joined Nov 2012 · Points: 0

Unless you run cold look at the Cap 4 hoodie, the R1 is pretty warm. Ran Boreas looks pretty god but I have not worn it

I also really like the Marmot Driclime. Either of these will accomplish what you are looking for and cost a lot less.

Alex CV · · Greater NYC area · Joined Jun 2011 · Points: 200

I have both. The R1 has been through many iterations (I have had two versions) and some people don't like the hood design and other changes made to the latest ones (me included). Sleeves and torso are definitely longer than the Fortrez.

The Fortrez blocks wind better and on it's own without a shell it is warmer. I use it for cragging warm-ups and only climb with it on cold days, maybe mid-fifties and below.

I had a Capilene 4 Hoodie but the fit was too snug for how I want to use it (like a lighter fleece not a baselayer). I just ordered the next size up last week.

- Alex

Luc-514 · · Montreal, Quebec · Joined Nov 2006 · Points: 8,986

The Cap 4 hoody is a great base or insulating layer, completely useless exposed to the wind.

I've got the original version of the R1, pretty damn warm and snug, Patagonia wimped it out a bit over the years.

Also have the Python hoody, another flavor from Pata, it cuts wind pretty well as a standalone shell for fall use, but I don't like the full zipper or the cut of the hood, keeps falling in my eyes when wearing a helmet over it.

Will look forward to getting comments on the Arc'teryx options.

Mark Ra · · Frange, CO · Joined Feb 2014 · Points: 65

Ragged Mountain Stretch Grid Hoody - polartec power stretch waffle grid sewn in Intervale, NH for $89, less if you can catch a sale in-store. Deep chest zip, no pockets, thumbloops.

raggedmountain.com/clothing…

Melanzana Micro Grid Hoodie - No zip, unique hood design, kangaroo pocket. Sewn in Leadville, CO for $69.

melanzana.com/catalog/produ…

Most of the light layers of this type are sewn from polartec fabric and those two locally made options are actually cheaper than the big brands so for me it's a no-brainer to save money while also supporting local climbers and mountain folk.

Nick Sweeney · · Spokane, WA · Joined Jun 2013 · Points: 650

I picked up a Fortrez to use as a midlayer for ice climbing this Winter. My initial impressions are positive, but I wish the torso was cut a little slimmer. The hood on both R1 and the Fortrez works perfectly under a helmet. I got my Fortrez from REI for $100, but it is typically more expensive than the R1.

BrianVarick · · Unknown Hometown · Joined Nov 2014 · Points: 45

I just sold my Fortrez because it wasn't long enough for my 6'1" frame. I had the medium because it fit me well in the body, maybe I should have gone up to the large. I now wear a cap4 in a large and I love it. It's definitely not as warm but would be good to climb in down to probably 50. If I wanted something warmer I would try the R1 before the Fortrez. The Fortrez is definitely a high quality fleece though, and I love the built in balaclava.

Gabe B. · · Madison, WI · Joined Apr 2013 · Points: 88

I also have both. IMHO the R1 is more versatile and warmer. I found the "wind resistance" of the fortrez to be insignificant. I wear the R1 as a layer in the winter and in the alpine in the summer. If I wear it alone (not windy) I can boulder/sport climb down to about 40-50 degrees. The fortrez would leave me cold in these temps. The fortrez hood/balaclava system is better than the R1. If i could only have 1, I would get the R1. You can find it on sale much cheaper than the fortrez too because its not Arcteryx.

NickO · · Utah · Joined Apr 2011 · Points: 35

What about the OR Radiant Hybrid Hoody? Any experience with that piece?

Nolan Huther · · Clarkson University · Joined Dec 2014 · Points: 602

Patagonia recently released the "Merino Air", which I just got as a birthday present. I've only had a few pitches in it at the crag but it seems nice, comfy, pretty good fit, and fairly warm on its own. A capilene base layer underneath would probably eliminate a fleece except on colder days. It's also quite light and stretchy. It has a hood which works well great under a helmet but could also be used as a neck gaiter. Kinda pricey, but worth a look.

Quick edit- it is not a jacket, it's essentially a hooded base layer or light insulating layer

Clint White aka Faulted Geologist · · Lawrence, KS · Joined Jan 2015 · Points: 158
Mark Ra wrote:Ragged Mountain Stretch Grid Hoody - polartec power stretch waffle grid sewn in Intervale, NH for $89, less if you can catch a sale in-store. Deep chest zip, no pockets, thumbloops. raggedmountain.com/clothing… Melanzana Micro Grid Hoodie - No zip, unique hood design, kangaroo pocket. Sewn in Leadville, CO for $69. melanzana.com/catalog/produ… Most of the light layers of this type are sewn from polartec fabric and those two locally made options are actually cheaper than the big brands so for me it's a no-brainer to save money while also supporting local climbers and mountain folk.
Sweet finds! How would you describe the cut of each? I need a RAB or other thin style cut.
Nick Drake · · Newcastle, WA · Joined Jan 2015 · Points: 483

If you like the fortez fabric and want a longer cut check out the BD compound hoody. It sits well below your harness. Hood has a good cut for neck coverage when zipped. Thumb loops if you're into those.

wcayler · · Norther CA · Joined Dec 2015 · Points: 10

I ended up going with the BD compound. It has great reviews on line, it was on sale, and had a better color that I liked than the other ones mentioned. We'll see how it goes!

Guideline #1: Don't be a jerk.

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