Petzl Connect Adjust


Original Post
FourT6and2 Haftel · · San Francisco, CA · Joined Mar 2015 · Points: 5

I've been using various things for a personal anchor while sport climbing. But mostly just a long sling girth-hitched to my harness with a locker on the other end. I've also tried the typical chain-link style PAS things (like Metolius). And I gotta say, I like the Petzl Connect Adjust much more.

Sure, it's not as lightweight as a sling, but the fact that it's instantly and infinitely adjustable in the blink of an eye makes it much more valuable to me.

Y'all can look it up, but it's basically a short length of dynamic rope attached to a mini self-locking belay device of sorts. It locks up in the same way an ATC Guide or Petzl Reverso would lock in guide mode. And you girth-hitch it to your harness just like you would any of the other systems.

But you get to the top of your climb and simply clip this thing to the anchor or bolt and pull in the slack a bit. Done. And you can release it to lengthen your anchor or pull it to shorten. It works really smooth. And unlike the PAS type of designs, you don't need to mess with a carabiner or unclip or open a gate to shorten or lengthen yourself.

Can't use it as an actual anchor to belay or climb on (like the Metolius PAS). But I don't know many people who actually do that anyway.

It also stows away on your harness better than a PAS. I have one end girth-hitched to my belay loop and the locker just clips to my harness wherever. And I tuck the slack under my leg loop. So when I'm climbing, it's not dangling around. And when I want to use it, I just grab the locker like a quick draw and pull. Easy.

This is actually a piece of gear I'm glad I bought and don't mind carrying. Nice design!

Kurt G. · · Reading, PA · Joined Nov 2012 · Points: 85

I use a Sterling rope Purcell prusik.

http://mediacdn.shopatron.com/media/mfg/735/product_image/thm/t440_ee8bd438182b394bd6e761011998a956.jpg?1419025820

great adjustability, dynamic rope, lightweight, compact.

the best part, theyre about $10 a piece, compared to $50 for the petzl.

kevin deweese · · Oakland, Ca · Joined Jan 2007 · Points: 200

Lol,

I use the Petzl Evolv Adjust for aid climbing and I cannot imagine anyone thinking for even a moment that the Petzl Connect "stows away on your harness better than a PAS or anything else.

Considering my Evolvs use thinner rope, I can't even imagine how bulky the extra cord must be when using the thicker rope used in the Connect.

I've used purcell prussics before and didn't stick with them because of their bulky nature and I'd happily marry the purcell if it meant I could kill the connect (and F the Evolv, yum!)

FourT6and2 Haftel · · San Francisco, CA · Joined Mar 2015 · Points: 5

I don't really know how you're stowing a PAS or whatever you use, but how I do it:

I adjust it so the rope is pulled all the way out of the locking device. Then clip the locker to my harness like a quick draw. Then I tuck the extra length of rope under my leg loop. Seems to be out of the way and isn't bulky at all.

But hey, I'm not forcing you to like it lol. This is just my findings on it.

A PAS is way more bulky to me. The chain-link nature of it means it doesn't really coil up or anything. You have to double it up once or even twice on a carabiner to get it out of the way. And that is more bulky to me. But whatever, do what you want man.

A simple sling with a carabiner on it is definitely less bulky than any of 'em. But a sling isn't adjustable.

I kinda do it like this. But I tuck the extra a little wider so it isn't dangling.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=RY5PlN69vdw

FourT6and2 Haftel · · San Francisco, CA · Joined Mar 2015 · Points: 5
Kurt G. wrote:I use a Sterling rope Purcell prusik. mediacdn.shopatron.com/medi... great adjustability, dynamic rope, lightweight, compact. the best part, theyre about $10 a piece, compared to $50 for the petzl.
So what's the range of adjustability with that? The Connect Adjust's range goes from 30" extended to putting you right against the anchor/bolt if you wanted (but would probably never do). With a Purcell Prusik, isn't your adjustability is limited by the loop you create (can't go tighter than half the length of the loop)? So let's say you make one that's 30 inches long to match the Connect Adjust. You can't make it shorter than 15 inches. Not a lot of flexibility there.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=jWE9bGTgagU

Maybe another alternative is just using a single length of rope (similar to the Connect Adjust) and then just clove hitching it to a locking carabiner with stopper knots in the ends. Would accomplish the same thing as the Petzl, but would require a bit more fiddling to adjust it. The Connect Adjust is really quick and easy to adjust as shown here. A clove hitch... not so much. But if you don't want to spend the money, and you have a length of rope laying around, sure why not.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=k0uNW1F-UJo

In terms of bulk, it's lighter than a quick draw and takes up the same, if not less, space. So I don't really see that as a real concern. But if you are watching every gram of weight, so be it.





Price? Sure, I'll concede the Petzl thing does come at a premium. I got mine for $40. But I'm rich, so maybe quit dirtbagging and get a job, you dirty hippy!

But again... this is, "all just... like my opinion, man." So do whatever you want. :)
Noah Yetter · · Lakewood, CO · Joined Jul 2015 · Points: 10
Kurt G. wrote:I use a Sterling rope Purcell prusik. mediacdn.shopatron.com/medi... great adjustability, dynamic rope, lightweight, compact. the best part, theyre about $10 a piece, compared to $50 for the petzl.
Are you sure that's dynamic? It looks like it's just 6mm cord, and Sterling's site doesn't say any different... sterlingrope.com/c/arbor_se...;ckey=1114759.1131947.1114348.0.0
NeilB · · Tehachapi, CA · Joined Apr 2014 · Points: 30

Just dropping in to say that whatever I'm doing is infinitely more clever, thrifty, and original than this. Oxford commas are my thing.

JeffMK · · Unknown Hometown · Joined Feb 2011 · Points: 160

The Connect Adjust definitely seems like a great solution, but as previously mentioned, expensive.

Any thoughts or experience with the Kong Slyde as much cheaper alternative?

Slyde

Kong Slyde

duggk · · arlington · Joined Dec 2015 · Points: 0

i use a kong slyde, it's not as smooth as the petzl to release but pulling it in tighter works fine. i'm happy for the price

Brian L. · · Unknown Hometown · Joined Feb 2016 · Points: 0

What, exactly, is the need for all this adjust-ability when cleaning sport routes?

All you need is something that puts you a comfortable distance from the anchor while cleaning. This really doesn't change.

Aid climbing is another matter, but OP specifically mentioned sport.

FourT6and2 Haftel · · San Francisco, CA · Joined Mar 2015 · Points: 5
NeilB wrote:Just dropping in to say that whatever I'm doing is infinitely more clever, thrifty, and original than this. Oxford commas are my thing.
I freakin' love Oxford commas. :D

JeffMK wrote:The Connect Adjust definitely seems like a great solution, but as previously mentioned, expensive. Any thoughts or experience with the Kong Slyde as much cheaper alternative? Slyde
Never seen that one. But at first glance, it sort of replicates what a clove hitch on a biner would do? Maybe easier to adjust than a clove, but as you say, not as smooth as the Petzl.

You're basically paying a bit more for the Petzl, but in return you're getting more convenience.

Brian L. wrote:What, exactly, is the need for all this adjust-ability when cleaning sport routes? All you need is something that puts you a comfortable distance from the anchor while cleaning. This really doesn't change. Aid climbing is another matter, but OP specifically mentioned sport.
Umm... is that not the point?

You ask what the need is for adjustability, then you say all one needs is something that puts you in a comfortable position. Do you not see the contradiction there? The point of the Connect Adjust and other adjustable lanyards is they put one in a comfortable position quickly and easily via adjustability. Not every route has anchor bolts the same distance apart or the same distance from a comfortable foot stance. I just went climbing in Switzerland last week and the bolting style there is a little different than where I live in California. And every route is going to have a different belay stance or anchor stance. So yeah... adjustability is awesome to have. Plus... not everyone is the same height. I'm 6' 2". My climbing partner is 5' 8". We aren't going to both have the same stance at an anchor. So being able to adjust your personal anchor is a huge plus! It's really about comfort.

Additionally, not every route is a single-pitch, sport route. Lots of multi-pitch sport routes to be had as well. And a personal anchor that is super smooth, fast, easy, and simple to adjust goes a long way. Especially when belaying the second. Yeah, I know you can build your anchor with the climbing rope. I do that as well. But having an easily adjustable personal makes the process smoother across the board.

One could argue that climbers got along just fine for decades without some fancy schmancy adjustable laynard. True. Climbers also got along just fine without other advances in tech as well (like comfortable harnesses, quick draws, locking carabiners, better rubber on your feet, and so on).

In any event, this was just my review of the thing. I'm not really trying to convince you to go out and buy one. But if you're already considering something like this, all I can say is it works well and I'm glad I got it.

Oh, also... you can use it to extend your rappel, while still maintaining your connection to the anchor:

Brian L. · · Unknown Hometown · Joined Feb 2016 · Points: 0
FourT6and2 wrote: Umm... isn't that the point? You ask what the need is for adjustability, then you say all you need is something that puts you in a comfortable position. Do you not see the contradiction there?
No I don't. A comfortable distance to the anchor is always the same, based on my reach. Being able to extend farther out is nice (and easily accomplished for less), but you specifically sold this as being able to adjust to "zero". I don't see the point.

FourT6and2 wrote: Plus... not everyone is the same height. I'm 6' 2". My climbing partner is 5' 8". We aren't going to both have the same stance at an anchor. So being able to adjust your personal anchor is a huge plus!
Not getting this one. Are you giving the tether for your partner to use? They don't have their own?

FourT6and2 wrote: Additionally, not every route is a single-pitch sport route. Lots of multi-pitch sport routes to be had as well. And a personal anchor that is super smooth, fast, easy, and simple to adjust goes a long way.
Sorry, I see zero need for a separate adjustable tether here. The rope and a clove hitch serves that purpose at belays (and is arguably "safer" - not that I think your tether is unsafe - and just as quick).

BTW, I'm fine with this device if that's what you want to use, and spend your money on. I just don't understand the huge emphasis a lot of people put on having a super, infinitely adjustable system.
FourT6and2 Haftel · · San Francisco, CA · Joined Mar 2015 · Points: 5

Well that's fine, man. You don't have to get one lol. There's no point in me trying to argue with you as your mind is already made up. Me? I like the thing and I'm happy I got it. :) Because no... not every anchor has the same stance and not every stance puts you at the same distance from the anchor. That's my experience. If yours is different, so be it.

Kurt G. · · Reading, PA · Joined Nov 2012 · Points: 85
FourT6and2 wrote: So what's the range of adjustability with that? The Connect Adjust's range goes from 30" extended to putting you right against the anchor/bolt if you wanted (but would probably never do). With a Purcell Prusik, isn't your adjustability is limited by the loop you create (can't go tighter than half the length of the loop)? So let's say you make one that's 30 inches long to match the Connect Adjust. You can't make it shorter than 15 inches. Not a lot of flexibility there.
yes you do get more flexibility with the connect but ive never been left wanting more adjustability with my Purcell. ive always been able to find the sweet spot for clipping anchors.
FourT6and2 Haftel · · San Francisco, CA · Joined Mar 2015 · Points: 5
Kurt G. wrote: yes you do get more flexibility with the connect but ive never been left wanting more adjustability with my Purcell. ive always been able to find the sweet spot for clipping anchors.
I've never used a Purcell Prusik. So I can't really argue with that. But I have this thing and I'll be sticking with it unless I decide having an extra 20 grams on my harness is holding me back from sending that totally sweet 5.10b lol.
Kurt G. · · Reading, PA · Joined Nov 2012 · Points: 85
Noah Yetter wrote: Are you sure that's dynamic? It looks like it's just 6mm cord, and Sterling's site doesn't say any different... sterlingrope.com/c/arbor_se...;ckey=1114759.1131947.1114348.0.0
perhaps dynamic was the wrong term to use. it has the highest energy absorption potential of all the commonly used anchor tether options.

read the last paragraph of this climbing magazine article, this is what helped me decide to use them.... climbing.com/skills/anchors...
Kurt G. · · Reading, PA · Joined Nov 2012 · Points: 85
FourT6and2 wrote: I've never used a Purcell Prusik. So I can't really argue with that. But I have this thing and I'll be sticking with it unless I decide having an extra 20 grams on my harness is holding me back from sending that totally sweet 5.10b lol.
don't get me wrong, im all for the connect adjust, im just letting everyone know all the options out there, same as you. mine does have a price point advantage which is why I posted it.

EDIT: I will say I use 2 purcells for redundancy and simplicity for climbing sport anchors. not sure if youre using one or two of the connects.
FourT6and2 Haftel · · San Francisco, CA · Joined Mar 2015 · Points: 5
Kurt G. wrote: don't get me wrong, im all for the connect adjust, im just letting everyone know all the options out there, same as you. mine does have a price point advantage which is why I posted it.
Oh totally. No dissent from me :)
baldclimber · · Ottawa, Ontario, Canada · Joined Jul 2015 · Points: 0
Brian L. wrote: Sorry, I see zero need for a separate adjustable tether here. The rope and a clove hitch serves that purpose at belays (and is arguably "safer" - not that I think your tether is unsafe - and just as quick).
Agreed, the rope with cloves is the simplest at belays. OTOH, for multi-pitch rappels a fixed length tether such as the Beal Dynaconnexion has served me well. However, I've started using an adjustable tether (Kong Slyde) for multi-pitch rappels on local sport routes. Quite a few of the more recently developed routes have oddly placed rap anchors. Some are at waist height, some at the limit of my reach above me. So quite useful for my local areas.
Apparently the Kong Slyde setup is popular among sport climbers in Spain.
Karl Henize · · Bellingham, WA · Joined Aug 2013 · Points: 415

I own the dual connect adjust. Overall, I think the slider design is the best available for a PAS. However, there are other aspects of the design that could be significantly improved. In my opinion, the rope diameter used (9.5mm) is overkill. I lead climb and take falls on skinner ropes...

When climbing with a full trad rack, I find the extra bulk and dangly bits annoying. 

Michael C · · New Jersey · Joined Jun 2011 · Points: 190

This past weekend my partner was using the Connect Adjust and I got interested in getting one for myself. But after taking a look at the Kong Slyde, I went ahead an ordered one for less than $15. I can sacrifice a few feet off of my old 9.8 rope to build the tether. I think that's the only big difference (besides price) between the Connect and Slyde, how Petzl provides this fancy bartacked tether for girth hitching.

Anyone who uses the Slyde, any tips, lessons, recommendations? Thanks!

Guideline #1: Don't be a jerk.

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