Crags are NOT Dog Parks


Original Post
Curtis Baird · · Unknown Hometown · Joined Oct 2013 · Points: 156

I was climbing up at Hidden Valley yesterday. I saw at least 5 unleashed dogs and at one point there were more dogs than people at a wall. All day I had dogs walking on my rope and every time I tried to eat I would have a group of dogs around me. Not to mention there was dog crap everywhere. The answer to this problem is simple. People either need to not bring their dog or keep them leashed were they cannot bother anyone and pick up after them. I feel like this is obvious.

t.farrell · · New York, NY · Joined Aug 2016 · Points: 0

As part of this week's weekly dog reminder, I'd also like to request that poorly behaved humans not bring their poorly behaved dogs to the gym.

BigB · · Red Rock, NV · Joined Feb 2015 · Points: 5

I wish all my dawgs would quit bringing their ill behaved humans to the crag, I mean with all the trash, TP, radios, obnoxious beta, and bolts you'd think it was a gym or something...... w00f

don'tchuffonme · · Unknown Hometown · Joined Jan 2014 · Points: 0

This will accomplish nothing. People will continue to bring their dogs and let them off leash, and people will continue to passive-aggressively post on MP after the fact. You want these people to think twice? Pepper spray. Yeah, I know, I know, not the dog's fault, etc. etc. I think this is the simple answer you're looking for.

Brian L. · · Unknown Hometown · Joined Feb 2016 · Points: 0
Curtis Baird wrote:The answer to this problem is simple. People either need to not bring their dog or keep them leashed were they cannot bother anyone and pick up after them.
You're thinking about this all wrong. You can't modify other's behavior by posting on the internet. Most likely they aren't reading this, or don't think it applied to THEIR dog.

The solution is bring a bunch of leashes and tie them up yourself. Then confront the (probably pissed off) owners. That'll teach 'em.
Christopher Gibson · · Unknown Hometown · Joined Feb 2012 · Points: 0

Or maybe pepper spray the owners instead of the dogs? I dont't know.

McLovin · · Unknown Hometown · Joined Feb 2016 · Points: 130

life is gonna be hard if you cant handle a few pups running around.
Pepper spray my dog for anything less than a bite and I will put you in the hospital without hesitation.

Nolan Huther · · Clarkson University · Joined Dec 2014 · Points: 567

Just to any inhumane, immoral excuse of a human being that would actually consider pepper spraying a dog (which I hope is not the case here), dogs have extremely sensitive sinus glands, orders of magnitude more powerful than humans, and doing so would essentially eradicate them, and they would lose their sense of smell for the rest of their lives, and doing so qualifies as animal cruelty. It is not a simple reprimand for whatever behavior you consider annoying. I've had a mouthful of bear spray once in the wind and I nearly vomitted. I cannot imagine the excruciating pain that a dog would endure in such a situation where it was blatantly sprayed. So maybe instead of even suggesting such a brutally severe action, even in light, maybe just make a polite and rational request to the owners next time?

Russ Keane · · Unknown Hometown · Joined Feb 2013 · Points: 90

Rock climbing is an OUTDOOR activity, and furthermore, it's out in the wilderness far, far away from towns and civilizations. You can keep dogs out of restaurants and grocery stores --- but guess what -- out in the woods fair is fair.

If you want to go climbing out in the woods, deal with a few pups running around being healthy and enjoying life. Stop trying to control every single aspect of all moments of your life. We win this argument. You don;t own the woods.

Bill Kirby · · Baltimore Maryland · Joined Jul 2012 · Points: 40
Nolan Huther wrote:Just to any inhumane, immoral excuse of a human being that would actually consider pepper spraying a dog (which I hope is not the case here), dogs have extremely sensitive sinus glands, orders of magnitude more powerful than humans, and doing so would essentially eradicate them, and they would lose their sense of smell for the rest of their lives, and doing so qualifies as animal cruelty. It is not a simple reprimand for whatever behavior you consider annoying. I've had a mouthful of bear spray once in the wind and I nearly vomitted. I cannot imagine the excruciating pain that a dog would endure in such a situation where it was blatantly sprayed. So maybe instead of even suggesting such a brutally severe action, even in light, maybe just make a polite and rational request to the owners next time?
But it's OK to pepper spray a bear? Hypocrite

Edit: come on guys don't take pepper spray troll bait! I know it's Monday but..
Curtis Baird · · Unknown Hometown · Joined Oct 2013 · Points: 156
Russ Keane wrote:Rock climbing is an OUTDOOR activity, and furthermore, it's out in the wilderness far, far away from towns and civilizations. You can keep dogs out of restaurants and grocery stores --- but guess what -- out in the woods fair is fair. If you want to go climbing out in the woods, deal with a few pups running around being healthy and enjoying life. Stop trying to control every single aspect of all moments of your life. We win this argument. You don;t own the woods.
You are correct, I do not own the land. Here are some guidelines recommend by the Access Fund.

mountainproject.com/v/crag-...
Kurt G. · · Reading, PA · Joined Nov 2012 · Points: 85

I agree its fine to have dogs at the crag but please don't bring them if you cant control them. I can deal with some annoyances like barking and peeing and such but when your dog is rooting through my pack or the worst is being on my rope while I have someone on the wall, im going to get pissed. I would never to resort to anything like pepper spray (which I think was trolling) but don't be surprised if I shove your dog off my rope, my leader takes priority.
just make sure you can control your dog before you bring them out.

Jon Frisby · · Brooklyn, NY · Joined Feb 2013 · Points: 25
Russ Keane wrote:Rock climbing is an OUTDOOR activity, and furthermore, it's out in the wilderness far, far away from towns and civilizations. You can keep dogs out of restaurants and grocery stores --- but guess what -- out in the woods fair is fair. If you want to go climbing out in the woods, deal with a few pups running around being healthy and enjoying life. Stop trying to control every single aspect of all moments of your life. We win this argument. You don;t own the woods.
If your dog steps on my rope and I shortrope my partner I will literally punch you in the face - there are actual safety concerns with dogs at the crag. Being outside does not give you carte blanche to allow your dog to do whatever it wants while you climb some 2 pitch 5.6 for 3 hours
Russ Keane · · Unknown Hometown · Joined Feb 2013 · Points: 90

"You are correct, I do not own the land. Here are some guidelines recommend by the Access Fund."

That's fine. Did you read the suggestions? Nowhere does it say dogs are not welcome, keep them at home. It says be reasonable and make sure your dog is cool before it can come hang at the crag. How about you as a human be reasonable? Obviously if the dog is causing dangerous things, like sitting on a flaked rope under a lead climb, or scaring people, you would have cause to be upset. But walking around, hanging out, playing, how is this a concern?

Brian Payst · · Carrboro,NC · Joined Jan 2014 · Points: 0
Russ Keane wrote:Rock climbing is an OUTDOOR activity, and furthermore, it's out in the wilderness far, far away from towns and civilizations. You can keep dogs out of restaurants and grocery stores --- but guess what -- out in the woods fair is fair. If you want to go climbing out in the woods, deal with a few pups running around being healthy and enjoying life. Stop trying to control every single aspect of all moments of your life. We win this argument. You don;t own the woods.
Actually, in this case we do own the woods and this crag is not exactly in the wilderness given the road a few hundred feet away. Even in the wilderness, there are rules that govern usage (dogs are generally not allowed in publicly managed wilderness areas). The CCC negotiated and paid for the land as well as the new parking area and we do have a full fledged climbing management plan in the works. In the interim, please see our web site for info and updates

We recommend that you do not bring your dog to Hidden Valley as there are other dogs in the area already and potential for conflicts. Should you choose to bring your dog, please keep it leashed and under control at all times and clean up after them. Show some simple courtesy to your fellow climbers and we can all get along.
Curtis Baird · · Unknown Hometown · Joined Oct 2013 · Points: 156
Russ Keane wrote:"You are correct, I do not own the land. Here are some guidelines recommend by the Access Fund." That's fine. Did you read the suggestions? Nowhere does it say dogs are not welcome, keep them at home. It says be reasonable and make sure your dog is cool before it can come hang at the crag. How about you as a human be reasonable? Obviously if the dog is causing dangerous things, like sitting on a flaked rope under a lead climb, or scaring people, you would have cause to be upset. But walking around, hanging out, playing, how is this a concern?
I never said dogs were not welcome nor that dogs just hanging out were an issue. I love dogs, I have two. But why should I be the one to have to try to get someone else's dog off my rope? It is not my responsibility to discipline a dog that does not belong to me.
mediocre · · Unknown Hometown · Joined Jul 2013 · Points: 0

Pepper spray! Pepper spray those bitches.

A. Michael · · Unknown Hometown · Joined Jul 2016 · Points: 0

I've found that petting the dogs usually works. They mostly just want to say hi, make friends, etc, then they go on about their dog business. Plus, by making friends with the dogs, their owners are more likely to respond positively to a polite request to leash them if the dogs continue to walk on your rope, snoop through your lunch, etc. I've had dog owners ask our party if we would prefer their dog leashed after I've spent time petting the dogs, asking their names, and on.

Many wilderness areas, and especially parks and preserves, will have some sort of leash ordinance which is roundly ignored. I think it would be cruel and hateful to pepper spray any animal that isn't threatening. But if you attack someone for pepper spraying your unleashed dog, you could very likely be charged with assault, and your dog could suffer a worse fate.

Let's just all be nice to each other instead.

Colonel Mustard · · Sacramento, CA · Joined Sep 2005 · Points: 1,055

Hehehe... The time honored troll.

Most people don't keep an eye on their dog(s) the way they should in every other situation, much less at the crag. I'm a dog owner, but I'll hardly (if ever) bring my pooch to the crag. Not only can't I keep an eye on my dog the way I should, who knows what asshole dog the next dog owner is going to bring? Now I'm up 60' cruxing out and there's a dog fight brewing below with all the dog/human hostility that accompanies that situation? No thanks.

Curtis Baird · · Unknown Hometown · Joined Oct 2013 · Points: 156

In regards to the initial post being related to Hidden Valley, the CCC owns the land and their website states, "We strongly recommend leaving your pet at home. If you do bring your dog, please be sure to keep it leashed and under control at all times, be sure your pet has plenty of food and water and is safely out of the way of other climbers. No one wants to step in dog waste, so pack accordingly and clean up after your pet and pack it out." This is not asking too much, it is about respecting others and the land.

bruno-cx · · Unknown Hometown · Joined Oct 2009 · Points: 0

A dog that I call "rape collie" frequents one my local crags, without fail it won't stop ass fucking all of the other dogs at the crag all day long. I'd rather hear barking dogs than have to watch a doggy orgy train wreck unfold.

Guideline #1: Don't be a jerk.

Post a Reply

Log In to Reply