Maxi Climber - anybody have one? opinions?


Original Post
brian n · · Manchester, WA · Joined Sep 2016 · Points: 91

So, what do you think? (Regardless of whether you own one.)
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=kvS4KnC8BcM

Steve Pulver · · Williston, ND · Joined Dec 2003 · Points: 455

Don't have one, I've used similar climbing machines in gyms a couple of times. If you're trying to improve aerobic fitness, I don't think its any better or any worse than just using a stair climber or other aerobic machine. If youre trying to use it to improve your climbing grade I expect it's somewhere between having no effect to having a negative effect (I'm basing this on the Anderson bros. argument that anything that increases leg mass including muscle has a negative effect on your climbing, coupled with my argument, it reinforces bad technique)

Lee Durbetaki · · Unknown Hometown · Joined Apr 2016 · Points: 5

If you can add muscle mass to your legs using that thing, you're either completely detrained or very creative.

brian n · · Manchester, WA · Joined Sep 2016 · Points: 91

From what I know after years of competitive cycling, one can add strength without adding mass with any piece of exercise equipment. Depends on how you use it.

Steve Pulver wrote: it reinforces bad technique)
Interesting, could you elaborate some?
jaredj · · Unknown Hometown · Joined Jan 2013 · Points: 165

The lawyer character in the movie "K2" had one in his office, so there's that.

Steve Pulver · · Williston, ND · Joined Dec 2003 · Points: 455

As far as technique, I thought it encourages you to have your hips facing straight in, instead of turned out.

I guess I never figured out how to add strength without mass. I've never been at a competitive level at any sport, in any sense of the word. I've done a lot of.recreational fitness activities my entire life. I followed the rock prodigy advice about two years ago and cut out all running, about 95% of my cycling and 95â„… of my lower body strength exercises, and I've seen a large reduction in my leg size. I attribute all of my gains in climbing ability to their program, and probably would rank this advice to cutout lower body exercises as one of the top five things I would recommend to any climber trying to improve. (I guess you can tell I'm a fan. Despite having tried many forms of training to improve my climbing over 25 years I was pretty much always at what I would call a 5.9/5.10 level climber. It seems hard for me to believe, but I think I would call myself a 5.12 climber now, and the 12's I've done have also felt so easy, I'm not even 100â„… sure that's what my level is.)

Eric Lutz · · Unknown Hometown · Joined Sep 2014 · Points: 180

I'd love to get my hands on one, find a way to angle it back past vertical and change the hands out to a set of rock rings, that may have some affect on training!

SMarsh · · NY, NY · Joined Sep 2013 · Points: 3

Before the Maxi Climber (or maybe at the same time) there was the Versa Climber.

For the Versa Climber, the "gym model" offered resistance but was only sold to gyms. The "personal model" was lacking in resistance, and it was really useless. We sent it back after ordering and finding out that there were two different models.

I think the previous poster's criticism about hip position is accurate and apt.

Mike McKinnon · · Golden, CO · Joined Aug 2003 · Points: 65
Steve Pulver wrote:As far as technique, I thought it encourages you to have your hips facing straight in, instead of turned out. I guess I never figured out how to add strength without mass. I've never been at a competitive level at any sport, in any sense of the word. I've done a lot of.recreational fitness activities my entire life. I followed the rock prodigy advice about two years ago and cut out all running, about 95% of my cycling and 95â„… of my lower body strength exercises, and I've seen a large reduction in my leg size. I attribute all of my gains in climbing ability to their program, and probably would rank this advice to cutout lower body exercises as one of the top five things I would recommend to any climber trying to improve. (I guess you can tell I'm a fan. Despite having tried many forms of training to improve my climbing over 25 years I was pretty much always at what I would call a 5.9/5.10 level climber. It seems hard for me to believe, but I think I would call myself a 5.12 climber now, and the 12's I've done have also felt so easy, I'm not even 100â„… sure that's what my level is.)
Its called myofibular hypertrophy.
brian n · · Manchester, WA · Joined Sep 2016 · Points: 91
Steve Pulver wrote:I guess I never figured out how to add strength without mass.
High reps - low weight
In cycling, spinning would be the technique. In high school, the basketball team used a "jumper" or "jump machine". A padded cradle went over your shoulders that gave resistance. You would squat then jump fast and hard repeatedly against it. We also did high rep, low weight on all the lifting equipment. We were lean and strong.
It may also be easier for some body types to benefit from this sort of activity.
Mike McKinnon · · Golden, CO · Joined Aug 2003 · Points: 65

no really. That is not how you add strength. That is how you increase small muscle endurance. If you want to add strength without putting on mass, look up myofibular hypertrophy. This is what powerlifters/olympic liftres do to stay in wieght class while increasing stength. It is heavy weight low reps. Reps <5. Look it up it is a well known well studied physiology.

brian n · · Manchester, WA · Joined Sep 2016 · Points: 91

I am not a sports physiologist, but I did stay at a Holiday Inn Express last night. ;)
Seriously though, it sounds like those bodybuilders are shooting for pure unadulterated strength, sans endurance. For general climbing I don’t think that is what you want. Although the examples I gave are anecdotal, I stand by them because I’ve seen them work for me and others in 5 years as a competitive road racing cyclist. I had a 25 mile time trial personal best time of 58:57 while working a full-time job. Not to shabby.

jaredj · · Unknown Hometown · Joined Jan 2013 · Points: 165

Two things

1. I think you mean miles, not km. Nobody here cares if you are a decent Cat 3 or 4.

2. You are using the terms strength and endurance somewhat loosely / cavalierly in this thread and that's why people are arguing with you. It seems like you don't have very precise definitions of these. What I think you're talking about in this thread is muscular endurance. That's a major factor in TTing in the road cycling world, and is also a core element of going hard uphill during alpine climbing - analogous to the concept of FTP people with power meters use. The versa climber might help in this regard. But to say that it's due to strength that comes without mass sounds willfully ignorant of some basics of physiology. It's the nexus of strength and the aerobic system. I'm not a physiologist either but I have read a few things. A couple of chapters in Joe Friel's training bible or Training for the New Alpinism by Scott and Johnston lays out these definitions / concepts / distinctions. It'll be hard to have conversations with Internet strangers on these topics without a little more precision.

JK- · · SLC · Joined Nov 2012 · Points: 58
Steve Pulver wrote: I guess I never figured out how to add strength without mass.
Couple suggestions of varying quality a few posts above... But it's also worth nothing that it is much harder for some people to add strength without mass. And some people have trouble adding mass. And others have trouble adding definition. Etc
brian n · · Manchester, WA · Joined Sep 2016 · Points: 91

To jaredj,

You are right. I didn't "define my terms" sufficiently. Its the first rule of philosophy and applicable in any debate. Also, it was a 25 mile TT. And...NOBODY cares if I was a decent category 3 cyclist; ouch! I'm just being facetious now. I think I'll stop before someone harps on my poor punctuation, sentence structure, or articulation.

P.S. I sold my treadmill and bought a Maxi Climber. I guess I will let you know.

Mike McKinnon · · Golden, CO · Joined Aug 2003 · Points: 65
brian n wrote:I am not a sports physiologist, but I did stay at a Holiday Inn Express last night. ;) Seriously though, it sounds like those bodybuilders are shooting for pure unadulterated strength, sans endurance. For general climbing I don’t think that is what you want. Although the examples I gave are anecdotal, I stand by them because I’ve seen them work for me and others in 5 years as a competitive road racing cyclist. I had a 25 mile time trial personal best time of 58:57 while working a full-time job. Not to shabby.
You dont even know me.

Climbing is not cycling. If you do indeed climb at the level your profile says more endurance work is not what you need. You need strength and power without mass. That is what myofibular hypertrohy does. Dont ask me read a book - Anderson Brothers, Horst et al. Snark will only keep you a 5.9 climber.
Stiles · · the Mountains · Joined May 2003 · Points: 840

As mentioned very early on, the guy in the movie 'K2' had one of these in his office. He totally killed it with the ladies AND climbed a sick bigwall route on K2!
I want to do that... I don't know about climbing K2, though.

brian n · · Manchester, WA · Joined Sep 2016 · Points: 91
Mike McKinnon wrote: You dont even know me.
Sorry, I did not intend to attack you in any way. I also was not being snarky. Just trying throw in a little sarcasm to keep it "light"

To refocus the discussion a bit; will this machine add mass? will it make you "stronger", in the generic laymen's meaning of the word strong? will I able to climb a bit harder route perhaps? or climb a little longer route? That is the real discussion here.

Lee Durbetaki wrote: If you can add muscle mass to your legs using that thing, you're either completely detrained or very creative.
I think I agree with that.
This too.

Stiles wrote: He totally killed it with the ladies AND climbed a sick bigwall route on K2!
Mike McKinnon · · Golden, CO · Joined Aug 2003 · Points: 65
brian n wrote: will I able to climb a bit harder route perhaps? or climb a little longer route?
No and No.

Aerobic capacity has very little to do with actual climbing. I think it helps a little with the clearing of lactic acid and recovery at rest stances but a lot smarter people than me think it has not bearing on climbing performance (anderson bros.).

If you want to climb harder you need to actually climb. You need to be more precise in your language (since that is what you need to be). Climbing harder equates to Power, Power Endurance and Strength. In climbing, this translates to campusing and the like for power, PE is trained by 4x4s and the like, and strength is max hangs on a fingerboard or max limit bouldering. Each one is very specific and targets a specific physiological pathway in your body.

If you want to climb longer on super easy routes, like 5.6 and 5.7 for you, general fitness will help a little but long days on the rock will help more.

Take your pick but the Maxi climber won't help you get better at climbing unless you are overweight and this helps you lose that added body mass.
aikibujin · · Castle Rock, CO · Joined Oct 2014 · Points: 290
brian n wrote:P.S. I sold my treadmill and bought a Maxi Climber. I guess I will let you know.
Any update on your self experiment?
Gilman Coryell · · Mount Vernon, Maine · Joined Jun 2012 · Points: 65
jaredj wrote:The lawyer character in the movie "K2" had one in his office, so there's that.
Sold!
Guideline #1: Don't be a jerk.

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