Need some Beta on Hood


Original Post
Ben Ambrose · · Unknown Hometown · Joined Apr 2016 · Points: 0

Need alittle Beta for Mt. Hood. Hitting the mountain on November 12th with a team of 3 total. Will I need ice screws if so what sizes, will I need a half rope?

Chris C. · · Seattle, WA · Joined Mar 2016 · Points: 81

+1 on beta

Would love to know what routes tend to be in during late fall and early winter.

George W · · Unknown Hometown · Joined Sep 2015 · Points: 3

By which route?!?

Ben Ambrose · · Unknown Hometown · Joined Apr 2016 · Points: 0

Southwest is my ideal route. But I'm open to suggestions.

George W · · Unknown Hometown · Joined Sep 2015 · Points: 3

I'll assume you're referring to the standard, south side route. There's not a southwest route. Do not go west around crater rock due to increased avalanche danger on that side of the crater. The west crater rim is best in mid spring. I mention this because it's the closest thing to a SW route.

I'll also assume that you've found the excellent beta here on this website. So, to answer your question, the mountain is receiving good snow for the foreseeable future. So, you probably won't find a place for screws on the standard route, but its fine to bring one or two (just in case). If you want to bring protection, it should be a small rope and pickets. Don't travel above the bergshrund roped up without placing good pro--that's how everybody dies.

Your protection is not of great concern, as the south side is a walk-up with one crevasse, the bergshrund, and it's usually avoidable. Your greatest concern is the weather forecast. If you lose visibility, the fall line will take you to Zig-zag canyon and that's where everybody else dies. So, if weather comes in, follow your compass due south to the lodge.

Make sure your team is confident and able to self-arrest. Every time I climb that mountain I see someone fall and tumble without making an effort to self-arrest.

Here's a great website to keep an eye on developing conditions: mountain-forecast.com/peaks...

Chris C. · · Seattle, WA · Joined Mar 2016 · Points: 81

Good info, George!

What's the solo situation during that time of the year? Are the crevasses fully covered up?

George W · · Unknown Hometown · Joined Sep 2015 · Points: 3

Most people solo that route regardless of the visibility of the bergshrund.

diepj · · PDX · Joined Apr 2014 · Points: 0

+1 for George.

After many climbs by the south side I've never placed a screw. On other routes sure but if that was what you were thinking you'd be asking more specific questions. Most folks solo if they are confident/experienced on moderate snow. I'll repeat: if you simul you MUST place solid pro (pickets are fine). It is for your safety and also that of those climbing around you.

Watch the weather. It's a great time of year to climb however it is also the time of year when long periods of wx system after system rolling through can mean few opportunities to get out. Watch the avy danger as well. Conditions up high will not be the same as in the low elevation forecasts.

Know the descent bearing and have a back up plan if the weather doesn't cooperate. (Smith?)

Ben Ambrose · · Unknown Hometown · Joined Apr 2016 · Points: 0

Sounds great. And yes I meant the Southern route. So beyond pickets and rope any other pro suggestions? Should I bring anything from my regular rack?

Kyle Tarry · · Portland, OR · Joined Mar 2015 · Points: 87
Ben Ambrose wrote:Sounds great. And yes I meant the Southern route. So beyond pickets and rope any other pro suggestions? Should I bring anything from my regular rack?
The route isn't really as hard as you seem to think it is. Many people would not even bother with a harness on the S. Side route.

Zero chance you're going to get any rock gear in, don't bother. The standard variations are all way easier than you;'d need rock gear for anyway.

I was up there last weekend (not on the route, but in the vicinity) and the std. route looked in. They are getting quite a bit of snow right now, so be careful and cognizant of conditions before you commit to a climb. Bergshrund looked like it was still open, but you don't even need to negotiate it if you go through the chutes.

chrisccc wrote:+1 on beta Would love to know what routes tend to be in during late fall and early winter.
Lots of stuff "can" be in, it's very dependent on the weather in the preceding week/weeks. It's very dependent on your capabilities and willingness to hike also. Starting in Nov/Dec, you might be able to get on the following:

-N. Face Gullies
-Leuthold Couloir
-Reid Headwall
-S. Side Std
-Wy'east
-Cathedral Ridge

There are some more obscure routes that might be in too, but I am not as familiar with them. DKH might be in. I'd probably stay off the routes with more crevasse hazard in early season (Sunshine, Coe, Sandy), but that's just me.

I got on Leuthold in mid-January last year and it was primo climbing.
Chris C. · · Seattle, WA · Joined Mar 2016 · Points: 81
Kyle Tarry wrote: The route isn't really as hard as you seem to think it is. Many people would not even bother with a harness on the S. Side route. Zero chance you're going to get any rock gear in, don't bother. The standard variations are all way easier than you;'d need rock gear for anyway. I was up there last weekend (not on the route, but in the vicinity) and the std. route looked in. They are getting quite a bit of snow right now, so be careful and cognizant of conditions before you commit to a climb. Bergshrund looked like it was still open, but you don't even need to negotiate it if you go through the chutes. Lots of stuff "can" be in, it's very dependent on the weather in the preceding week/weeks. It's very dependent on your capabilities and willingness to hike also. Starting in Nov/Dec, you might be able to get on the following: -N. Face Gullies -Leuthold Couloir -Reid Headwall -S. Side Std -Wy'east -Cathedral Ridge There are some more obscure routes that might be in too, but I am not as familiar with them. DKH might be in. I'd probably stay off the routes with more crevasse hazard in early season (Sunshine, Coe, Sandy), but that's just me. I got on Leuthold in mid-January last year and it was primo climbing.
Amazing info. I feel like I need to buy you a beer.
Kyle Tarry · · Portland, OR · Joined Mar 2015 · Points: 87
chrisccc wrote: Amazing info. I feel like I need to buy you a beer.
I feel like I wasn't even that helpful!

FYI, some guys have been getting up there already this season. A couple trip reports (second one is mine, not from the main summit, but gives some flavor to the conditions):

http://cascadeclimbers.com/forum/ubbthreads.php?ubb=showflat&Number=1152295

http://cascadeclimbers.com/forum/ubbthreads.php?ubb=showflat&Number=1152284

The biggest thing to keep in mind that that everything is dependent on weather and conditions the week or so leading up to climb day. All the big routes are "in" as far as sufficient coverage from id-winter on, but you have to be aware of avalanche danger and general risk of a miserable day of postholing. Stuff starts to firm up and weather gets more stable in late spring. Some of the north face routes are supposed to be best in early winter (Nov-Dec), I haven't been on them yet personally (but they are on my to-do list for the next month or so!).
Chris C. · · Seattle, WA · Joined Mar 2016 · Points: 81
Kyle Tarry wrote: I feel like I wasn't even that helpful! FYI, some guys have been getting up there already this season. A couple trip reports (second one is mine, not from the main summit, but gives some flavor to the conditions): cascadeclimbers.com/forum/u...;Number=1152295 cascadeclimbers.com/forum/u...;Number=1152284 The biggest thing to keep in mind that that everything is dependent on weather and conditions the week or so leading up to climb day. All the big routes are "in" as far as sufficient coverage from id-winter on, but you have to be aware of avalanche danger and general risk of a miserable day of postholing. Stuff starts to firm up and weather gets more stable in late spring. Some of the north face routes are supposed to be best in early winter (Nov-Dec), I haven't been on them yet personally (but they are on my to-do list for the next month or so!).
Oh awesome, I saw that Iron Maiden post on CC - didn't realize it was you!
wankel7 · · Indiana · Joined Oct 2010 · Points: 0

I did it solo today. Camped overnight at the lodge and was heading up at 620 am.

I didn't need crampons until Castle Rock. As I started into the hogback I wasn't able to identify the bergshrund so I went left and went up old chute to the summit arriving at 1020.

The day was bluebird and warm. I was surprised that not much ice and snow was coming off the mountains. And I didn't see much evidence in the snow of large pieces coming off in the past.

I had a blast what a beautiful mountain!

Have fun!

Also, you need an Oregon SnoPark pass for $25 to park in the lot.

Kyle Tarry · · Portland, OR · Joined Mar 2015 · Points: 87

Good work!

FYI, it's "Crater Rock," not "Castle Rock."

Pretty warm this week, but might cool down this weekend. Looks like quite a few of the crater routes are open.

Chris C. · · Seattle, WA · Joined Mar 2016 · Points: 81
wankel7 wrote:I did it solo today. Camped overnight at the lodge and was heading up at 620 am. I didn't need crampons until Castle Rock. As I started into the hogback I wasn't able to identify the bergshrund so I went left and went up old chute to the summit arriving at 1020. The day was bluebird and warm. I was surprised that not much ice and snow was coming off the mountains. And I didn't see much evidence in the snow of large pieces coming off in the past. I had a blast what a beautiful mountain! Have fun! Also, you need an Oregon SnoPark pass for $25 to park in the lot.
Jealous. I was planning to climb today but got stomped by work. Good job!
Max Tepfer · · Bend, OR · Joined Oct 2007 · Points: 1,520

A little off topic, but here's the best tool for forecasting weather on the mountain:

http://www.atmos.washington.edu/mm5rt/rt/showtimeheight_d3.cgi?initmodel=GFS&yyyymmddhh=current_gfs&loc=kttd&locname=Troutdale,OR&latlon=45.55N,122.4W

FWIW, mountain-forecast is the least accurate, NOAA is somewhat accurate but tends towards the conservative. Yr.no is my go to 'normal' product for the PNW and is typically correct more often than NOAA or MF. (but again, for specificity, you can't beat the timeheight)

Tico · · Unknown Hometown · Joined Feb 2006 · Points: 0

Whatever Max. Maybe lay off on the bullshit advice on something you know zero about.

wankel7 · · Indiana · Joined Oct 2010 · Points: 0
Tico wrote:Whatever Max. Maybe lay off on the bullshit advice on something you know zero about.
What do you recommend?
Allen Sanderson · · Oootah · Joined Jul 2007 · Points: 1,115

Bring a fucking compass and know how to use the damn thing. Many of climbers have tried to descend in a white out only to get lost. November is a great month for it to piss sideways.

Max Tepfer · · Bend, OR · Joined Oct 2007 · Points: 1,520
wankel7 wrote: What do you recommend?
Tico's a friend and coworker with too much time on his hands and his phone permanently interfaced with his cerebral cortex.
Guideline #1: Don't be a jerk.

Post a Reply

Log In to Reply