Gregory Alpinisto?


Original Post
JasonSH · · unknown · Joined Apr 2015 · Points: 0

So I'm a Gregory backpacks guy but I'm STILL looking for a crag pack that will double as an alpine and ice climbing gear pack. I've tried the Mammut Trion series and found my torso is apparently to short for them (measures about 17.5 inches)
I've tried the Lowe Alpine Attack 45:55 and love the pack but the hip belt is a total joke! No support whatsoever with it loaded up with my full trad rack, rope, harness, shoes etc. Very sad and bad design in my opinion. WIsh I could rip the belt off and sew on a better one that doesn't resemble a shoelace!

So I'm looking now, at the Gregory Apinisto 50L.

Any experience with these??
Thanks

Eric R · · Unknown Hometown · Joined Jan 2013 · Points: 0

I've liked mine quite a bit. Carrys great and climbs well. All the features make it a bit heavy for it's size, but they're all well executed. Only thing I haven't used and appreciated is the full side-zip.

I did try stripping it all the way down on a recent climb on Longs Peak. without the frame sheet the back padding slouched a bunch and was annoying. Next time I'll pull the stay and leave the frame sheet.

JasonSH · · unknown · Joined Apr 2015 · Points: 0
Eric R wrote:I've liked mine quite a bit. Carrys great and climbs well. All the features make it a bit heavy for it's size, but they're all well executed. Only thing I haven't used and appreciated is the full side-zip. I did try stripping it all the way down on a recent climb on Longs Peak. without the frame sheet the back padding slouched a bunch and was annoying. Next time I'll pull the stay and leave the frame sheet.
is IS on the heavy side huh?....crap. I was using my Baltoro 65 as a crag pack,.. heavy as heck! Horrible! trying to get away from a heavy pack.
Ryan Hamilton · · Orem · Joined Aug 2011 · Points: 0

I don't know of any bigger packs that would work well for cragging, that aren't heavy. The light one's are usually made of lighter material that is going to rip through pretty quickly with all the metal stuffed in a pack and/or dropped, dragged, thrown around at the crag.

I don't have the Alpinisto 50, but I have the 35 and think it's pretty good. I'm thinking the 50 would likely be lighter than the Baltoro because it is aimed at Alpine climbing, which strips away a lot of weight and extra pockets, etc.

Morgan Patterson · · CT · Joined Oct 2009 · Points: 8,332

Check out the Black Diamond Speed 40/50...

Nick Votto · · Unknown Hometown · Joined Jul 2008 · Points: 80

I've used the Alpinisto for a few years now, from backcountry ski tours to ice climbing to a crag pack.
Absolutely great pack for comfort and function. I may be willing to part with mine actually, so many packs

Nolan Huther · · Clarkson University · Joined Dec 2014 · Points: 567

I have the Gregory Alpinisto 50-ish pack (varies by size slightly). I've been using it for two years for ice, rock, backcountry and winter hiking. My opinion is that its a solid pack, and not bad as far as weight goes. I wouldn't call it heavy like the a backpacking pack like the Baltoro.

It climbs well due to its design and has a high hipbelt that sits above the harness. It is has a strange attachment system for ice tools but I think the newer model might have the traditional loops at the base. Crampon pouch and the hook-closure are nice. Ice clipper slots are tight with the Petzl clippers. I can easily strap on a pair of snowshoes to it as well, which might be handy depending on where you're from. It also has a slight pocket on the side that works for snow pickets/wands. The pack has a lack of padding- I believe the idea is that you are wearing more layers for winter stuff so those act a spading, and in the alpine you shouldn't want frivolities like extra comfort anyways, so long as it still works.

For summer stuff, it is a bit lacking on padding, and the high hip belt combine to make it not the best for hauling in the summer, but it's not bad. If its just cragging then you won't notice it much, and for longer hikes then just find the sweet spot with adjusting straps. The pack is hydration compatible, which is a plus for me as I use a camelbak for the longer summer hikes. Side-note: the crampon pouch fits a Nalgene perfectly! It does get a tad sweaty as it has no ventilation but it doesn't bother me personally.

I also find it useful that you can break down the pack into a multipitch/alpine pack fairly well by removing the waist belt padding, top notch, and frame if you so desire. You can strap the side straps across the entire pack to compress it down even further.

The only damage I've had on it was that a heavy hit while navigating spruce-thicketed boulder fields damaged the zipper, so if I use it I do so carefully, and a pin-head size hole was caused by a nut tool sticking out the side (nothing a bit of duct tape can't fix). For some of the abuse its been through, I think that that's pretty good. I've been quite happy with it.

PS- if you don't like the hipbelt on the Lowe Alpine pack you mentioned, then don't cozy up to the Alpinisto- or just about any alpine pack!

Max Forbes · · Vermont & Colorado · Joined Jan 2014 · Points: 24

Have you considered the women's version of the mammut bags? My I have a trion guide 35 and love it. My partner, who is 5'3" also has one and loves it for craging and ice climbing. Color is total neutral and the fit is good.

JasonSH · · unknown · Joined Apr 2015 · Points: 0

PS- if you don't like the hipbelt on the Lowe Alpine pack you mentioned, then don't cozy up to the Alpinisto- or just about any alpine pack!

I've had small belted packs before but that alpine attack was unbearable with the load of trad gear in it...

JasonSH · · unknown · Joined Apr 2015 · Points: 0
Max Forbes wrote:Have you considered the women's version of the mammut bags? My I have a trion guide 35 and love it. My partner, who is 5'3" also has one and loves it for craging and ice climbing. Color is total neutral and the fit is good.
Ironic you mention that I was thinking about trying that actually! Haha
AlpineIce · · Upstate, NY · Joined Mar 2011 · Points: 0

Like I mentioned in the other thread, I've had zero issues with the Alpine Attack's hipbelt. It's been a damn good pack for me. Since it didn't fit your needs, have you tried the Osprey Varient 52 or The North Face Cobra 52? I'm not a huge fan of anything North Face, but their Cobra line of packs is dialed-in for cragging/ice. If I were in the market for a new crag pack, I'd give the Cobra 52 serious thought. They also make a Cobra 60 liter pack.

They just released their Summit Series Alpine 50 Pack a couple weeks ago as well.

I have an Alpinisto 35 & I like it a lot, but the lid is not strippable and that bugged me. Not sure if the 50's lid is removable or not.

Most people are going to chime in with either CiloGear, Cold Cold World or Hyperlite Mountain Gear as they are all extremely light, strippable and simplistic. I've owned a CiloGear pack and I hated the way it carried when fully weighted. Wasn't for me, so I sold it.

I've read good reviews on Mammut's Trion series. If you can't find what you're looking for, there's always the option of having a pack custom built. Cold Cold World will add/subtract preferences on his packs. There's also a new pack company out of Ouray, CO called Alpine Luddites who construct some serious, alpine-style packs custom tailored and made to order.

Hope this helps!

Chris C. · · Seattle, WA · Joined Mar 2016 · Points: 91

I owned the HMG pack and unfortunately would not recommend it for your situation. The roll-up bag is complicated to open and close in tight situations, and without a lid, you have quick access to nothing. I like to keep a small nalgine and a bit of food in my lid for quick refusing between pitches. Basic things like that become quite the ordeal with the roll-up.

Great pack for going ultralight in the alpine. But not really an all around pack.

Guideline #1: Don't be a jerk.

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