Shoes for Red Rocks


Original Post
double delay · · Asheville, NC · Joined Jul 2014 · Points: 0

Heading to Red Rocks early December and I've got a perfectly good pair of pink Anasazis that are sized great for 1-3 pitches but would be intolerable for some of the 6-8-10 pitch climbs I anticipate there. Any thoughts on whether I should go in the direction of mocs for comfort in combination with the anasazis or is it really going to be best to get an all arounder like the TC pros? also weighing the price point between the two. Thanks!

BoulderCharles · · Unknown Hometown · Joined Sep 2011 · Points: 25

TC Pros are definitely worth the money for long days. They are stiff enough that you can even wear them with a thin sock and still climb pretty hard.

Ted Pinson · · Chicago, IL · Joined Jul 2014 · Points: 45

Moccs are incredibly comfortable (depending on sizing), but not terribly supportive. I could see you getting some pretty tired legs after 10 pitches in Moccs. Do you take your Pinks off between pitches? I know that this is easier said than done, but this might be a good idea after 2-3 pitches. TC Pros are comfy and supportive and still perform really well even if you size for comfort, but they are not cheap.

Zachary Winters · · Mazama, Washington · Joined Aug 2014 · Points: 25

Do you like your Pinks? Maybe get another pair a half size up? My pinks are my long route shoes, and I love them. Good for edging and crack climbing - perfect for RR. I love TC Pros, but not for climbing thin cracks so I prefer the Pinks for routes you get a little of everything. I think Mocs would suck for the edgy pitches at RR.

clint helander · · anchorage, alaska · Joined Dec 2007 · Points: 438

You guys are crazy. You don't need TC Pros to climb moderates in RR.

Use whatever shoe is comfortable and go climb!

Ted Pinson · · Chicago, IL · Joined Jul 2014 · Points: 45

You might notice that he didn't specify a grade range....

evan h · · Denver, CO · Joined Oct 2012 · Points: 205

Taking them off at belays sounds cheaper than a new pair of shoes. My $0.02.

Jim Titt · · Germany · Joined Nov 2009 · Points: 0
Ted Pinson wrote:You might notice that he didn't specify a grade range....
Yeah and his profile says leads 5.10a.....
At Red Rocks a pair of decent approach shoes got me up that stuff and I´m fat, weak, old and talentless:-)
Locker · · Yucca Valley, CA · Joined Oct 2002 · Points: 1,640
"Taking them off at belays sounds cheaper than a new pair of shoes"

Not a great habit to get into if you're nickname is "Butterfingers".

Personally I think climbing in a pair of comfortable shoes is a better idea.
Colonel Mustard · · Sacramento, CA · Joined Sep 2005 · Points: 1,055
Locker wrote:Personally I think climbing in a pair of comfortable shoes is a better idea.
Yeah, but then how are you going to add an extra half hour to your climb time?
Locker · · Yucca Valley, CA · Joined Oct 2002 · Points: 1,640
"Yeah, but then how are you going to add an extra half hour to your climb time?"

Weed, pipe, lighter.

:-)
Colonel Mustard · · Sacramento, CA · Joined Sep 2005 · Points: 1,055

Locker wins.

After we settle the shoe conundrum, could we discuss how to wipe your butt on a trad climb? I go to the old standby of a ham sandwich, but keep losing my appetite. PLEASE HELP ME MAKE SIMPLE DECISIONS!!!

evan h · · Denver, CO · Joined Oct 2012 · Points: 205
Locker wrote: Personally I think climbing in a pair of comfortable shoes is a better idea.
Of course, this is ideal. I'm just trying to be realistic. Sure, go ahead and grab a pair of TC Pros -- they're great shoes (as they should be for $180). I own a pair and use them often for multi-pitch climbing, but I still never wear them for more than 2-3 pitches anyway. Obviously, you have to be careful, and perhaps you just partially remove them to ease the tension (which can all be done while you belay your second, in addition to eating/drinking/adding layers/picking your nose, etc -- it's boring on belay). If your climbing shoes are so spacious to allow comfortable climbing for 10 pitches, they're really no more than approach shoes without traction. That's the case for my feet, anyway.

As far as wasted time, again, the trick is to handle this business while belaying (a follower). Worst case scenario, it's hardly Patagonian alpine conditions over there. You're safer on the walls than in Vegas!
Locker · · Yucca Valley, CA · Joined Oct 2002 · Points: 1,640

All fine and dandy until you drop a shoe or two.

:-)

evan h · · Denver, CO · Joined Oct 2012 · Points: 205

I know -- I'll immediately think of this post when I finally manage to drop one!

Locker · · Yucca Valley, CA · Joined Oct 2002 · Points: 1,640

So will your X climbing partner.

LOL!

Ted Pinson · · Chicago, IL · Joined Jul 2014 · Points: 45

Hmm...climbing in approach shoes is an interesting idea. Anyone ever climb cracks in them?

Guideline #1: Don't be a jerk.

Post a Reply

Log In to Reply