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Anyone used Dry Ice tools? Also just for fun/training?


Original Post
Climb Germany · · Unknown Hometown · Joined Mar 2015 · Points: 2,525

I'm considering picking up a pair of Dry Ice tools. I have zero ice climbing experience and where I live there's no ice.

My interest/purchasing motivation would be:

  • Looks interesting/fun to try
  • Could also be good "alternative" training, i.e. another angle
  • Could help with gaining some similarish experience for future real ice attempts

Any thoughts? Anyone who's picked up a pair for the gym?
Ruth23 · · Unknown Hometown · Joined Mar 2016 · Points: 0

You really need to have the route set specifically for the tools. They don't work well on every hold and that can be frustrating. They can be fun if the route setter knows what they are doing. Furnace Industries is a good company, and will train route setters if your local gym is interested.

Climb Germany · · Unknown Hometown · Joined Mar 2015 · Points: 2,525

There are no routes at all for this or dry tooling in my gym.

Ryan Hamilton · · Orem · Joined Aug 2011 · Points: 20

Yep, I have a set and they work, but you really have to have a route set for them otherwise there isn't likely to be enough holds set that will work with them. They've sat in my gear closet for 2 years not being used.

Max Forbes · · Vermont & Colorado · Joined Jan 2014 · Points: 114

They work great on 5.6 jug hauls. I've used them and would never use them as a training tool. I think they build bad mixed climbing technique for a number of reasons. Ultimately I think there a bit of a toy and lose there appeal quickly.

sandrock · · Colorado Springs, CO · Joined Jul 2013 · Points: 115

These are better:

escapeclimbing.com/extra/dr…

DCarey · · Missoula · Joined Aug 2014 · Points: 15
Max Forbes wrote:They work great on 5.6 jug hauls. I've used them and would never use them as a training tool. I think they build bad mixed climbing technique for a number of reasons. Ultimately I think there a bit of a toy and lose there appeal quickly.
Dry Ice Tools specifically, or any indoor ice/mixed climbing tool variation?
Ben Stabley · · Portland, OR · Joined Sep 2014 · Points: 171

Kinda fun, but you need big jugs to hook, and wrapping a rubber belt around a giant jug is not close to putting a tool edge on a rock. Like Max said, more of a novel toy than anything.

The Escape Climbing picks look better, but I've read a review on MP here that says the rubber on the tip of the pick wears out quickly.

Climb Germany · · Unknown Hometown · Joined Mar 2015 · Points: 2,525

Thanks for all the feedback. The escape tools appear to be an even better idea than dry ice.

CornCob · · Sandy, UT · Joined Nov 2012 · Points: 20
Ben Stabley wrote:The Escape Climbing picks look better, but I've read a review on MP here that says the rubber on the tip of the pick wears out quickly.
I assume this is the review you are referring too? It looks like Escape is trying some new types of rubber to avoid wearing out as fast.
Ben Stabley · · Portland, OR · Joined Sep 2014 · Points: 171

Yes, that's the review.

FY · · Boston, MA · Joined Jun 2011 · Points: 5

first of all, if you climb ice like you would climb with one of those gadgets indoors, you are in trouble.
secondly, ice/mixed is all about pick placement, efficiency, technique (back to point 1), and staying relaxed, none of which can be trained with that stupid thing.

so what can you do at home? get a broomstick, cut two lengths, drill a hole in one end and hang them up with a cord.

a few hundred pull-ups a day will help keep the pump away
if you manage to find ice,
one day.

edit: oh and if you find a fat dead tree standing sturdy, that's a better way to simulate and you could do some laps on that.

AThomas · · Unknown Hometown · Joined Aug 2011 · Points: 25

I think they're a lot of fun and not useless as a training tool.

I do traverses with them and find they train my grip, endurance, body positioning, feet and, most importantly, maintaining that handle angle and directing force on the more marginal holds. They have a tendency to blow off the more marginal holds, though, in a different way than a pick placement.

My local gym has easy routes set on all the exterior walls, though, so there's a pretty good supply of jugs.

Obviously, they don't train you for pick placements, angles or other tooling techniques and if you're going to Tarzan swing or dyno on just giant jugs, you're missing the point and building bad habits.

AThomas · · Unknown Hometown · Joined Aug 2011 · Points: 25

Oh, make sure your gym will let you use whatever you plan on buying before you place the order.

Clay Hansen · · Colorado · Joined Jan 2010 · Points: 35
buckie06 wrote:These are better: escapeclimbing.com/extra/dr…
I own a pair of these. I do love them but the rubber is too soft, so they like to roll off smaller holds. Once the rubber wears out I'll probably "resole" them with less rubber and something more dense. Overall definitely worth the money.

Edit**

I should mention make sure the gym is cool with you using them first.
AThomas · · Unknown Hometown · Joined Aug 2011 · Points: 25
Clay Hansen wrote: I own a pair of these. I do love them but the rubber is too soft, so they like to roll off smaller holds. Once the rubber wears out I'll probably "resole" them with less rubber and something more dense. Overall definitely worth the money. Edit** I should mention make sure the gym is cool with you using them first.
Do you keep them on a dedicated set of tools?

Another thing that I meant to mention is that it's kind of a pain in the ass to constantly switch out picks. So, unless you have a dedicated set of tools, and you're anything like me, you'll probably just use the Escape picks in the fall.

If I had an extra set of tools laying around, I'd definitely buy some, though. Maybe I should look for some used Fusions. . . .

Edit: PS, geartrade.com/item/475388/d…
AThomas · · Unknown Hometown · Joined Aug 2011 · Points: 25

How do we get this moved to the ice climbing forum?

Clay Hansen · · Colorado · Joined Jan 2010 · Points: 35
AThomas wrote: Do you keep them on a dedicated set of tools? Another thing that I meant to mention is that it's kind of a pain in the ass to constantly switch out picks. So, unless you have a dedicated set of tools, and you're anything like me, you'll probably just use the Escape picks in the fall. If I had an extra set of tools laying around, I'd definitely buy some, though. Maybe I should look for some used Fusions. . . . Edit: PS, geartrade.com/item/475388/d…
No dedicated tools sadly, although that would be ideal. I switch them in and out on my nomics. It is mainly a fall training tool, but if I go a while without climbing I'll toss them back on to maintain my overall fitness for ice/mixed. It only takes 10 minutes or so (maybe not even that) to swap the picks but overall I do think they're worth the money.
alpinejason · · Minneapolis · Joined Apr 2010 · Points: 175
AThomas wrote: Do you keep them on a dedicated set of tools? Another thing that I meant to mention is that it's kind of a pain in the ass to constantly switch out picks. So, unless you have a dedicated set of tools, and you're anything like me, you'll probably just use the Escape picks in the fall. If I had an extra set of tools laying around, I'd definitely buy some, though. Maybe I should look for some used Fusions. . . . Edit: PS, geartrade.com/item/475388/d…
I had my Escape picks on a dedicated set last season but I sold that pair this year. Changing picks shouldn't be a deterrent, takes me longer to unload my dishwasher.

That said I'm a buying another dedicated set.
Guideline #1: Don't be a jerk.

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