Black Diamond climbing ropes


Original Post
Ellis L · · Toyota Matrix, CA · Joined Apr 2016 · Points: 35

Has anyone tried one yet? The stats and prices look good. Opinions?

http://blackdiamondequipment.com/en_US/climbing-ropes/9-6-70m-fulldry-climbing-rope-BD323035DUGNF701.html#start=7

Micah Klesick · · Vancouver, WA · Joined Aug 2013 · Points: 3,834

When did they start making ropes!?

Gary N · · Durango, CO · Joined Jul 2010 · Points: 510

Recall in 3...2...1...

Ellis L · · Toyota Matrix, CA · Joined Apr 2016 · Points: 35
Micah Klesick wrote:When did they start making ropes!?
I think they unveiled them at the trade show this summer. It looks like ropes were just added to the website, but one of them is sold out already so people are buying them. Also anyone know if this is just another rebranding of a smaller company?
Micah Klesick · · Vancouver, WA · Joined Aug 2013 · Points: 3,834

Well, I needed a new rope, so I got one. I'll write up a review once I get a chance to use it! I'll try it with the new Trango Vergo!

Kevin MP · · Redmond, OR · Joined Nov 2013 · Points: 178

No bi-pattern? That's like, a bummer, man.

DavisMeschke Guillotine · · Pinedale, WY · Joined Oct 2013 · Points: 45

They said they would be doing bi pattern in the future.

eli poss · · Durango, Co · Joined May 2014 · Points: 136
Micah Klesick wrote:When did they start making ropes!?
They don't make ropes, they sell ropes. They have another company, beal i think, make ropes for them and then slap their brand and marketing on 'em. Perhaps chouinard made ropes in-house, but I'm not sure.
patto · · Unknown Hometown · Joined Jul 2012 · Points: 0

Beal make good ropes. So you probably can't go too far wrong...

That said these are all the steps of milking a brand label for all the short term profit you can. Long term they are diluting the brand's reputation, it usually doesn't end well for the serious users of their products.

Though it may turn out to be a good profit making move.

TCC · · Unknown Hometown · Joined May 2016 · Points: 0
Ben Glanton wrote:^^+1 yup, they're being produced by Beal for Black Diamond. Same thing with Petzl.
I believe Roca is making the BD ropes. Edelrid has been making ropes for Petzl since late 2013 or 2014.
Ian Machen · · Reno, NV · Joined Sep 2016 · Points: 20

From what I've heard from reps is that they have identified that there are gaps in their product line. They want to be able to sell everything a person would need to climb, ski, hike, or camp in-house. Whether that's diluting the brand... maybe. I'm a bit of a brand whore though, so I'll probably get one.

John Wilder · · Las Vegas, NV · Joined Feb 2004 · Points: 1,500
TCC wrote: I believe Roca is making the BD ropes. Edelrid has been making ropes for Petzl since late 2013 or 2014.
This. Roca is making BDs new rope line.

Black Diamond used to distribute Beal ropes back in the 90s and early 2000s, but stopped for reasons I can't remember at the moment.
DavisMeschke Guillotine · · Pinedale, WY · Joined Oct 2013 · Points: 45

The ropes aren't bad at all. The skinnier ropes are treated as well. What I remember from the line showing was the the price was the ropes are very price conscious. Like someone said above, they're rounding out their product line so that someone who wants to get into climbing can have a one-stop-shop with their brand. It's a smart move and I don't think it dilutes their brand image at all. They're well-made ropes; BD wouldn't just throw a product out there.

mattm · · TX · Joined Jun 2006 · Points: 550
DavisMeschke wrote:The ropes aren't bad at all. The skinnier ropes are treated as well. What I remember from the line showing was the the price was the ropes are very price conscious. Like someone said above, they're rounding out their product line so that someone who wants to get into climbing can have a one-stop-shop with their brand. It's a smart move and I don't think it dilutes their brand image at all. They're well-made ropes; BD wouldn't just throw a product out there.
^+1

Roca is a well established brand elsewhere - I've been quite curious about their Siurana and the Endurance sheath.

Why can't more companies sell 9.6/9.8mm ropes in 80M? Sterling is comically expensive for 80m and the other brands are hard to find in 80m above 9.2. That's just too damn skinny for me. I don't mind the weight since 90% of the time, it's at most, 40m of rope on me.

BD Ropes don't dilute the brand. BD's "Brand" historically is climbing hard goods and related gear. They once sold ropes, which is a core "hard good" for climbing so I don't see the dilution. Arguably their biggest dilution risk recently was their clothing line but I've been very impressed with their offerings so far so not sure that sky has fallen.

If BD started slapping their logo on camp chairs, two buner stoves etc then I might worry a bit...
a.l. · · Unknown Hometown · Joined Jan 2008 · Points: 0

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=sckUv1g9Ms4

Norse Force · · Nederland, CO · Joined Nov 2012 · Points: 0

Confused as to how their 9.2 holds more UIAA falls (7) than their 9.9 (6) which is "our burliest rope made for heavy use".

CornCob · · Sandy, UT · Joined Nov 2012 · Points: 0
Norse Force wrote:Confused as to how their 9.2 holds more UIAA falls (7) than their 9.9 (6) which is "our burliest rope made for heavy use".
Fall rating isn't a good measure of overall "burliness". It just means the in rapid succession the 9.2 will last one fall longer than the 9.9

You can still fall on both ropes many more times than the rating, assuming a reasonable rest period. The 9.9 is likely more resilient in terms of abrasion and general wear-and-tear in comparison to the 9.2, making it their "burliest".
Ed Schaefer · · Centennial, CO · Joined May 2014 · Points: 0
Norse Force wrote:Confused as to how their 9.2 holds more UIAA falls (7) than their 9.9 (6) which is "our burliest rope made for heavy use".
Total speculation, but I think it might have to do with the dynamic elongation % and impact forces, I'd guess that the 9.2 stretches and bounces back more effectively as a result giving it the extra fall.

Maybe someone with more knowledge on this topic can chime in.
David Gibbs · · Ottawa, ON · Joined Aug 2010 · Points: 6
Norse Force wrote:Confused as to how their 9.2 holds more UIAA falls (7) than their 9.9 (6) which is "our burliest rope made for heavy use".
Core vs sheath.

Generally, the more sheath a rope has, the better it will hold up to top-roping, sharp edges, abrasion on slabs, etc. This is probably what they mean by "burliness".

Generally, the more core a rope has, the more it can handle a rapid succession of hard to very hard falls.

A thinner rope that holds more UIAA falls likely has a very high core percent, thin sheath, and will not take the long-term abuse of the "burlier" rope.

So, if you're trying to red-point a hard project, you may want the lighter rope with more falls. If you're looking for a work-horse rope for cragging, especially at less-than-vertical walls, then "burliest rope for heavy use" would be the choice to make.
John Wilder · · Las Vegas, NV · Joined Feb 2004 · Points: 1,500
Norse Force wrote:Confused as to how their 9.2 holds more UIAA falls (7) than their 9.9 (6) which is "our burliest rope made for heavy use".
The UIAA fall rating is essentially a waste of text on the rope- its not at all useful in any way at all for the consumer. Ignore it in favor of Sheath percentage, impact force, and weight.
Jason Halladay · · Los Alamos, NM · Joined Oct 2005 · Points: 9,836

I bought the BD 9.2mm 70m (non-dry) rope last week and climbed on it this past weekend. My initial impressions are favorable...I liked the handling feel and the initial "pig tail" curling that happens with a new rope cleared itself after a couple of routes. Thus far, I'm impressed and don't regret the purchase. I'll be curious to see how the longevity is as one friend that had a Roca rope years ago wasn't impressed with how quickly it "fuzzed out." Perhaps that Roca was a cheap one and this is better. We'll see...

Just so you know my rope preferences and what I compare this BD rope to, I've been a long-time user of the Beal Stinger 9.4mm ropes. I really like the handling, the impact force stat and the durability.

My last rope was a Sterling Ion R 9.4mm what I was never completely pleased with it on account of its stiffer handling and tendency to pig-tail just a bit even after a good bit of use (I do "properly uncoil" new ropes.)

On the size note, 9.2mm is so skinny! After using 9.4mm for many years, I didn't think going down to 9.2mm would be that noticeable. I'm glad it's not a dry-treated 9.2mm as it already feels super fast through the GriGri2.

Guideline #1: Don't be a jerk.

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