Mammut rope sheath cut. Still usable?


Original Post
Stephanie Sch · Oct 4, 2016 · Unknown Hometown · Joined Oct 2016 · Points: 0
I bought my 70m Mammut rope a few month ago and have only been climbing on some weekends since then. Last weekend I discovered a small cut in the sheath. It looks like two or three of the strands in the weave have been cut (not sure when and how). Do you think it's still ok to climb with this? The core seems to be unharmed and the core is also not showing.

nomadian · Oct 4, 2016 · MA · Joined Oct 2010 · Points: 0
Can you post a picture? You'll get a more informed response that way.

grog m aka Greg McKee · Oct 4, 2016 · Unknown Hometown · Joined Aug 2012 · Points: 0
Pics for the MP scientists please

Michael Schneider · Oct 4, 2016 · Unknown Hometown · Joined Apr 2014 · Points: 85
Stephanie Sch wrote:I bought my 70m Mammut rope a few month ago and have only been climbing on some weekends since then. Last weekend I discovered a small cut in the sheath. It looks like two or three of the strands in the weave have been cut (not sure when and how). Do you think it's still ok to climb with this? The core seems to be unharmed and the core is also not showing.
Yes the rope is your life line. You should know what happens to your cord
Your life and anyone who climbs with it depends on it...
BUT you have said it is new.

This is what you must try to grasp, your rope is fine.

Many people climb on ropes that have blemishes. scuffing, shinny stretches indicating wear, or melting?

Those are some of the signs that seem to be a point that most climbers retire a rope.

They are beyond cosmetic.
They do decrease the overall strength of the rope, by compromising the sheath.
That said I'm not a believer in the common idea that you need to retire a rope at any given age.

I know that today's ropes show signs of serious wear, flat sections, bumps & slippage, in the 1st 6 months of regular (3-4 hundred feet every 6 or 7 days)use.
amazing! To me that is a defective product.
The rope manufacturers sometimes agree but only offer a deal on the same rope not a free replacement.

Some people climb on ropes that have holes, what are called 'Core shot(s)'
You can see & touch the core.
That is way to far gone for most of us to consider climbing with - for most, - not all.

I'm sure you will be told not to lead on it. I can understand that, why chance it.
It IS your life line.
That sort of thinking is fine as well.
If you lean that way ? Keep your cord, be glad you have an almost perfect rope as a back up.
Use it to set top ropes or as a follow /rappel cord.

Ugh yup for sure!

The Burchinator calls troll !
Proud Dad ! Hay there pops how's the hours of bliss 3am to 6?
Thee-twisted sister the trollanator?
Yeah I smell that smell

Burcheydawwwwwwg · Oct 4, 2016 · Unknown Hometown · Joined Jan 2012 · Points: 375
ffffffffffffffffffffffffffffffffffffffuuuuuuuuhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhh

Steven Groetken · Oct 4, 2016 · Durango, CO · Joined Sep 2012 · Points: 10
Eleanor, my love. I have missed you!

Stephanie Sch · Oct 4, 2016 · Unknown Hometown · Joined Oct 2016 · Points: 0

Stephanie Sch · Oct 4, 2016 · Unknown Hometown · Joined Oct 2016 · Points: 0

Andy Rasmussen · Oct 4, 2016 · MA · Joined Jan 2016 · Points: 25
singe it with a lighter and keep climbing

apoet · Oct 4, 2016 · AZ · Joined Oct 2015 · Points: 183
Damn that's a pretty nasty gash. Don't let anyone tell you that thing is safe anymore. Retire it asap.

Old lady H · Oct 4, 2016 · Boise, Idaho · Joined Aug 2015 · Points: 40
Eeeyup. Troll patrol embarrassed themselves in public again. :-)

Hang in there, Stephanie. They're nicer than they let on, and you'll get reasonable answers. I can't answer your question, but there's gotta be a few thousand years of combined experience on here.

Best, H.

CornCob · Oct 4, 2016 · Sandy, UT · Joined Nov 2012 · Points: 0
If the damage is near the end of the rope you could just cut it off. Maybe turn your questionable 70m into a perfectly fine 60m.

eli poss · Oct 5, 2016 · Durango, Co · Joined May 2014 · Points: 136
CornCob wrote:If the damage is near the end of the rope you could just cut it off. Maybe turn your questionable 70m into a perfectly fine 60m.
this. if it's not near the ends then i'd just singe with a lighter and tape over it. If you tape over it, use tape that has a slick surface to reduce friction.

20 kN · Oct 5, 2016 · Hawaii · Joined Feb 2009 · Points: 1,128
That's fine. I've climbed on worse. No need to cut the end off, just carefully cut the strands sticking out, burn them lightly and keep climbing.

Michael Schneider · Oct 5, 2016 · Unknown Hometown · Joined Apr 2014 · Points: 85

Jim Titt · Oct 5, 2016 · Germany · Joined Nov 2009 · Points: 0

Luc-514 · Oct 5, 2016 · Montreal, Quebec · Joined Nov 2006 · Points: 8,393
Maybe return it to the store, I've seen small nicks like that from an idiot getting to liberal with a box cutter to open a shipping package or remove a plastic bag.

Norville Rogers · Oct 5, 2016 · Unknown Hometown · Joined Sep 2012 · Points: 0
That's bad rope, Stephanie. Send it to me and I'll retire it for you.

patto · Oct 5, 2016 · Unknown Hometown · Joined Jul 2012 · Points: 0
Luc wrote:Maybe return it to the store, I've seen small nicks like that from an idiot getting to liberal with a box cutter to open a shipping package or remove a plastic bag.
I'd consider this if you genuinely have not abused the rope in anyway. I've never seen a rope look so new with that sort of damage.

Either it was bad from the factory or something sharp has given it a serious nick.

Manufacturer response: Retire rope.
Tight ass climber response: Lightly melt ends to stop further fraying.

cyclestupor · Oct 5, 2016 · Woodland Park, Colorado · Joined Mar 2015 · Points: 63
As far as I can tell from your pictures, there is no core visible, and you severed maybe 2 or 3 strands of the sheath. There will be more strands undernieth the ones you severed. That rope is fine. I have a nick in one of my ropes that looks just like it, so does my buddy, and we've been climbing on them all season.

I would just pay special attention to that area whenever you inspect your rope (after each day of climbing). As long as it doesn't get any worse you are fine.

As for singing the frayed strands, I've never heard of that one... I always thought it was ok to just leave it fuzzy. Is it really a common practice to take a lighter to a rope? Seems a little risky... What if you get it a little too close and damage more of the sheath.

Also... If you cover the damage up with tape, remove it frequently to inspect it. If the damage is deeper than you think, and the sheath begins to separate you won't be able to see it if it is under tape.

nomadian · Oct 5, 2016 · MA · Joined Oct 2010 · Points: 0
Like others have said Steph, you're good. Singe or don't singe. Just keep an eye on it but I've also climbed on worse as well.

Guideline #1: Don't be a jerk.

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