Following via toprope solo


Original Post
Brian Abram · · Celo, NC · Joined Oct 2007 · Points: 483

http://www.climbing.com/skills/advanced-techniques-follow-on-toprope-solo/

http://blakeclimbs.blogspot.com/2016/09/friends-dont-let-friends-belay.html

apoet · · AZ · Joined Oct 2015 · Points: 193

Interesting reads. Doesn't seem like the best option for most groups, but definitely has benefits.

climbnplay · · Boston, MA · Joined Jun 2011 · Points: 5

a few thoughts:
1) this is best suited for a party of 2 on the wall. don't have enough energy to belay and haul every pitch? consider a 3rd member.
2) i'd only consider this if I absolutely think that saving the energy spent belaying and stacking the rope is going to be essential for success. i'd be more comfortable getting stronger/fitter or do an easier objective. maybe i'm old fashioned but if i can't spare the energy to belay my partner on a route, then probably i'm not ready for this route.
3) toprope solo-ing without any knot back-up is an unnecessary risk to me, not worthwhile. this kind of strip-down management modification is a bit like people who would never take a locking biner with them because of the extra 20g. unless you are seeking to break records and have done everything possible to maximize your fitness level, why?

David Coley · · UK · Joined Oct 2013 · Points: 70

For most of us, the following is the more likely use of the approach. The is the 2+1 approach.

Climbing in a three is most often done as with a 1+2 set up. The leader leads, then brings up both seconds at the same time via a reverso like device in guide mode. A 2+1 approach means a pair climbing the route as a pair, with the third just tagging along on a rope dragged up my the second. The third ascended the rope on TR with a microtrax or two.

Advantages. The third can go at their own place, as can the second. The normal 1+2 works well if the route is reasonably chilled, but if it is hard, 2 and 3 can get on top of each other. 3 can strip difficult to remove pieces or pegs without slowing the team. 3 can strip the belay without rushing. 3 can jug when it gets too hard for them, 3 can jug up with a heavy sack. If double ropes are needed for the pitch, and take very different lines the complexity of keeping 2 and 3 safe at the same time is removed. Buy jugging the hard bits, a weak third gets to go on a big adventure with his/her mates without getting in the way.

Disclaimer: everyone needs to know what they are doing

Michael Schneider · · Unknown Hometown · Joined Apr 2014 · Points: 735

I think this would fit more/better in the Big Walls / Aid zones, the practices used in the world of getting up & down as quickly and efficiently as possible.

climbnplay wrote:a few thoughts: 1) this is best suited for a party of 2 on the wall. don't have enough energy to belay and haul every pitch? consider a 3rd member. 2) i'd only consider this if I absolutely think that saving the energy spent belaying and stacking the rope is going to be essential for success. i'd be more comfortable getting stronger/fitter or do an easier objective. maybe i'm old fashioned but if i can't spare the energy to belay my partner on a route, then probably i'm not ready for this route. 3) toprope solo-ing without any knot back-up is an unnecessary risk to me, not worthwhile. this kind of strip-down management modification is a bit like people who would never take a locking biner with them because of the extra 20g. unless you are seeking to break records and have done everything possible to maximize your fitness level, why?
The reasons vary, but in each case it is to stream line the systems, reduce work that can't be easily shared and put more individual responsibility on each member of a climbing team

https://www.mountainproject.com/v/the-nose-with-three/112133260

These and other tactics fall under the trem ADVANCED but have become standard on walls.
There are all sorts of variations included assisted hauling
or what some used to jokingly call Russian free,
basically hauling the third, who keeps the flagged ledge and pigs flying. . .
Highly Skilled, Climbing BIG Walls : the combination of techniques; using a mastery of climbing and rigging to accomplish extreme freight hauling - using the newest technology to try to reduce the work required, to make the culmination, thousands of feet , up & down, almost survivable...
you still need to be in monster strong shape and be willing to suffer. . . YMMV.
Guideline #1: Don't be a jerk.

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