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Mental Health, especially Bipolar - - anyone else?


Old lady H · · Boise, ID · Joined Aug 2015 · Points: 385

Yeah, have that team in place, no matter how this is attacked. That was my mistake, and it was stupid.

On meds/off meds/somewhere in between, remember that the brain is a remarkable chemical pharma all by itself. "Discover" magazine had an excellent article about a year ago, on new research into placebo effect. Guess what? Real chemicals being produced, and the results were reproduced. Next step was to try and figure out how to further study and apply this within medical ethics boundaries.

I don't know about now, but way back when I was reading about it, bipolar was not one set thing, but a spectrum. A few went from reasonable (on their "depressed") end, to over the top and flying off roofs. Others, the other way, with life threatening depression, but a manageable manic end. And the meds absolutely sucked, if it was the manic end you were trying to control. It was pretty common for folks to have no success, or quit trying at all. At least that's gotten better, as have people's attitudes. Sorta.

Stick with it, all of you! Helen

Kevo · · South Lake Tahoe · Joined Aug 2012 · Points: 0

This community is frickin awesome... This isn't anything crazy informative but I'd like to share a website I reference when I need some alternative info. Earthclinic.com useful and insightful. I enjoyed reading this thread and glade I found it. Stay up homes:)

Medic741 · · Red Hook, New York · Joined Apr 2012 · Points: 265

DO NOT STOP YOUR MEDS. IF YOU FEEL GOOD KEEP UP THE REGIMENT. TALK TO YOUR DOCTOR.

I HAVE SEEN TOO MANY BEAUTIFUL PEOPLE DESTROY THEIR LIVES AND CAREERS BECAUSE THEY FELT BETTER, AND STOPPED TAKING MEDICATION. PLEASE, PLEASE, PLEASE IF YOUR MEDICATION IS WORKING STAY WITH IT.

This includes my life mentor, one of the most inspired souls I have ever known, who took his life after stopping his medication.

MENTAL ILLNESS, ESPECIALLY BIPOLAR HAS A PHYSIOLOGY THAT REQUIRES MODERN MEDICINE TO TREAT YOUR PATHOLOGY.

Please, please for the people who love you, keep taking your meds. Meds don't make you weak, and stopping them is often a self-destructive decision.

I don't post much anymore, but this really needs to be said.

-Matt

Old lady H · · Boise, ID · Joined Aug 2015 · Points: 385

Thanks, Medic!

Fritz, and all of you, this is exactly what I meant when I wanted you to know people you may never meet will care what happens to you.

Like Medic said, stick to your regimen, and I would add, kick the medical profession's butt until they get it right, and have some patience with the process. Meds have come a long, long ways.

You also may have to accept that your judgement may be impaired, and work out plans in advance for dealing with that, with those who are your innermost circle of life support. Kinda similar for alcoholics, cancer patients, and lots of others. Figure some stuff out in the good stretches, with your team, to be prepared for the bad stretches.

And, please, please, don't ever break anyone's heart. Somebody, somewhere, will always love you. Suicide, intentional or not, raises the likelihood of people you love following suit. It even lowers the bar for people not close to you. Hammer that in, however you need to: suicide, not an option. Not on the table, not ever. Because I know it would kill ___________.

I've never succumbed to anything all that bad, but I did sport black sharpie "slashes" on an arm, for a short stretch, mostly to remind myself of who I was. FULLY. WILDLY. DEFIANTLY. ALIVE, ALIVE, ALIVE!

Best to all, Helen

Old lady H · · Boise, ID · Joined Aug 2015 · Points: 385

Bumping, to ask if anyone has further thoughts on partnering with people with bipolar, PTSD, anxiety... I seem to be acquiring more than a few friends who have battles I can't even comprehend. All I know for sure, is how much climbing helps me stay somewhere sorta more or less reasonable. A lot of that is taking care of the body that houses the beat up brain. 

Any reading anyone recommends? Online stuff?

Thanks! I wanna be part of the positive in my friend's lives. My climbers mean a great deal to me.

Best, Helen

pigsflyinsd · · San Diego, CA · Joined Jun 2015 · Points: 445
Old lady H wrote: Bumping, to ask if anyone has further thoughts on partnering with people with bipolar, PTSD, anxiety... I seem to be acquiring more than a few friends who have battles I can't even comprehend. All I know for sure, is how much climbing helps me stay somewhere sorta more or less reasonable. A lot of that is taking care of the body that houses the beat up brain.

Any reading anyone recommends? Online stuff?

Thanks! I wanna be part of the positive in my friend's lives. My climbers mean a great deal to me.

Best, Helen

I have no issues with this whatsoever. Some of my best adventures and conversations have been with friends who had, or are still dealing with issues. Some were suicidal and thankfully failed in their attempts. They are considerate and kind people who just have demons they cannot exorcise.  I miss some dearly.  Some people appear to be social butterflies one minute and have million dollar smiles but you just don't realize they're just hiding a lot of pain. Relationship issues seem to exacerbate the depression spells and prolong it. 


Fritz, I didn't see your thread when originally posted but noticed you're still active. I hope that you're managing, and doing well. Glad you have support, and sought treatment.  Depression is a real bitch but for me the mountains hold it at bay.  It's not the solution but definitely a reprieve from the mess in the head. The challenge and sometimes the physical pain lessens the pain in the noggin, and let's you gain enough composure for the episode to subside.  Glad you don't solo. The two are definitely not compatible. Best wishes to you and yours. 
Deirdre · · Unknown Hometown · Joined Jun 2016 · Points: 10

OLH,

I have no problem climbing with people who have anxiety, PTSD, etc. I'm neurodiverse myself - on the autism spectrum. It probably would be a good idea to have an honest conversation about triggers first especially if climbing outside. It isn't climbing related, but I found reading Asperger Syndrome and Anxiety helped. It is by Nick Durbin. I think there's a lot in there for folks who are not on the spectrum as well.

Fritz- I hope that all is going well. 
 

Tim Stich · · Colorado Springs, Colorado · Joined Jan 2001 · Points: 1,470

Hey there, Fritz!

Yes, a family member of mine was diagnosed at age twenty back before there were any real medications. The abundance of psychoactive drugs available now are overwhelming, but many years ago all you could do was get electroshock therapy which lasted about a month. At least you have a lot of drugs to try if one doesn't work for you, aside from the lithium which they keep most bipolar people on. I'm not sure what's special about lithium, but it is. Keep seeing a therapist in conjunction with your meds. It sounds like you can tell now if you are entering an episode of mania, which is also good.  

Señor Arroz · · Unknown Hometown · Joined Jan 2016 · Points: 10

No personal experience with that but I just want to wish you the best and thank you for being brave and posting this here.

Guideline #1: Don't be a jerk.

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