Drilling


Original Post
shredability · · Unknown Hometown · Joined Aug 2016 · Points: 0

Hey guys,

I'm relatively new to developing and was wondering how you typically drill for bolts. I've mucked out a spot in the forest where I can practice on a slab of granite before I do anything serious.

I used a standard 18V cordless drill w/ a mason drill bit and it didn't go so well (I just winged it so didn't really have high hopes). It took about 15 minuets and at the end I had two dead batteries and a hole ruffly 1" deep.

I'm thinking the first thing I need is a cordless 20V+ hammer drill.

I've done lots of research, but I've never heard anyone talk about:

1. Coolant
Typically when people cut/drill stone they'll use a cutting fluid or lubricant, is this not needed?

2. Types of rock
Are there any special requirements for granite?

Thanks :)

Ryan Surface · · Kansas City · Joined May 2014 · Points: 370

Nice try. I find 10W-40 good for sandstone, but in granite you can probably get by with 5W-30.

Bill Czajkowski · · Albuquerque, NM · Joined Oct 2008 · Points: 30

here's a better question - why don't drills come in odd valued voltages anymore?

And yes, it is a better question.

Nolan Huther · · Clarkson University · Joined Dec 2014 · Points: 607
Bill Czajkowski wrote:here's a better question - why don't drills come in odd valued voltages anymore? And yes, it is a better question.
Even numbers seem more professional and scientific. With odd numbers, there is the subtle sense that something is left over and unfinished or sloppily done.

In my opinion.
Ken Noyce · · Layton, UT · Joined Aug 2010 · Points: 2,067

"I used a standard 18V cordless drill w/ a mason drill bit and it didn't go so well (I just winged it so didn't really have high hopes).
.
.
.
I'm thinking the first thing I need is a cordless 20V+ hammer drill."

Well, using a standard drill was your problem, and no, using a 20V+ hammer drill isn't the answer. You need a rotary hammer drill or roto-hammer drill to be able to drill for bolts, and no this isn't the same as a hammer drill. 18 volts is fine, and I know people who even use 12V drills with success as long as it's a rotary hammer drill. Personally I use a 36V, but what matters is the impact energy, not the voltage.

Oh, and find someone who knows what they are doing to show you the ropes before you go installing dangerous bolts due to lack of incredibly basic knowledge.

Benjamin Chapman · · Small Town, USA · Joined Jan 2007 · Points: 13,267

shredability...you need a ROTARY hammer drill...and SDS bits would be optimal.
Check out the instructional videos that Kevin Daniels has at fixehardware.com

Stich · · Colorado Springs, Colorado · Joined Jan 2001 · Points: 1,470

Better yet, drill into a large rock to practice. With modern wedge and expansion bolts, you simply have to drill deep enough. Too shallow and that thing is going to stick out. Measure the depth you need for the bolt first. I used to mark my drill bits to the correct depth.

SW Marlatt · · Arvada, CO · Joined Feb 2006 · Points: 50
shredability wrote:It took about 15 minuets and at the end I had two dead batteries and a hole ruffly 1" deep.
You probably shouldn't be using minuets - too slow, too stately. If you are set on drilling to classical dance, you might use a gavotte or maybe a rigaudon - something quick and lively.

That said, I'm impressed that you obtained a ruffly hole - getting the ruff collar if difficult, but shows a real dedication to Renaissance drilling.
shredability · · Unknown Hometown · Joined Aug 2016 · Points: 0

Thanks guys!

I'm looking into rotary hammer drills now. I'm practicing on a large boulder I've found in the forest, I won't be drilling anything serious before my stuff gets checked out by a seasoned developer!

bruce lella · · Unknown Hometown · Joined Mar 2008 · Points: 3

BRAVO Marlatt!

Tradgic Yogurt · · Unknown Hometown · Joined May 2016 · Points: 55

Marlatt, I don't think you were baroque enough :D

Guideline #1: Don't be a jerk.

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