What diameter rope for the nose?


Original Post
Brett Millard · Jul 31, 2016 · Unknown Hometown · Joined Jul 2016 · Points: 0
Last time I climbed El Cap (2001), everyone was using a 10.5mm lead line if not an 11mm. I cant find much over 9.8mm these days. Is one of these new skinny lines up for the abuse of a big wall?

DrRockso · Jul 31, 2016 · Red River Gorge, KY · Joined Sep 2013 · Points: 168
10.2 mm to 10.5mm is pretty common. Most rope manufacturers still carry 10.5's,
http://lmgtfy.com/?q=10.5mm+dynamic+rope The Maxim Glider is one of the more popular ones.

ShireSmitty · Aug 1, 2016 · Boulda · Joined Jan 2013 · Points: 0
The Sterling Marathon 10.1 and the Mammut Supersafe 10.2 are my 2 go to ropes for leading on El Cap. They're both thick cords with a lot of sheath mass tor all those wandering pitches and edges that are common on the captain. Both are workhorses and both are commonly used up there.

John Wilder · Aug 1, 2016 · Las Vegas, NV · Joined Feb 2004 · Points: 1,495
If you're going wall-style, take something in the 10.2mm range.

If you're going IAD, you can get away with a 9.4-9.8, depending on your tolerances.

Ryan Hamilton · Aug 1, 2016 · Orem · Joined Aug 2011 · Points: 0
+1 for the Maxim Glider 10.2. I've used it for lots of dirty aid climbing in the Fisher Towers. I just picked up a Glider 10.5 for my trip up the Nose this year. They handle abuse well and run through belay devices smoothly.

20 kN · Aug 1, 2016 · Hawaii · Joined Feb 2009 · Points: 1,123
I used a 10.5mm Glider. If I did it again I would probably use the 9.9mm Glider instead. I wouldent go any thinner. Low 10mm is typical for El Cap walls that are largely free climbing based.

Brett Millard · Aug 2, 2016 · Unknown Hometown · Joined Jul 2016 · Points: 0
Sounds like a lot of people like the Maxim Glider. Do they still make a 10.5mm one though? I only see the 10.2mm option online.

Anyone used the Maxim Apex 10.5mm?

nkane · Aug 2, 2016 · Unknown Hometown · Joined Jun 2013 · Points: 75
I used 9.4s for both the lead and haul line. No one died.

John Tex · Aug 2, 2016 · Estes · Joined Mar 2013 · Points: 0
But yer gonna.

Ryan Hamilton · Aug 8, 2016 · Orem · Joined Aug 2011 · Points: 0
Brett Millard wrote:Sounds like a lot of people like the Maxim Glider. Do they still make a 10.5mm one though? I only see the 10.2mm option online. Anyone used the Maxim Apex 10.5mm?
I just got the 10.5 Glider, so they still make them. But if you can't find the 10.5, the 10.2 Glider is a great rope and would probably be more than fine for the Nose.

J.Roatch · Aug 8, 2016 · Leavenworth, WA · Joined Oct 2010 · Points: 0
Is the nose that unique? If you're not climbing at your limit, I'd go with a 9.5 as I do for my escapades in the cascadian alpine here in Washington. It's also granite here with a bit of wandering depending on the route.

Ropes have come a long way. Do people use twin ropes for the nose if it's so wandering I'd think that'd be a good idea. Do some twin 8.8 or something.

Nick Sweeney · Aug 8, 2016 · Spokane, WA · Joined Jun 2013 · Points: 605
J.Roatch wrote:Is the nose that unique? If you're not climbing at your limit, I'd go with a 9.5 as I do for my escapades in the cascadian alpine here in Washington. It's also granite here with a bit of wandering depending on the route. Ropes have come a long way. Do people use twin ropes for the nose if it's so wandering I'd think that'd be a good idea. Do some twin 8.8 or something.
That feeling when you clearly don't know what you are talking about.

Shelton Hatfield · Aug 8, 2016 · Unknown Hometown · Joined Apr 2011 · Points: 140
Nick Sweeney wrote: That feeling when you clearly don't know what you are talking about.
Lol. The only situation I can think of in which taking twins on the Nose wouldn't be a terrible idea would be if you were leaving the jugs on the ground. And even then I still think it's a bad idea. The only benefit of twins on the Nose is having two ropes to facilitate a cheap bail when you realize you have no idea what you're doing.

And to answer the OP, modern 9.8 ropes are up to the task IMO

ze_dirtbag · Aug 8, 2016 · TBD · Joined Jun 2012 · Points: 5
A 9.5-9.8 will be fine. If you're going to free some of it, you'll notice the weight difference. If you'll be standing in aiders, not as much. Climb smart and you probably won't die.

john strand · Aug 8, 2016 · southern colo · Joined May 2008 · Points: 1,575
First time i used a Mammut 10.5 very solid..second time a Mammut 10mm Galaxy,,noticed it a bit, but we were going faster as well so it wasn't bad...and not doing any hauling either.

Ryan Hamilton · Aug 8, 2016 · Orem · Joined Aug 2011 · Points: 0
J.Roatch wrote:Is the nose that unique? If you're not climbing at your limit, I'd go with a 9.5 as I do for my escapades in the cascadian alpine here in Washington. It's also granite here with a bit of wandering depending on the route. Ropes have come a long way. Do people use twin ropes for the nose if it's so wandering I'd think that'd be a good idea. Do some twin 8.8 or something.
If it was just free climbing then yes a 9.5 would be fine (I usually climb on a 9.4). Clearly you've never aid climbed or jugged up ropes as they move across rock edges. The 9.8 that was shredded to the core while jugging on The Titan tells me that I want something more up to the task of aiding and jugging up 30 pitches.

20 kN · Aug 8, 2016 · Hawaii · Joined Feb 2009 · Points: 1,123
Ryan Hamilton wrote: If it was just free climbing then yes a 9.5 would be fine (I usually climb on a 9.4). Clearly you've never aid climbed or jugged up ropes as they move across rock edges. The 9.8 that was shredded to the core while jugging on The Titan tells me that I want something more up to the task of aiding and jugging up 30 pitches.
Indeed a 9.5mm would not be a good choice for a wall rope if you're jugging. Ropes that thin are not well suited for abuse. You could shred a rope that thin in a single wall if you're not careful. I wouldent go below a 9.8mm personally, and a 10.2 is better suited for the riggors of wall use. The 9.9mm Maxim Glider would be perfect for a wall that has some aid and some free like the nose.

Squeak · Aug 8, 2016 · Perth West OZ · Joined Feb 2016 · Points: 3
Please excuse my ignorance, but why would a thicker rope be preferred on a long long route. Why not the thinner lighter ropes? OR Half or twins?

Shelton Hatfield · Aug 8, 2016 · Unknown Hometown · Joined Apr 2011 · Points: 140
Squeak wrote:Please excuse my ignorance, but why would a thicker rope be preferred on a long long route. Why not the thinner lighter ropes? OR Half or twins?
Because The Nose on El Cap, the route in question, is a bigwall that most climbers aid and jug on. Jugging on skinny lines is scary. A thicker rope is generally more resistant to abrasion. Ropes can get abraded while jugging, even sliced in half

Squeak · Aug 8, 2016 · Perth West OZ · Joined Feb 2016 · Points: 3
Shelton Hatfield wrote: Because The Nose on El Cap, the route in question, is a bigwall that most climbers aid and jug on. Jugging on skinny lines is scary. A thicker rope is generally more resistant to abrasion. Ropes can get abraded while jugging, even sliced in half
That makes sense, thanks :)

Brett Millard · Aug 15, 2016 · Unknown Hometown · Joined Jul 2016 · Points: 0
I ended up ordering a Maxim Apex 10.5mm.

Took it out for a training day yesterday and aided 7-8 pitches and jumared up a few times and it felt great.

Nose is 12 days, gonna be hot....

Guideline #1: Don't be a jerk.

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