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Silvretta bindings


Original Post
webdog · · Unknown Hometown · Joined Feb 2009 · Points: 0

I've got a pair of 404's and these things are huge. What sort of skis ( waist, length, skins?) are people using? I was thinking of something with a fish scale pattern so I wouldn't have to use skins but do BC cross country skis even come that wide?

Luc-514 · · Montreal, Quebec · Joined Nov 2006 · Points: 9,082

I'd buy them off of you if they're intact.
But generally for Backcountry or A/T skis.

jon jugenheimer · · Madison, WI · Joined Apr 2006 · Points: 2,149

The answer is yes. I have mine mounted on a pair of 10th Mountains from Karhu.

Dobson · · Butte, MT · Joined Oct 2011 · Points: 215
webdog wrote:I've got a pair of 404's and these things are huge. What sort of skis ( waist, length, skins?) are people using? I was thinking of something with a fish scale pattern so I wouldn't have to use skins but do BC cross country skis even come that wide?
In my experience, the skis under those bindings tend to all fit in the same category: old.

In assuming that you'll be skiing in your climbing boots, so downhill performance isn't a priority. Light weight, cheap, and a reasonably maneuverable length are what is important. Most of the ski approaches I do aren't terribly steep (logging roads, summer trails), so I like to use a skin that glides really well. In my case, I made some tailless race skins which glide somewhere between XC skis and traditional skins. They get much better grip on the uphills than fish-scales, which I think is a big benefit.
Max Forbes · · Vermont & Colorado · Joined Jan 2014 · Points: 108

Mine are on Rossi BC 110's

C. Williams · · the Climber Cave · Joined Jul 2013 · Points: 1,116

I have a pair mounted to 170cm Madshus Annoms. Primary use is approach skiing but they will ski mellow powder if I use my A/T boots. I would go ahead and mount them to a metal edged b/c touring ski with scales. One thing to keep in mind with those bindings is the mounting pattern is super long. Make sure the ski is wood core or has a sufficiently long mounting plate. You don't want the heel piece ripping out.

Jon H · · MD/DC · Joined Nov 2009 · Points: 121
webdog wrote: I was thinking of something with a fish scale pattern so I wouldn't have to use skins....
Fishscales are a great choice, but you're still gonna need skins if the pitch gets over 10 degrees, i.e. it's a virtual guarantee you'll need skins.

And you can get fishscale skis up 125mm wide. Lots of options. Don't spend too much though. Eventually you'll grow to hate your Silvrettas and sell them (or just straight up toss them in the garbage), so save some money in the budget for future acquisition of a Dynafit-style binding setup.
Linnaeus · · NZ · Joined Aug 2011 · Points: 0
Jon H wrote:...Eventually you'll grow to hate your Silvrettas and sell them (or just straight up toss them in the garbage), so save some money in the budget for future acquisition of a Dynafit-style binding setup.
This might be true for dedicated backcountry skiing or ski touring, but if you just want to approach climbs they are the only thing in their class and work fine for that. I wouldn't toss them in the garbage... plenty of folks going to Alaska each spring look for Silvrettas.
Graham Johnson · · Unknown Hometown · Joined Apr 2006 · Points: 0

They're actually not the only bindings in their class - Fritschi made some around the same era. FT88's I think they're called. I've found them to be way more robust than my 404's (which I routinely had issues with)

Linnaeus · · NZ · Joined Aug 2011 · Points: 0

They are the only recent binding in their class, as Silvretta made them up into the late 2000's at least. Those old Fritschi (which do pop up on Ebay now and again) were from the 80's. Silvretta 500s, Easy-Go etc was being made after the whole industry had switched to different binding designs, i.e. the Frtischi Diamer series. That's not so say there aren't some other exceptions, but certainly none as commonplace as the Silvretta. I have never owned or used the FT-88's, but I have seen them in action, and I would trust my 500s over them any day. As I recall, the FT-88's require stepping out of the binding to switch between ski and tour modes also, which gets old quickly. Per Wildsnow, they also weigh 1.2kg per binding! That's almost a pound heavier per foot than a Silvretta 500. For reference, I have skied Dynafit's for year for dedicated touring, and I'm not advocating that the Silvretta's are anywhere near as nice as these for actual skiing -- but for specific uses each has it's place.

Manuel Díaz · · Unknown Hometown · Joined Aug 2016 · Points: 5
Luc-514 · · Montreal, Quebec · Joined Nov 2006 · Points: 9,082

Looks like a nice piece of cut up pipe!

Steven Kovalenko · · Calgary · Joined May 2014 · Points: 25
Linnaeus wrote: This might be true for dedicated backcountry skiing or ski touring, but if you just want to approach climbs they are the only thing in their class and work fine for that. I wouldn't toss them in the garbage... plenty of folks going to Alaska each spring look for Silvrettas.
After watching folks have issues with their Silvretta setup, and crash and flail with soft boots, I am perfectly happy skiing on a real lightweight ski setup and carrying my ice boots. I am also a skier (Canadian Rockies), so part of the joy of moving through the mountains is actually skiing in these places when approaching and leaving ice climbs.

It's not always good skiing getting into ice climbs, but it sure beats faceplanting on every turn in soft boots.

You want slightly short for your height, "fat enough", nimble skis, with Dynafit bindings. In my case, 170cm, 112/82/102mm underfoot. Fireroad and flat approaches are probably fine with a soft boot setup, but for real backcountry skiing approaches I recommend a real ski setup. Short kicker skins, or narrow width skinny skins will give you some extra speed.

I also like to think the additional control with real skis and boots is equivalent to knee ligament protection, in a real skiing situation. Saving weight feels so good until you break something, until it actually slows you down, or becomes frustrating. I like to think Silvrettas embody all of these characteristics if you have to actually ski them in soft boots.
chriss · · Unknown Hometown · Joined Dec 2007 · Points: 5
Manuel Díaz wrote:
"Koflach Boots Downhill adaptor"??

It is a cut-up 3" DWV long radius elbow. With a ski boot power strap and old crampon strap on the instep.
clint helander · · anchorage, alaska · Joined Dec 2007 · Points: 611

Man there's a lot of silvretta hate! Living in Alaska, where there are actually lots of approaches to climbs, I use silvrettas all the time. I would suggest getting something like the Rossignol BC 125 ski. I am 6' tall and ski the 165cm. They are wide underfoot, have scales and turn very well. Sure, they aren't my dynafit setup, but I just skied all over Denali in them.

Throw some Purcell Prussiks from the tip of the ski to behind your knee and it will vastly improve the ski performance!

RamseyClark · · Unknown Hometown · Joined Oct 2016 · Points: 40
Custom Military Dynastar approach skis with easygo 500 silvretta bindings
I have these dynastars with easygo 500 silvretta bindings. I bought 100 pairs of skis from the UK military but I couldn't find much information on these ones. I have 20 pairs of these. I spoke to the UK dynastar rep and he said they were probably made specifically for the military as they do not carry any model no's etc. I'm guessing they would be used for ski mountaineering / ski touring / approach skiing.
I am now looking to resell them but if any of you guys would be kind enough to let me know a bit more about them, what they might be useful for and how much I should be charging, I would be most grateful. I will be making a percentage donation to a uk mountain rescue charity and cancer research on the sale of the skis.
Many thanks
Guideline #1: Don't be a jerk.

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