Mountain Project Logo

Bergans vs Gregory


jfs · · Bend, OR · Joined Mar 2012 · Points: 10

A climbing pack is a completely different animal than a backpacking pack. If you want a pack designed for climbing, 95% of the packs on the market are junk. You want:

- Simple
- Tough
- Simple
- and light

- and simple

You can make almost any pack carry well enough if you load it properly. The suspension system does not need to be complicated.

Neither of the packs in the original post come close to my criteria for a climbing pack.

FourT6and2 · · San Francisco, CA · Joined Mar 2015 · Points: 45
jfs wrote:A climbing pack is a completely different animal than a backpacking pack. If you want a pack designed for climbing, 95% of the packs on the market are junk. You want: - Simple - Tough - Simple - and light - and simple You can make almost any pack carry well enough if you load it properly. The suspension system does not need to be complicated..
1) I'm not looking for a "climbing" pack. I'm looking for a comfortable pack that I can use for a variety of things, including hiking, travel, and hauling some gear to the crag... NOT to "climb" with.

2) I found what I'm looking for. The criteria here being me. You use what you want. I'll use what I want. Then we can all be happy. I have the pack I was looking for. Done deal. I won't be returning it because you or anybody else doesn't like my decision. That's silly.

3) I initially bought a "climbing" crag pack—the Grag Daddy. It's nothing but a duffle bag with straps. Useless for what I want. Returned it. And you can see I tried out a number of actual "climbing" packs (Black Diamond, Arcteryx, North Face, Patagonia, etc.) And I totally agree with you—the packs on the market designed for "climbing" are largely junk. They are either full of gimmicks or have straps and hip belts that are nothing but webbing and offer zero comfort/support.

There are two that stand out (to me) though: The Gregory Alpinisto and the Montane packs I posted above. But they are more in the way of alpine/mountaineering packs. BUT... so what. You can use them for whatever you want. Is there some law out there that says you can't? What makes one pack a "climbing" pack and another not? Size? Weight? Material? Straps? The pack I went with is no larger in physical size than the Crag Daddy I initially bought. It's not significantly heavier either. But it's more comfortable. Carries weight better.

The Baltoro is heavy. It is cumbersome. And that's why I didn't go with it. The Glittertind is closer to an alpine/mountaineering pack than anything. And it will work just fine for what I want. :)

"Neither of the packs in the original post come close to my criteria for a climbing pack"

The Baltoro is certainly not a climbing pack, agreed. The Glittertind... after using it... I wouldn't climb in it obviously. But it's much lighter and smaller than the Baltoro. And much more simple. But more comfortable and much lighter. It will work for what I want. If you want simple, light, and tough... get a duffle back and use that I guess. Or one of those ulta light packs made of Cuban Fiber / Dyneema. They are just sacks with straps. Should do the trick for you. Not for me.
Guideline #1: Don't be a jerk.

Post a Reply

Log In to Reply