Ropes: buy dry or not?


Original Post
Dmitriy Litvak · Feb 5, 2016 · Pacifica, CA · Joined May 2007 · Points: 25
Hello MP'ers,

I have a question about buying dry ropes for ice? I have heard that it's all a marketing ploy. The rope gets wet no matter what. The waterp-oofing agent get warned off rather quick.

What's your experience?
Thanks
D

Bill Shubert · Feb 5, 2016 · Lexington, MA · Joined Jul 2012 · Points: 50
My friend and I were climbing together shortly after rain. His rope was dry treated, mine wasn't. Both got in puddles. His was fine, mine became spongy and fat, it didn't feel right. I don't think it's a just a marketing ploy; my next rope will be dry treated.

Ray Pinpillage · Feb 5, 2016 · West Egg · Joined Jul 2010 · Points: 0
Dry coating wear off with time and ropes will wet out no matter what. However, I find that dry treated ropes take longer to get fuzzy and are generally more durable. A rope has to be well below $100 for me to buy a non dry rope.

eli poss · Feb 5, 2016 · Durango, Co · Joined May 2014 · Points: 136
it's not just a marketing ploy but you really don't need it unless you're doing ice or alpine. It will make the rope slightly more durable and will improve handling, but IMO it's not really worth an extra $30+

Matt N · Feb 5, 2016 · Santa Barbara, CA · Joined Oct 2010 · Points: 180
Ray Pinpillage wrote:Dry coating wear off with time and ropes will wet out no matter what. However, I find that dry treated ropes take longer to get fuzzy and are generally more durable. A rope has to be well below $100 for me to buy a non dry rope.
This.
I don't ice climb, but prefer dry (heck double dry when you score a deal) treated ropes. Seems to extend their life and they stay cleaner, longer.

Would make sense to not use your ice ropes on rock, though, to keep the treatment longer, if it actually mattered in your purchase.

Nick Votto · Feb 5, 2016 · Unknown Hometown · Joined Jul 2008 · Points: 80
I've always purchased dry treated ropes and at a certain point, in my opinion, after around 1.5 seasons on ice the rope tends to get wet no matter what. BUT that can also be pretty condition dependent, climbing wet snow here in the northeast can often wet through it pretty quick.

I also agree with Roy and Matt that dry ropes in general are more durable and the sheaths last longer, which is why I continue to buy

Andrew Mayer · Feb 5, 2016 · Unknown Hometown · Joined Nov 2010 · Points: 70
Ive only owned dry ropes for the aforementioned benefits but I think if I was going to buy a rope exclusively for cragging (where your presumably going to bail via a single lower/rappel in the event of rain), I would get a cheap non-dry rope.

otherwise dry treatment is worth it IMO.

20 kN · Feb 5, 2016 · Hawaii · Joined Feb 2009 · Points: 1,128
I would choose the non-dry option. The coating really does not last long if you're actually taking whips and using the rope as its designed. I bought a Beal Golden Dry rope once and within three weeks in Red Rocks it soaked up water like a sponge.

If your main concern is durability, choosing a rope with a high percentage of sheath will do far more than any dry coating ever will. Even if you reapply the dry coating after it wears off, it still wont make as much of a difference as simply selecting a more burly rope with a thicker sheath.

John Wilder · Feb 6, 2016 · Las Vegas, NV · Joined Feb 2004 · Points: 1,495
20 kN wrote:I would choose the non-dry option. The coating really does not last long if you're actually taking whips and using the rope as its designed. I bought a Beal Golden Dry rope once and within three weeks in Red Rocks it soaked up water like a sponge. If your main concern is durability, choosing a rope with a high percentage of sheath will do far more than any dry coating ever will. Even if you reapply the dry coating after it wears off, it still wont make as much of a difference as simply selecting a more burly rope with a thicker sheath.
Note that he's using them for ice climbing. Dry coats will last much longer on ice than they will on rock. Fewer falls, ice isn't as abrasive as rock, etc etc.

I wouldn't necessarily recommend dry ropes for rock, but I definitely would for ice as they are going to be exposed to more water and the environment is friendlier for the dry coat so it lasts longer.

20 kN · Feb 6, 2016 · Hawaii · Joined Feb 2009 · Points: 1,128
John Wilder wrote: Note that he's using them for ice climbing. Dry coats will last much longer on ice than they will on rock. Fewer falls, ice isn't as abrasive as rock, etc etc. I wouldn't necessarily recommend dry ropes for rock, but I definitely would for ice as they are going to be exposed to more water and the environment is friendlier for the dry coat so it lasts longer.
Missed that. In that case, dry is not a bad option.

bearbreeder · Feb 6, 2016 · Unknown Hometown · Joined Mar 2009 · Points: 25
Buy dry surface AND core treated ropes for good ole wetness (ice)

Pretty useless in that environment to have one without the other

The UIAA has a new dry rating which is supposed to be better ... Look for that marking if youre willing to spend the money

Save that tope exclusively for ice if you want the treatment to last awhile

Get a cheap non dry rope for rock

;)

Dmitriy Litvak · Feb 8, 2016 · Pacifica, CA · Joined May 2007 · Points: 25
Thanks peeps. I got Bluewater Excellence. Now, I have to figure out how I stay dry :)

Guideline #1: Don't be a jerk.

Post a Reply

Log In to Reply