Drying wet / icy climbing rope?


Original Post
Wesley Fowler · Jan 6, 2016 · Boulder, Colorado · Joined Aug 2013 · Points: 0
Hello! So my question gets interesting because I currently live in an SUV. I'm wondering if anyone has experience caring for a climbing rope during the winter and summer... I've recently struggled to get my rope to dry completely when temperatures rarely get above freezing Anyone know if prolonged dampness has a huge effect on a rope's strength once it's dry again? Also curious about how dramatic the effects of heat can be on a rope in the summer. I've always been told to not keep gear in my car, but if that's the only option how terrible is it really?

FrankPS · Jan 6, 2016 · Atascadero, CA · Joined Nov 2009 · Points: 15
I think it would be more important to keep your rope out of direct sunlight, when stored in your car, compared to the heat. No real evidence to support that, but UV rays can't be good for soft goods.

As far as prolonged wetness goes, I'd ask the manufacturer. Although you will get several opinions on MP, some of which will be, "The manufacturer just want's to cover their liability and sell you a new rope." I think it's worth asking the manufacturer, though.

Michael C · Jan 6, 2016 · New Jersey · Joined Jun 2011 · Points: 190
Wesley Fowler wrote:Hello! So my question gets interesting because I currently live in an SUV. I'm wondering if anyone has experience caring for a climbing rope during the winter and summer... I've recently struggled to get my rope to dry completely when temperatures rarely get above freezing Anyone know if prolonged dampness has a huge effect on a rope's strength once it's dry again? Also curious about how dramatic the effects of heat can be on a rope in the summer. I've always been told to not keep gear in my car, but if that's the only option how terrible is it really?
I had some recent rope issues unrelated to your post and found that calling the manufacturer is the easiest way to get these questions answered.

20 kN · Jan 6, 2016 · Hawaii · Joined Feb 2009 · Points: 1,128
Wesley Fowler wrote: Also curious about how dramatic the effects of heat can be on a rope in the summer.
The effects are negligible, if even measureable. Nylon melts at 460F and it doesesnt get anywhere near that hot in your car. I would be more concerned with Dyneema which melts at 290F or so, but even so it's still not much of a concern.

Hot, wet, frozen, whatever, you're fine. Nylon is a very resilient material and exposure to varying temps will not harm it and more than using it for its intended purpose will. Consider traveling climbers like Honnold. Their gear lives in their vehicles. A car's life is the only life their gear has ever known.

Ray Pinpillage · Jan 6, 2016 · West Egg · Joined Jul 2010 · Points: 0
When you turn on the heat in your SUV also turn on the AC. The AC will dry the air.

Wesley Fowler · Jan 8, 2016 · Boulder, Colorado · Joined Aug 2013 · Points: 0
Thanks everyone! I just need to stop being paranoid haha

Guideline #1: Don't be a jerk.

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