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Bringing real food for all day climbing


Original Post
JeffL · · Salt Lake City · Joined Jun 2012 · Points: 65

Looking for suggestions that get away from probars and gels that will keep me fueled for 12 to 20 hours of mostly continuous exertion. I can make jerky, bars, and gels work; but I'm wondering what can be a better choice for my body. Bonking and having a gurgling/upset stomach is not ideal.

Looking for things that are not overly heavy, if possible

JWong Wong · · Los Angeles, California · Joined Apr 2008 · Points: 10

I like to bring along spam musubi or other varieties of rice cakes. The saltiness of the spam really hits the spot late in the day. Scrambled egg and pickled japanese ginger is great and the ginger can help soothe the stomach.

Allen Lim at Skratch Labs has all kinds of recipes for rice cakes and other packable foods.

skratchlabs.com/blogs/news

The Call Of K2 Lou · · Squamish, BC · Joined Mar 2012 · Points: 20

Mother knows best: "Have an apple."

No-Bake Energy Bites:
rockyforkranchresort.com/sn…

Honey Stinger waffles are my personal fave.

doligo · · Unknown Hometown · Joined Sep 2008 · Points: 277

Single-pitch cragging or long routes?

Rigggs24 · · Denver, CO · Joined Oct 2009 · Points: 45

a couple P B & J and bananas

Dylan B. · · Unknown Hometown · Joined Mar 2006 · Points: 938

Salami, summer sausage or pepperoni and sharp cheddar cheese. If it's hot, make sure to carry it in a ziplock 'cause it gets greasy.

Dr. Long Arm · · Unknown Hometown · Joined Jun 2013 · Points: 15

I usually rack a turkey sandwich on my harness on long routes.

McHull · · Fairfield, PA · Joined Aug 2012 · Points: 250
Rigggs24 wrote: a couple P B & J and bananas
X2 but on
on mini wheat bagels. they'll end up less smushed in the bottom of your pack.

plus slim jims
Aleks Zebastian · · Boulder, CO · Joined Jul 2014 · Points: 175

Climbing friend,

High quality cheesesteaks for power-flash, and cold fish-heads out of bucket for more endurance style flash. You like, myah?

Kauait · · Sandy Utah · Joined Aug 2015 · Points: 0

Frozen water bottle. Wrap up your favorite perishables and wallahhhh. My buddies appreciate every time.

Scott McMahon · · Boulder, CO · Joined Feb 2006 · Points: 1,425
Rigggs24 wrote: a couple P B & J and bananas
I'm a huge fan of this for all my trips. Put it in a small Tupperware box. I like some heavy nut bread, chunky style.

Or an egg sandwich with cheese avocado sriracha, tomato, spinach.

Time for breakfast!
MikeBaker · · Unknown Hometown · Joined Jul 2015 · Points: 5

Tuna in sunflower oil comes in a large foil pack. Add 2 mayo and 2 mustard packets (get them from a fast food place) and you have 500-600 calories and real food, I eat this plain on all day mountaineering trips for lunch. You can also add crackers and smash them up into it.

I have found for long single day excursions I do best with a small breakfast on the way and a lunch like the tuna along with the bars and gels, your body will need easily digested sugars so you still need those bars and gels

Thomas Beck · · Las Vegas, Nevada · Joined Feb 2006 · Points: 1,040

The well crafted Tupperware-like container seems to rule for healthy food at the crag food: sport climbing and single pitch. Contents are covered in earlier posts.

On multi-pitch ...guess it depends on conditions and how long you are on the climb as to what and how much you take. I prefer fast and light. I don't like to climb with a pack. A double bagged quality zip lock baggy can substitute as a soft food container and seldom extrudes in your pack. I think REI or outdoor backpacking outlets sell a dedicated container.

If hauling then what you can bring to eat can have more variety.

I tend to stay away from sugars.. I dislike the sugar rush and subsequent bonk. YMMV.

In the desert I freeze my water bottles with 20 to 50% water and fill the remainder the morning of the climb. I recycle Powerade bottle for water bottles. Some of my buddies chill their Camelbacks the night before.

sanz · · Raleigh, NC · Joined Nov 2011 · Points: 220
Dr. Long Arm wrote:I usually rack a turkey sandwich on my harness on long routes.
+1
Luc-514 · · Montreal, Quebec · Joined Nov 2006 · Points: 8,986

Sandwich wrap, avocado, banana (early snack), gruyere, dried sausage, nuts.

RandyR · · Unknown Hometown · Joined Dec 2009 · Points: 40
JWong wrote:I like to bring along spam musubi or other varieties of rice cakes. The saltiness of the spam really hits the spot late in the day. Scrambled egg and pickled japanese ginger is great and the ginger can help soothe the stomach. Allen Lim at Skratch Labs has all kinds of recipes for rice cakes and other packable foods. skratchlabs.com/blogs/news
+1 on Allen Lim recipes. I've used his recipes for century rides, and no GI distress that I would routinely get from gels/bars. This cookbook is amazing:

feedzonecookbook.com/portab…
Joe Garibay · · Ventura, Ca · Joined Apr 2014 · Points: 90

Probably not what you're looking for but I used a bunch of military MRE's on a backpack trip once. They weren't terrible, also not delicious. Kinda heavy. Though I had a ton of energy and my friends were zonked out from elevation and their dehydrated foods. I was running circles around them. Hunting out good fishing spots and even hiking all around lakes at our camp while they laid in their tents.

Dave Carey · · Morrison, CO · Joined Apr 2011 · Points: 120

Gummy bears are amazing and cheap

SteveMarshall · · Unknown Hometown · Joined Jul 2014 · Points: 40

lately i bring a foil pack of tuna and an avocado, mush those 2 together in the foil pack and it makes a decent lunch that doesnt sit like a brick. bonus to bring some hot sauce (salt is useful on a long day).

i snack on small amounts of dried fruits throughout. apricots, dates, etc all work.

unfortunately i have a hard time keeping avocados and bananas from squishing in my pack so its more of a day-cragging lunch... need to find another solution. same goes for pbj, too squishy.

I seem to work best with a decently sized breakfast which is high in fat and protein, and then a slow-drip of carbs throughout the day.

Michael C · · New Jersey · Joined Jun 2011 · Points: 340

When I ice climb, I bring along a thermous with some hot soup. I suppose you could throw in some pasta...go heavy (and hot) and the sauce and maybe cook the pasta a little extra al dente and it should be somewhat decent for 4-5 hours. A good tip is to pour hot water into the thermous and get it warm before adding the hot food.

Daryl Allan · · Sierra Vista, AZ · Joined Sep 2006 · Points: 970

Being one with the metabolism of a hummingbird, I like to think of myself as an expert on this subject of keeping food close by. Here are some of my favorites for climbing..

Multi-pitch and/or cragging:

  • Premade tuna salad pouches and a couple slices of heavy grain/nut bread like grainiac
  • PB&J (or even better - almond butter and jelly) again with the heavy bread
  • Any bar (cliff, lara, power, Granola, etc, etc..)
  • Nuts - almond, cashews, any mix.. leave the chocolate out though; get's everything messy and it's just empty carbs/sugar.
  • Jerky of various types (turkey, beef, summer sausage etc)

Cragging:
  • Hummus with melba crackers, baby carrots, celery or other grain chip for dipping (optional: toss in a frozen water bottle to keep the hummus cool)
  • Grilled cheese with bacon on heavy bread [ideally] made that morning
  • Smoothie of some sort. Boathouse farms or Odwalla kind of stuff.
  • Zucchini or banana bread
Guideline #1: Don't be a jerk.

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