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Can prusiks be shock loaded?


NC Rock Climber · · The Oven, AKA Phoenix · Joined Dec 2009 · Points: 60
Jerel Lillywhite wrote:Hey guys, Thanks so much for looking into and helping to answer my question. Contrary to the beliefs of some in this forum, I did search on google for quite a while before coming to Mountain Project and asking for help. I just didn't know the best terms to search for. I had been searching for "prusik failure" and not coming up with much. Using many of the terms you guys posted I was able to find a lot more stuff. Also, with the links many of you posted I was able to answer all of my questions and think through the ideas I had been planning on using the prusiks for in the first place. I don't use Mountain Project much, but I would recommend that if the posts are becoming too repetitive for some people that they put the computer down and get outside and climb instead. I went twice this weekend climbing everything from fun from 10.as to some harder 12s. Great times. You should try it.
Awesome advice!
Ray Pinpillage · · West Egg · Joined Jul 2010 · Points: 180
Jerel Lillywhite wrote:Hey guys, Thanks so much for looking into and helping to answer my question. Contrary to the beliefs of some in this forum, I did search on google for quite a while before coming to Mountain Project and asking for help. I just didn't know the best terms to search for. I had been searching for "prusik failure" and not coming up with much. Using many of the terms you guys posted I was able to find a lot more stuff. Also, with the links many of you posted I was able to answer all of my questions and think through the ideas I had been planning on using the prusiks for in the first place. I don't use Mountain Project much, but I would recommend that if the posts are becoming too repetitive for some people that they put the computer down and get outside and climb instead. I went twice this weekend climbing everything from fun from 10.as to some harder 12s. Great times. You should try it.
You searched "prusik failure"? google.com/webhp?sourceid=c…

Result 6 is a link to an MP discussion from 2010 for a similar question with applicable answers. Result 1 and 7 directly answers your questions, all on page 1.
20 kN · · Unknown Hometown · Joined Feb 2009 · Points: 1,346
Ray Pinpillage wrote: There are a few climbing clubs in this area that set up fixed lines and then have clients use prusiks as a top rope belay. I haven't heard of anyone falling but it matches the the OP scenario. Short of keeping your hand on the hitch there is not real way for the prusik to reliably lock. I assume they think the climbing is easy enough that the chance of a fall is minimal. Here is a video of someone using the technique. youtube.com/watch?v=Dp3bfcj…
Yea, that's pretty sketchy for guides to be putting their clients "on belay" with that method. At the minimal I would use two separate prusiks, but really a double set of Micro Traxions is far safer.
The Blueprint Part Dank · · FEMA Region VIII · Joined Jun 2013 · Points: 460
Bear

Ray, Bearbreeder, when you're done with the volleyball game, let us know. (Don't worry, I have it on a good source that they use "personal anchor systems" for the net). Alternatively, I don't know, meet up and fight.

You can listen to Kenny Loggins while you engage in fisticuffs

Revvin' up your engine
Listen to her howlin' roar
Metal under tension
Beggin' you to touch and go.

On a highway to the danger zone these two guys are.

As to the OP, generally try to avoid situations in which a shock loaded prusik could likely end up having to make the difference between life and death. I can't see how that would be too difficult.
John Douglass · · Seattle, WA · Joined Sep 2010 · Points: 60

Royal Robbins improvised a dynamic prusik self-belay system to do the second ascent of Leaning Tower. Definitely a system in which "shock loading" could occur and certainly FF2 if he plunged right off the belay. Here is the excerpt:

"My system is working. The 11 mm climbing rope is tied to the bottom of the tree. I am attached to the rope by two prusik knots. These slip knots, made of 5/16 inch rope wrapped around my climbing line, slide easily up the rope but grip tight when weight is applied. Invented for ascending ropes, they’re also good – I’m betting – for holding falls. One knot should stop me, but I use two, in case one fails. The prusiks are connected to my swami belt – ten turns of 1 inch nylon webbing wrapped around my waist, making a wide band that will cushion a fall much better than would a single loop of rope." p27, To Be Brave, Royal Robbins

Good book. Much better than most internet forums ;)

Guideline #1: Don't be a jerk.

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