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What do you think of this model for a basement woody?


Original Post
jonathan.lipkin · · Brooklyn, NY · Joined Dec 2012 · Points: 70

I'm going to build a woody in my basement. The ceiling is only 94" high, though I can build pretty long. I'm going to be far from a gym and crag for a few weeks over the summer, so need something to train on and to keep busy.

So far, I plan to put in a corner with about 12' on one wall and 14-15' on the other. The 12' wall will be completely vertical so my two daughters can climb on it-they don't like overhanging stuff yet. The corner will have a piece of ply at an angle so the two walls don't meet at 90 deg. The 14' wall will have some overhanging sections - one at 30, the other at 45.

I can also set holds along the joists, which are exposed and run in the same direction as the 90 degree wall.

Any feedback would be appreciated - is this overhang the right amount? What about the piece in the corner? Necessary? Helpful?

Scale-ish model

Top view

Another view

Detail of overhangs
Jon Zucco · · Denver, CO · Joined Aug 2008 · Points: 245

I would tilt one of those 90 degree sections 5-10 degrees in either direction. Either make a good slab wall or a slightly overhung face. Right now, it looks like too much straight vertical footage to me. You'll probably want some space that is between vert and 30 degress overhung, like 15 degrees or so. Looks super rad though!

Gunkiemike · · Unknown Hometown · Joined Jul 2009 · Points: 2,750

8 inches is too short for the kicker plate. Go 18-24". And ditto the above re. vertical sections being not so fun. Consider an inverted staircase of 12" tall vertical panels that step out 6-8" on each tier. That way it's steep (i.e. you get strong abs) yet you can still use slopers and small holds.

Mike Lane · · Centennial, CO · Joined Jan 2006 · Points: 905

Some model building beta:
Get some 1/8" or 1/4" foam core board from an art/drafting supply store. Cut with a straight edge and X-Acto knives. Use straight pins to tack sections together. Use an architect's scale to design things to scale, ie: 1/4" ='s 1'-0".
This is a very effective way to work out the bugs, such as the corner-connection issues I see with your "model".
You can translate your model's dimensions to actual ones with scaling and save tons of time on design and layout. If you are going to fork over some $$$'s for your wall, this is a tiny investment with big payoff

NorCalNomad · · San Francisco · Joined Oct 2011 · Points: 105
Mike Lane wrote:Some model building beta: Get some 1/8" or 1/4" foam core board from an art/drafting supply store. Cut with a straight edge and X-Acto knives. Use straight pins to tack sections together. Use an architect's scale to design things to scale, ie: 1/4" ='s 1'-0". This is a very effective way to work out the bugs, such as the corner-connection issues I see with your "model". You can translate your model's dimensions to actual ones with scaling and save tons of time on design and layout. If you are going to fork over some $$$'s for your wall, this is a tiny investment with big payoff
Not sure where you are getting your foamcore but it comes in standard sizes of 3/16" and 1/2" (also seen 3/32" foamcore).

But this advice is where it's at. Cause right now your model has some serious craftsmanship problems :P
Mike Lane · · Centennial, CO · Joined Jan 2006 · Points: 905

^^^ Thanks. Design school 1986. Long time ago.

NorCalNomad · · San Francisco · Joined Oct 2011 · Points: 105

No worries :P Arch or IDS?

Still crazy to wrap my mind around the fact that I spend almost $200 a year on foamcore

Jon Zucco · · Denver, CO · Joined Aug 2008 · Points: 245
Gunkiemike wrote:Consider an inverted staircase of 12" tall vertical panels that step out 6-8" on each tier. That way it's steep (i.e. you get strong abs) yet you can still use slopers and small holds.
good advice. you'll want the capability to work on smaller holds and hard slopers without such a severe overhang. The staircase idea, a less inverted wall (15 deg) or both will serve you well.
Mike Lane · · Centennial, CO · Joined Jan 2006 · Points: 905
NorCalNomad wrote:No worries :P Arch or IDS?
A Master's in IDS, but the program was a total fraud. 2nd year I was drafted (did not want the title) to be the ASID student chapter president; which led to me explaining to the real ASID why UC/Denver was churning out idiots. Long story short- accreditation pulled and I became a plumber to pay off the loans.
But you know the theme a lot of Chipotle restaurants have with the corrugated steel and Mayan iconography? That was my idea, did a nightclub model on that in '86. The Arch students used to come down and critique the model, pretty sure one of them plagiarized me.
Guideline #1: Don't be a jerk.

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