Mountain Project Logo

For those of you with dogs on climbing trips


Greg D · · Here · Joined Apr 2006 · Points: 871

I find people have way more impact on the crags than dogs.

Dogs, please leave your human at home.

danulu · · Unknown Hometown · Joined Jan 2012 · Points: 45
Greg D wrote:Dogs, please leave your human at home.
Dogs should never be allowed in the wilderness, as they are not indigenous to these areas. These areas should only be visited by humans, and we should make every effort to erradicate all non-human animal life in the wild.
Ike Rushmoore · · Unknown Hometown · Joined Feb 2012 · Points: 0
The Larry wrote: Some dogs are good crag dogs some aren't.
I can't believe you're calling Steph Davis a dog.
Greg D · · Here · Joined Apr 2006 · Points: 871
danulu wrote: Dogs should never be allowed in the wilderness, as they are not indigenous to these areas. These areas should only be visited by humans, and we should make every effort to erradicate all non-human animal life in the wild.
This is funny on many levels.
s.price · · PS,CO · Joined Dec 2010 · Points: 1,348
danulu wrote: Dogs should never be allowed in the wilderness, as they are not indigenous to these areas. These areas should only be visited by humans, and we should make every effort to erradicate all non-human animal life in the wild.
This is ridiculous on many levels. I'll start leaving my dog at home when irresponsible parents start leaving their screaming,whining babies there as well. The crag is no place for a child too young or undisciplined to be there.
Rmsyll,you need a dog.
Vaughn · · Colorado · Joined Mar 2011 · Points: 50
Rmsyll wrote:Dogs have only two necessary interests: hunting for food, and hunting for sex, which can't be done legally or effectively at a climbing area. They piss everywhere they go, and rake up the ground if they shit. They dig holes that remain as further erosion..
You could say the same thing about humans.
Garrett Klingler · · Unknown Hometown · Joined Apr 2012 · Points: 0

Get a shock collar for your dog...they will act perfectly at the crag.

mitchy B · · nunya gotdamn business. · Joined Aug 2009 · Points: 0

shock collar or stick, when your dog starts pissin' you off just shock his ass or hit'em with a stick, sooner or later he'll get the picture.

FrankPS · · Atascadero, CA · Joined Nov 2009 · Points: 275
mitchy wrote:shock collar or stick, when your dog starts pissin' you off just shock his ass or hit'em with a stick, sooner or later he'll get the picture.
Do these techniques work with girlfriends?
s.price · · PS,CO · Joined Dec 2010 · Points: 1,348

Dogs aren't the problem. Lousy dog owners are.
Instead of shocking or hitting the dog as an owner you should take the time to train your animal properly. You would not let your kids get away with bad crag behavior, don't let your dog. A dog is only as good as it is trained to be. Like most humans. I believe a tazer to the leg of any lousy dog owner will bring them around. Probably work on your girlfriend as well Frank.

danulu · · Unknown Hometown · Joined Jan 2012 · Points: 45

Some dogs add class to the crag.

classy gent
bearbreeder · · Unknown Hometown · Joined Mar 2009 · Points: 3,065

i luv it when they bring doggays ... a quick protein fix after climbing does wonders ....

Princess Mia · · Vail · Joined May 2006 · Points: 410
FrankPS wrote: Do these techniques work with girlfriends?
No, but they work well with boyfriends......kind of the reverse Fifty Shades......
Elena Sera Jose · · colorado · Joined Mar 2012 · Points: 350

so there were 3 dogs at the crag all had different owners, everyone especially girls adored a fluffy pup and the dogs seem to have had a good time playing with each other. one dog was walking all over the rope i was belaying with ( not my rope) but the owner of the rope did not say anything (he does not say much in general) i did not say anything because i was kinda tired and frustrated at a 5.6 i could not lead earlier. The owner of the dog said something like: "oh u should not walk on those peoples rope", but it went no farther. If it was my rope or I was not so tired i would have said something about the dog walking on the rope. So the point im trying to make here is: if you are reading this thread please dont let your dog walk on other peoples rope, because if they are not really tired or trying to work a route and focus they may say something...unpleasant even.
p.s. now i feel guilty for not saying something about that guys rope being walked on.

Elena Sera Jose · · colorado · Joined Mar 2012 · Points: 350
Jake Jones · · Richmond, VA · Joined Jul 2011 · Points: 1,475
FrankPS wrote: Do these techniques work with girlfriends?
Yes, but only the Eastern European ones.
mitchy B · · nunya gotdamn business. · Joined Aug 2009 · Points: 0

Usually a back hand works pretty well.

Alex Washburne · · Unknown Hometown · Joined Apr 2010 · Points: 65

I liked that (typo?) in the beginning: there are crag dogs and there are drag dogs. I'm a firm believer that proper training can go a long ways to change a dog's temperament, but I'm also not a trained dog trainer.

I have a husky too, and he's very chill at crags. I've had a lot of people compliment him and his very quiet, reserved personality at the crags. A big part of it is that I was lucky to have picked out a very loving dog to begin with - as I walked out of the pound on day 1 with Jack, he submissively (ears down, head & tail low) approached a toddler and licked her gently on the chin.

That said, I also spent a long time taking Jack to social situations before taking him to a crag. Continually introduce your dog to new people and new situations, and be ready to risk being the asshole who's lecturing their dog in company - it sucks at first, but it's better to be that asshole for a year than to be the pathetic mediator who pets their snarling, rabid dog while saying to the stranger "It's okay, Snookie's friendly".

Also, I'm not sure if it's been said yet, but there's one thing that's definitely worth consideration: even if the dog behaves well, the risk of falling objects (rocks, biners, people) that can permanently damage or kill the dog should give us pause. The risk can be mitigated slightly by choosing well-protected spots to leash up the pup, but it's still a risk that should we should know we're taking when we bring our best friends to the crag.

Good luck with the training!

Elena Sera Jose · · colorado · Joined Mar 2012 · Points: 350
mitchy wrote:Usually a back hand works pretty well.
Very shovenistic comment. It's a shame in this day and age t his is the way of thinking in some cases of a pathetic attempt at machismo.
Elena Sera Jose · · colorado · Joined Mar 2012 · Points: 350
Jake Jones wrote: Yes, but only the Eastern European ones.
Not only shovenist but also a prejudiced person with a very closed mind who probably does not even know a single Eastern European woman personally. This is not a joke.
Guideline #1: Don't be a jerk.

Post a Reply to "For those of you with dogs on climbing trips"
in the General Climbing

Log In to Reply