Climbing wall addition


Original Post
Kevin Brooks Henry · · Minneapolis, MN · Joined Jan 2010 · Points: 685
Kevin Brooks Henry · · Minneapolis, MN · Joined Jan 2010 · Points: 685

Anyone?

Joe Kreidel · · San Antonio, TX · Joined Dec 2007 · Points: 1,515

Personally, with just 8x8 of climbing space (the size of my wall) I would prefer it to be all one angle. Maybe settle for somewhere in the middle, maybe 30 degrees. With limited space, and two angles, you will end up doing a lot of the same moves on the arete and in the dihedral. What might work better to give you more flexibility in setting, would be to build the wall one angle and then build a symmetrical volume in the center-top portion of the wall. Just my thoughts...but good luck!

Andy Librande · · Denver, CO · Joined Nov 2005 · Points: 1,865

Yeah with that small of space you should just tilt the whole thing at least 20 degrees if not 30 degrees. With a flat wall all you can really work on is technique and minor strength training which with a home woody I feel strength is the thing you want to work on primarily.

The arete on the side will be really awesome and something I highly encourage.

Also if possible you should add a 4'x8'panel to the roof just so you get an extra two moves on the roof which will add a lot to your wall.

For example the wall below was roughly 8 ft wide by 12 ft long(at the highest and 10 feet at the shortest) and adding the 4ft or so onto the roof really made it that much more exciting and makes it feel like you actually climbed a full problem.

Climbing Wall #3: (RIP: 2007-2008): Repurposed from wall #1. Great garage, freestanding, 30 degrees, ~10ft high.

Kevin Stricker · · Evergreen, CO · Joined Oct 2002 · Points: 555

2x4's are not rated for structural use.....for any wall mounted to your wall the joists are loaded similar to a floor and need to be 2x6 doug fir at minimum, preferably 2x8. Not a huge difference in price, they are much straighter, and will keep things nice and rigid.

As for your design I think that 45 degree wall will become a hazard while bouldering on your main wall as it will stick way out into the room. I personally would make both of your right wall panels 30 degrees with a 12-18 inch kicker. This will make your right wall the "main wall" and your back wall will but into it. Check out the Metolius website for some beta on building your transition between the two walls.

Kevin Brooks Henry · · Minneapolis, MN · Joined Jan 2010 · Points: 685

bump

Jeremy Monahan · · Fort Fun, CO · Joined May 2002 · Points: 410

Can you provide a rough sketch of what your looking for? Are you going to add the triangular panel in the corner or on the left side of the existing panel?

I second Kevin's comment about 2x6 studs being used. You will experience a lot less creaking and movement with your wall. With your limited vertical space (judging from the picture), you will want to maximize the traversable space on your wall.

Also, make sure you use drop-in anchors to fasten studs to the concrete walls and floor. These are similar to expansion bolts, but you need a setting tool to properly install the anchor.

This is my first idea, done quickly in Sketchup. This program is free from Google, and is invaluable in mocking up a climbing wall or any other home improvement project.

Kevin Brooks Henry · · Minneapolis, MN · Joined Jan 2010 · Points: 685

Hey Jeremy, thanks a bunch for the sketch up. I was thinking something more along these lines though:

New wall idea

side view

Corey Morris · · Fort Sam Houston, TX · Joined Mar 2009 · Points: 225
Kevin Stricker wrote:2x4's are not rated for structural use.
LOL...
Peter Beal · · Boulder Colorado · Joined Jan 2001 · Points: 1,740

The issue if any with 2x4s is rigidity and noise but if the plywood is screwed on well, the whole ensemble will be perfectly usable. My advice is use string or studs and clamps to make a mock-up on site and adjust plans accordingly.

Do not waste a single square inch of the wall on vertical terrain. That includes a kickboard. Just put in a few good footholds down low. The Sketchup model will result in a wall that under utilizes the space. A single 8x8 wall at 30 degrees overhung is all you need. Maximizing the length if you can't raise the height any will allow better traversing and diagonaling problems.

Looking at your photo, you are working with a cellar. I would drop 2x8s at a 30 degree angle, more or less, parallel to and off the floor joists right in to what is probably a concrete floor (?). A carpenter friend of mine said don't bother anchoring the studs at the base, just let them rest on the floor. The weight of the climber, the wood and the holds will keep everything in place. That is what I did and it has worked just fine. Just make sure the wall is well-anchored at the top. I can post photos if you want.

P LaDouche · · CO · Joined Apr 2007 · Points: 15
Kevin Stricker wrote:2x4's are not rated for structural use.....for any wall mounted to your wall the joists are loaded similar to a floor and need to be 2x6 doug fir at minimum, preferably 2x8.
Damn, I guess all those 3 story houses built with load bearing 2x4 walls should be torn down huh? MANY older houses roofs in the west were framed with 2x4s that are 20+ feet long.

Sorry, I've built 3-4 woodies with 12' long 2x4s and never had a problem. Its all in how you stagger and screw down the sheathing.

I'm a big fan of adjustable walls, who wants to be stuck at 30 degrees?
Shaun Greene · · www.UtahShaun.com · Joined Feb 2006 · Points: 445

After having built a number of climbing walls, I agree that vertical walls are generally a waste of space. In my past experience, these walls tend to be too short, lack variety, and contribute little to building any strength. I would build as much overhanging wall as possible and forego the vertical walls.

Since you have a relatively short height and width, I would not bother using anything but 2 x 4's

Kevin Brooks Henry · · Minneapolis, MN · Joined Jan 2010 · Points: 685

finally got the sketchup model on

Gunkiemike · · Unknown Hometown · Joined Jul 2009 · Points: 2,740

I can understand framing a wall with 2x6s or even 2x8s for a commercial gym, but this is total overkill for a home woodie. I have laughably lightweight wall in my garage: 2x3 framing (16" O.C.) and 5/8" plywood. It's been up for 16+ years and hasn't so much as creaked. If that doesn't scare you, many of my holds are fastened with 1/4-20 bolts. (Now THOSE creak!)

Kevin Stricker · · Evergreen, CO · Joined Oct 2002 · Points: 555

Most 2x4's available today are hem-fir, not doug fir and have very little strength when loaded laterally. You guys are confusing structural i.e decks and floors with vertical wall applications. 2x4's when spaced on 16" centers with doubled top and bottom plates makes a very strong wall, turn it on it's side and it is practically useless.

Anyways as others have noted once you attach the plywood you are dealing with a much stronger wall, the screwed plywood transfers force more similar to a web. It is still a liability to use 2x4's on steep walls, especially when a suitable material is available with such a small increase in price.

Kevin as to your design I think you will find the vertical wall to be pretty boring after a while. Also building the arete feature is going to take as much time as building the entire new wall.

Woodchuck ATC · · Unknown Hometown · Joined Nov 2007 · Points: 3,110

Talk about structural strange: My top sheet of plywood is standing vertically on it's edge with 2 flat side 2X4's mounted down the edges. It is attached at the bottom to the edge of my shed roof with 3 door hinges, so to fold up and down(village height restrictions). 2 more fir 2by4's are used as angled 'stilts' to hold it vertically in place. Think a 3,4,5 right triangle with the hypotenuse being the angled stilts to hold the vertical board from pulling over forward off the roof. We have a toprope anchor bolted onto the top edge of the sheet of plywood,with back up 2by6 across the sheet. After over 15 years and a couple replacement sheets, we have never had it fail, bend or break in holding up to 200lb climbers in thin air 26 ft high off the ground. An engineering disaster I'm sure, but it works for me.

Kevin Brooks Henry · · Minneapolis, MN · Joined Jan 2010 · Points: 685

bump

Kevin Brooks Henry · · Minneapolis, MN · Joined Jan 2010 · Points: 685
Willa wrote:The golden rule for home walls: NO VERT WALLS! Try to avoid building 'features' as well, like diamonds or aretes and such. 1 or 2 consistent, steep (25-55 degs.) angles are your best bet.
would like to, but due to the lack of space and the general layout of the ceiling and whatnot, it isn't possible to have all angles.
Kevin Brooks Henry · · Minneapolis, MN · Joined Jan 2010 · Points: 685

Finally! It's finished

New wall

Kevin Brooks Henry · · Minneapolis, MN · Joined Jan 2010 · Points: 685

last bump

Andy Librande · · Denver, CO · Joined Nov 2005 · Points: 1,865

Put a roof on that thing!

Put a roof addition on your steep at the top where there is the obvious cut, Start the new roof out at an low angle up to the ceiling rafters. Tie it into your green triangle volume, extend out to the light, and you can easily add 2-3 more moves on your wall!

Otherwise the wall looks really sweet. I miss not having an arete on my wall...

Guideline #1: Don't be a jerk.

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