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Ragged Mountain

Connecticut > Central Valley

Description

Ragged Mountain, est. 761 feet (232 m), is a traprock mountain ridge located 3 miles (5 km) west of New Britain, Connecticut in the town of Southington and Berlin, Connecticut. It is part of the narrow, linear Metacomet Ridge that extends from Long Island Sound near New Haven, Connecticut, north through the Connecticut River Valley of Massachusetts to the Vermont border. The mountain, a popular hiking and rock climbing attraction located between metropolitan Hartford and Meriden, is known for expansive vistas, vertical cliff faces, mountain ridge reservoirs, unique microclimate ecosystems, and rare plant communities. Ragged Mountain is traversed by the 51-mile (82 km) Metacomet Trail. - Wikipedia.org

Ragged Mountain is home to many fine crags, most of which are on private property, posted no trespassing, and have a history of landowner/climber tensions. To list just a few crags on Ragged Mountain for historical purposes:

Main cliff
Small Cliff
Outcrop Cliff
May Crack Block
Citadel
Owl's Lair
Junkyard
Wasp's Nest
Cathedral Rock
Shooting Gallery

Getting There

Mountain in Southington, CT. Recommended parking is in Timberlin Park. Follow trail north. There is also street parking on Sheldon Rd but parking is limited and one MUST NOT block driveways or park directly in front of people's homes.

Photos [Hide ALL Photos]

Gustavo Brillembourg leading YMC - 5.9 at Ragged Mt Main Cliff - May 1985
[Hide Photo] Gustavo Brillembourg leading YMC - 5.9 at Ragged Mt Main Cliff - May 1985
Kim Smith leading Run for Your Life 5.8 at the Spider Wall - May 1985
[Hide Photo] Kim Smith leading Run for Your Life 5.8 at the Spider Wall - May 1985
Rainsford Rouner leading Spider Crack - 5.9 at Spider Wall - May 1985
[Hide Photo] Rainsford Rouner leading Spider Crack - 5.9 at Spider Wall - May 1985
Andy Adams, Albert Dow, Dave Walters and Kim Smith after a fine day at Ragged - March 1979
[Hide Photo] Andy Adams, Albert Dow, Dave Walters and Kim Smith after a fine day at Ragged - March 1979
Ragged Mountain Main Cliff looking left (north) in June.
[Hide Photo] Ragged Mountain Main Cliff looking left (north) in June.
Albert Dow taking a top rope on Hot Rocks at Ragger Mt Main Cliff - March 1979
[Hide Photo] Albert Dow taking a top rope on Hot Rocks at Ragger Mt Main Cliff - March 1979
Ragged Coon.  Don't TR on my trees!!
[Hide Photo] Ragged Coon. Don't TR on my trees!!
RMF Boundary Marker
[Hide Photo] RMF Boundary Marker
Kim Smith climbing in Wiessner Corner at Ragged Mt Main Cliff - March 1979
[Hide Photo] Kim Smith climbing in Wiessner Corner at Ragged Mt Main Cliff - March 1979

Comments [Hide ALL Comments]

Russ Keane
Salt Lake
[Hide Comment] I love Traprock! Such wonderful climbing. Aug 13, 2017
[Hide Comment] Are there any camping areas close to Ragged Mountain? Oct 17, 2017
David K
The Road, Sometimes Chattan…
[Hide Comment] A few of these climbs say "standard traprock rack" but there's no info on what that is. Dec 29, 2017
M Mobley
Bar Harbor, ME
[Hide Comment] David that is the question everyone wants to know. Some think its triples, some say one of everything up to a #3 while others say all you need some hooks and duct tape. No approaches over 15 minutes and not too many climbs over 80' so... Dec 30, 2017
Jimmy Downhillinthesnow
Fort Collins, CO / Seattle, WA
[Hide Comment] A standard traprock rack definitely includes a large set of cojones. With some notable exceptions, I found the pro on many routes at Ragged tricky at best, imaginary at worst. Jan 3, 2018
Tobias Koch
Garmisch-Partenkirchen, DE
[Hide Comment] Pro is generally pretty good climbs are really fun. Found that a "standard traprock rack" is just a regular rack. Just a warning to bring long anchor cords to sling small trees very far away because the locals don't allow any bolts for anchors. Jul 24, 2023