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Why do you live in CO?
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By USBRIT
From Cumbria.UK
Apr 24, 2012
The Sword of Damocles.... a real Beauty. P. Ross on the summit. Palisade and I-70 below.

Because I get one if not the most doses of radiation in America..both from the sun and the large deposits of uranium .


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By mountainhick
From Black Hawk, CO
Apr 24, 2012

I live here because of destiny.

Didn't choose it per se, it just happened

now, inertia

No complaints. Very happy here


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By Bill Matlin
From Albuquerque, New Mexico
Apr 24, 2012
suffering

I know this is a CO thread, but what about Albuquerque / Santa Fe. You have the Labs, e.g. Sandia and Los Alamos, and a few other high tech manufacturing such as Intel. The climbing is not bad and southern Colorado is just up the road. Underated I say.


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By Timmamok
From Durango, CO
Apr 24, 2012
crack at undisclosed location - my little proj

I ended up in Durango due to my job. I had never considered living in Colorado long term prior to the job. I don't regret it. This town has everything I could ask for in a place to live. I'm not terribly excited about my current representation in congress but those things change over time.


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By The Good Life Denver
Apr 25, 2012
<a href='http://www.thegoodlifedenver.com' target='_blank' rel='nofollow' >www.thegoodlifedenver.com</a>

I moved to Denver after biking across the country, passing through Colorado, and falling in love with it. It's the best place to work, play, and live.


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By Hank Caylor
Administrator
From Golden, CO
Apr 25, 2012
Lone goat..

I dumped a stripper in Austin and they don't like that too much, so I moved to Boulder and just never left.


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By J Miles
From Queensbury, NY
Apr 25, 2012
Flatirons

Thanks for your response Brandon!

Brandon Howard wrote:
Such cannot be said for the people. I have lived in Rochester for all my life and it has become apparent that most people around here are concerned about themselves first, and their personal status second. This runs very contrary to almost everyone I ran into or met in Colorado. Every bar that I went into I could have a conversation with nearly every person in it.


This reminded me of a jaw dropping experience that my wife and I had while buying groceries in Estes Park last March. After we finished paying for our 2-3 bags worth of food the lady who had bagged our food (probably in her 40s) asked us if we would like help taking our bags to our car. I was totally shocked because I don't think I've ever had anyone offer to do that before. Even more shocking was that she would ask 2 healthy looking people in their early 20s that question when they only had 2-3 bags. That experience combined with the view that I saw from the parking lot made me consider moving to CO even more.


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By handon broward
From Rochester, NY / Aspen, CO
Apr 25, 2012
Elk Range, CO

J Miles wrote:
Thanks for your response Brandon! This reminded me of a jaw dropping experience that my wife and I had while buying groceries in Estes Park last March. After we finished paying for our 2-3 bags worth of food the lady who had bagged our food (probably in her 40s) asked us if we would like help taking our bags to our car. I was totally shocked because I don't think I've ever had anyone offer to do that before. Even more shocking was that she would ask 2 healthy looking people in their early 20s that question when they only had 2-3 bags. That experience combined with the view that I saw from the parking lot made me consider moving to CO even more.


Yea man I was blown away by how nice everyone is out there. Any person is willing to take time out of their day to help you for a few minutes or answer a question. Quote the opposite of NY.


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By Jeff Chrisler
From Boulder, CO
Apr 25, 2012

A few reasons why I love living in CO..
1. As much as people love to talk about how much Boulderites are assholes, I've had nothing but the opposite experience in the 3 years I have been here. Perhaps the pro climbers and uber fit are a bit intimidating so it's easy to call them cocky asshats, but I've found that once you start a conversation, it's been a pleasure for the most part. Coming from the MD/DC/VA area, those asshats are far worse and more prevalent.
2. A high concentration of trails for running and biking. Getting around here is easy and relatively safe. The trails are awesome.
3. Climbing year round is possible, but skiing is usually awaesome in the winter... except this past winter, but still tons better than most places.
4. Some of the best restaurants and breweries in a small concentrated place. Nuff said.
5. People have a priority to be fit and outside. This breeds a community fostering athletics and fitness. Perhaps a bit over the top at times, but it helps you get your butt outside on those days when you would in many other places not have that same pull.
6. The warm, dry weather rocks. Even in the hotness of the summer, it's dry enough to go out for a run.
7. Close to RMNP, the Wind River Range, Moab, Jackson Hole (ok, 8 hours or so), Salt Lake... etc
8. If you're into gambling, it's fun to hit up Blackhawk now and then.
9. Great climbing. A bunch of different areas close by and far away. Some of the best alpine bouldering in the country, and still a ton more to develop...


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By Evan S
From Erie, CO
Apr 25, 2012
Me, of course

One of my Dad's friends and climbing partners is a science teacher at a private Boulder high school. Their facility was in financial trouble this last year and may have had to shut down. Despite decades of experience he was literally looking at moving to Central America to teach for a couple years before he retires because he was convinced there was no way he could get another decent job on the Front Range. I have also heard from other teachers in the area there are 50-100 applicants for every open position.

I'm not trying to dissuade you from moving here, I think the only other place I would want to live is Taos, NM, but the teaching jobs will probably be an issue. At least at first.


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By The Good Life Denver
Apr 25, 2012
<a href='http://www.thegoodlifedenver.com' target='_blank' rel='nofollow' >www.thegoodlifedenver.com</a>

+1 to everything Jeff Chrisler said. With regard to teaching job availability, it depends on the district, but it is pretty competitive right now. It is true that in some districts you do have to submit upwards of 50 applications to get a job. There is always a demand for experienced teachers who have the data to show that they get great results, though.


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By J Miles
From Queensbury, NY
Apr 25, 2012
Flatirons

After reading through all of these awesome posts and comparing CO to upstate NY the weather seems to be the most important difference for me. Looking at weather data from sites like city-data.com the weather doesn't look that different, but I have a feeling that I'm either missing something when looking at the data, or the two are actually closer that I think. The biggest differences that I see is that CO is less humid and has more sunny days (temps seem comparable).

Can anyone who has spent a large amount of time in both areas let me know how the two compare?

Also, what % of the time do you find yourself staying inside because of the weather due to rain, sleet, heat, humidity...? A good follow up to this question is how tolerant are you to these adverse conditions (if you don't mind the rain or heat then you will obviously be outside more than those who do)?

Thanks again everyone!


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By Jeremy Kasmann
From Denver, CO
Apr 25, 2012

J Miles wrote:
Also, what % of the time do you find yourself staying inside because of the weather due to rain, sleet, heat, humidity...? A good follow up to this question is how tolerant are you to these adverse conditions (if you don't mind the rain or heat then you will obviously be outside more than those who do)?


Heat and humidity are not really problems. 100+ degree days in Denver are reasonable at shady crags, even more so if you head to higher elevation crags. During the winter, crags that get a lot of sun are usually climbable.

Rain and sleet are rarely a problem. Storms are usually short and the rock dries out very quickly.


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By Monty
From Golden, CO
Apr 25, 2012
Just a teaser

The Beer... Oh and the Mountains too, I guess...


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By Ian Stewart
Apr 25, 2012

J Miles wrote:
After reading through all of these awesome posts and comparing CO to upstate NY the weather seems to be the most important difference for me. Looking at weather data from sites like city-data.com the weather doesn't look that different, but I have a feeling that I'm either missing something when looking at the data, or the two are actually closer that I think. The biggest differences that I see is that CO is less humid and has more sunny days (temps seem comparable). Can anyone who has spent a large amount of time in both areas let me know how the two compare? Also, what % of the time do you find yourself staying inside because of the weather due to rain, sleet, heat, humidity...? A good follow up to this question is how tolerant are you to these adverse conditions (if you don't mind the rain or heat then you will obviously be outside more than those who do)? Thanks again everyone!


I lived in Ontario, Canada for 20+ years (close enough to upstate NY), been in Colorado for 1 year.

Before moving here I tried looking through all of the weather data I could to try to see the "real picture". The data didn't tell me anything, and on paper it didn't seem that fantastic (I was coming from California at the time).

BUT, once you live here, you get it. The lack of humidity makes everything better. Back in Ontario, summer days would often be "80 degrees, 105 degrees with the humidex", and the only way to avoid the heat and sweating would be to go inside and find AC (or go swimming). There's no such thing as "humidex" here: even on the hottest days, finding some shade and a slight breeze will drop your temperature drastically. The hottest part of the day is the afternoon, and again due to the lack of humidity the morning/evening temperatures drop quite a bit, so what might be uncomfortable in the afternoon can be very pleasant in the morning or evening. While our AC would be blasting 24/7 in Ontario, we rarely turned ours on last summer in CO, usually relying on fans + moving to cooler parts of the house.

How often does the weather prevent me from getting outside? Almost never, and I'm definitely not the "do it despite the weather" kind of guy. Even on the 100+ degree days last year I could still go mountain biking if I hit the trails in the morning. Since the start of March I've probably been outside 45 days between biking, hiking, and climbing. The summer brings some afternoon thunderstorms, but they usually don't stick around too long and you can still be outside before/after one comes. I biked to work almost every day last summer and probably only got caught in a light rain maybe half a dozen times.

Oh yeah, and don't forget about the elevation: when it might be super hot in town at 5000ft, a hike up in RMNP above 10,000ft could easily be 20 degrees cooler.

One other personal thing I've noticed improve by living in a dry climate is that I can be closer to my wife, too. When there's humidity and you're all sweaty and sticky, human, skin-to-skin contact is the last thing you want. When the humidity and sweat drop, the lovin goes up.


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By Ian70
Apr 25, 2012

J Miles wrote:
Can anyone who has spent a large amount of time in both areas let me know how the two compare? Also, what % of the time do you find yourself staying inside because of the weather due to rain, sleet, heat, humidity...? A good follow up to this question is how tolerant are you to these adverse conditions (if you don't mind the rain or heat then you will obviously be outside more than those who do)?


I grew up in Denver and then lived way upstate in NY for a few years (near the Thousand Islands region).

As I recall, upstate NY probably got just about the same amount of snow as Denver, but... once it fell in NY it stuck around and compounded. Whereas in Denver, the snow melted after a few days and the sun was back out. Overall winters seemed longer and a bit greyer in NY -- due to climate and higher latitude; so Colorado seemed quite a bit sunnier to me, even in winter.

Agree with the Ian above (he must be cool if his name is Ian), Denver is drier, humidity-wise, so I also think this makes it seem not as cold or hot as places with higher humidity. But regardless, Denver does get much hotter in the summer than NY.

Finally, it seems to rain more in NY (guess that figures from all the lakes and rivers in NY, and the droughts in CO).

For context, I get out and about in all temps and locations, just switching sports based on geography and weather conditions.

Hope this helps, good luck!


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By Tom R
From Denver, CO
Apr 25, 2012
self portrait

J Miles wrote:
After reading through all of these awesome posts and comparing CO to upstate NY the weather seems to be the most important difference for me. Looking at weather data from sites like city-data.com the weather doesn't look that different, but I have a feeling that I'm either missing something when looking at the data, or the two are actually closer that I think. The biggest differences that I see is that CO is less humid and has more sunny days (temps seem comparable). Can anyone who has spent a large amount of time in both areas let me know how the two compare? Also, what % of the time do you find yourself staying inside because of the weather due to rain, sleet, heat, humidity...? A good follow up to this question is how tolerant are you to these adverse conditions (if you don't mind the rain or heat then you will obviously be outside more than those who do)? Thanks again everyone!

Humidity makes it feel alot hotter or colder.
45 degrees and sunny=climbing outside in a tee shirt.
45 degrees and cloudy=climbing in the gym (unless you have a high tolerance for cold, I don't)
I get out about 150 days a year and climb almost every weekend in the winter (many of those weekends in a tee shirt). In Delaware, where I grew up, that would be unheard of.


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By handon broward
From Rochester, NY / Aspen, CO
Apr 25, 2012
Elk Range, CO

Ian Stewart wrote:
When there's humidity and you're all sweaty and sticky, human, skin-to-skin contact is the last thing you want. When the humidity and sweat drop, the lovin goes up.


+1
Easily the most important point yet.


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By Joe Huggins
From 666 Rue le Jour-Edge City
Apr 25, 2012
mmmm....tree

David Sahalie wrote:
colorado is great for east coast transplants. new mexico sucks.

When you guys get an economy, it'll be paradise. Oh,wait; forget I wrote that.


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By ErikaNW
Apr 25, 2012
Rapping off the Matron October, 2010

J Miles wrote:
Also, what % of the time do you find yourself staying inside because of the weather due to rain, sleet, heat, humidity...?


Honestly, sometimes I find myself wishing for a rainy day so that I'm motivated to stay inside and get some work done! My body gives up way before the weather does these days!

I grew up in Colorado and after a 9 year stretch in Illinois and Ontario was able to come back for good 3 years ago. I was shocked in the Midwest to discover combined heat/humidity could make exercise dangerous in the summer (one heat stroke helped me figure that out) and that 40 degrees with 80% humidity makes being outside pretty unpleasant too. I also felt claustrophobic all the time with the absence of long views/vistas - it was very disorienting for me for the first couple of years.

The climate here is as perfect as you will ever find. Too hot? Go up in elevation. Too cold? Put on a fleece. I never owned a true, heavy winter coat until my first Illinois winter. It just never gets that bitterly cold here - as you will get very tired of hearing... 'It's a dry cold.'

Salaries in my profession are about 20% lower here, but the lifestyle is worth it. Things I miss - easy gardening and large bodies of flat water for sculling. Those are pretty easy to live without given all of the other options.

Good luck!




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By Dave Cummings
From Grand Junction, CO
Apr 26, 2012
me on my redpoint

Hank Caylor wrote:
I dumped a stripper in Austin and they don't like that too much, so I moved to Boulder and just never left.


Awesome


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By djkyote
Apr 26, 2012

Joe Huggins wrote:
When you guys get an economy, it'll be paradise. Oh,wait; forget I wrote that.


yep, new mexico sucks, don't move here. wyoming sucks too.


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By Mike Wysuph
From Broomfield, CO
Apr 26, 2012

Found a campsite last summer where you could boulder, sport climb, trad climb, hike, mountain bike, road bike, paddle whatever you wanted, swim, fly fish......all within walking distance from our pop-up.

err, what a sec, what am I doing...Colorado sux!! The lack of moisture in the air makes my hair frizzy.


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By J Miles
From Queensbury, NY
Apr 26, 2012
Flatirons

Mike Wysuph wrote:
The lack of moisture in the air makes my hair frizzy.


This is something else that I was worried about :-).

Almost completely off topic...do most of you rent, own a house, or own a town home? How do you like your current living conditions?


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By Michael Schneiter
From Glenwood Springs, CO
Apr 26, 2012
Goofin' on the Grand after soloing the Upper Exum with my wife.

It's different for everyone, based on priorities and such, but I love Colorado and specifically, where I live in CO (Glenwood Springs) because of what I get to do on a daily basis. For example, Tuesday I finished work, picked up my wife from home and within minutes of our place we were mountain biking single track. Then, minutes away again, we climbed half a dozen sport pitches before finishing the day at the Brewpub for dinner.


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