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By mattnorville
Nov 30, 2011
Ship's Prow.

I hate when dogs get near my pack, I usually kick em if they start snooping inside the sack


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By Blake Cash
Nov 30, 2011

Notice how all of the haters are from the land of asinine dog rules...

Dogs do not limit your climbing, and they DON'T belong at home...that's just stupid. Why even get a dog? Hell, let's just euthanize all dogs...they can't go outside (but we can?) and they shouldn't be left inside all day either.

I didn't get a dog to leave him at home. It's been a learning curve, for sure...but he doesn't hinder me in doing anything I do. Granted I do mostly single-pitch sport...but we bought him a rescue harness, I rap with him into areas that are a top-down approach, jug out fixed lines with him. Take him to the NRG all the time...he's cool with being carried down ladders. Loves to play, boundless energy...which is a GOOD thing. He guards my shit from other dogs...but as soon as that dog is away from my stuff, he will just want to play. We trail run 3-4 days a week, he's been on 10 milers with me. He has the best life I could imagine for a dog.

He's an Aussie/Husky mix


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By Geir
From Tucson, AZ
Nov 30, 2011
Toofast

Beautiful dog!


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By APBT1976
Nov 30, 2011
Black Dike 12/25/11

Blake Cash wrote:
Notice how all of the haters are from the land of asinine dog rules... Dogs do not limit your climbing, and they DON'T belong at home...that's just stupid. Why even get a dog? Hell, let's just euthanize all dogs...they can't go outside (but we can?) and they shouldn't be left inside all day either. I didn't get a dog to leave him at home. It's been a learning curve, for sure...but he doesn't hinder me in doing anything I do. Granted I do mostly single-pitch sport...but we bought him a rescue harness, I rap with him into areas that are a top-down approach, jug out fixed lines with him. Take him to the NRG all the time...he's cool with being carried down ladders. Loves to play, boundless energy...which is a GOOD thing. He guards my shit from other dogs...but as soon as that dog is away from my stuff, he will just want to play. We trail run 3-4 days a week, he's been on 10 milers with me. He has the best life I could imagine for a dog. He's an Aussie/Husky mix


I have two dogs that did the same thing leashed. Wait till he gets injured, lyme a bad hip or shoulder or old then that dog you trained to go everywhere do everything is gonna be fucking miserable!!

I mean really good for you as i love a happy dog as much as the next. It was my girls three year birthday Monday and she got her own cake and ice cream candle and all. They eat home made organic food from Whole Foods and mostly if they cant go somewhere i cant go then. However climbing or just hiking with a loose dog is a real pain in the ass for sooooo many people that the guy that insists on having his dog off leash will just NEVER understand.

Nice looking dog and for real i am glad he is loved but for real for many reason it is not fair to other people including other dog owners that dont want your dog running up in or nosing around thier dog.


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By Blake Cash
Nov 30, 2011

APBT1976 wrote:
I have two dogs that did the same thing leashed. Wait till he gets injured, lyme a bad hip or shoulder or old then that dog you trained to go everywhere do everything is gonna be fucking miserable!! I mean really good for you as i love a happy dog as much as the next. It was my girls three year birthday Monday and she got her own cake and ice cream candle and all. They eat home made organic food from Whole Foods and mostly if they cant go somewhere i cant go then. However climbing or just hiking with a loose dog is a real pain in the ass for sooooo many people that the guy that insists on having his dog off leash will just NEVER understand. Nice looking dog and for real i am glad he is loved but for real for many reason it is not fair to other people including other dog owners that dont want your dog running up in or nosing around thier dog.


So...what you're saying is that no one should take their dog anywhere because that dog "might" one day not be able to be as active? That's the most ridiculous line of reasoning I've ever heard. Ever heard of quality of life? And where did I say my dog noses around peoples' things?


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By Jake Jones
From Richmond, VA
Nov 30, 2011
Me and the offspring walking back to the car after a day of cragging.

Blake Cash wrote:
Notice how all of the haters are from the land of asinine dog rules... Dogs do not limit your climbing, and they DON'T belong at home...that's just stupid. Why even get a dog? Hell, let's just euthanize all dogs...they can't go outside (but we can?) and they shouldn't be left inside all day either. I didn't get a dog to leave him at home. It's been a learning curve, for sure...but he doesn't hinder me in doing anything I do. Granted I do mostly single-pitch sport...but we bought him a rescue harness, I rap with him into areas that are a top-down approach, jug out fixed lines with him. Take him to the NRG all the time...he's cool with being carried down ladders. Loves to play, boundless energy...which is a GOOD thing. He guards my shit from other dogs...but as soon as that dog is away from my stuff, he will just want to play. We trail run 3-4 days a week, he's been on 10 milers with me. He has the best life I could imagine for a dog. He's an Aussie/Husky mix


It's good to see that you're as good to your pet as he/she is to you. You go the extra mile with rapping/ascending with your harnessed dog. I don't do that. However, I do take my dogs whenever I can, and that's a lot. Not just climbing- bike riding, hiking, general camping, and every time I get in the car, at least one of them is with me.

You kind of paint the picture of black or white. I.e. if you don't take your dog cragging everywhere but multi-pitch, then it's locked up in a cruel and lonely prison created by a heartless master. I think more often than not, this is not the case. Are there people that do that? I'm certain. I'm also certain that I'm not one of them. When I do leave one or both of them home, it's usually at someone else's house that has dogs and they probably have a more fun weekend hanging out with other dogs than sitting next to a pack and some gear alone.

Just my opinion. Thanks for yours.


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By TheBirdman
From Eldorado Springs, Colorado
Nov 30, 2011

The problem with dogs is that people view their own dog, like their own kid. Everyone thinks their dog is the best in the world and s/he may truly be Lassie. It may be obedient, sweet, gentle, quiet, etc. As a result, dog owners tend to flout the rules in regards to their own dog.

"Well, my dog is really well-behaved so he doesn't need to be on a leash." "He's just barking because he worries about me when I climb." "My dog is super friendly with other dogs so I just let him do his thing." All of these, I have heard said by a dog owner at one point or another at the crag.

With regards to the first statement, I don't care if you own Rin Tin Tin; not everyone loves your dog and wants it in their business, no matter how great they might be. I have a dog, I love dogs, and personally, I don't mind having a dog roaming around one bit. However, if I had been bitten by one when I was younger and was looking for a nice peaceful day climbing, I wouldn't be happy about your unsupervised dog.

Secondly, if your dog barks AT ALL, whether it be a friendly bark or a threatening one, leave it at home. Dogs don't get more leeway than humans and if a human decided to constantly yell unintelligible noises all day, you'd probably tell them to shut it. Same applies to dogs.

As for the last statement, your dog might be the friendliest dog ever. Mine is not. If my dog is tied to a tree near the base of the climb I'm on and your unsupervised, unleashed dog approaches and gets it's face ripped off, I'm not going to apologize. Besides that, unleashed dogs get in the way, step on ropes, and generally just add an unnecessary layer of complexity to the cragging situation.

I don't mean any of this to imply that getting a dog is bad. I think getting a dog is one of the greatest things I have ever done. That said, you need to learn respect for others as well as how to deal with a dog. I bring the dog to the crag only because he is absolutely silent and I tie him right next to our stuff. No sandwich stealing, rope trampling, barking, or getting in the way is allowed. Climbing is human time, not dog time. Only if the crag is empty or if I ask other nearby climbers if they mind will I take the dog off the leash.

As for the dude making the argument that dogs have just as much of a right to be at the crag as humans, I respectfully disagree. Dogs are allowed outside, 100%. However, there is a dog time and human time. Nobody will mind if you bring your dog to the dog park, a hiking trail, etc. because these are dog activities. Climbing is not; it is for humans only. Besides, as someone else pointed out, a dog has no fun being tied to a tree next to your stuff all day at the bottom of some multipitch climb. If you're climbing anywhere where others might be climbing, leave the dog at home, with someone else, or, and I know this last one is a crazy though, wake up an hour earlier and take the dog for a walk before you leave for the day...

I love dogs, just not at the crag. Other climbers deserve respectful treatment more than your dog needs the opportunity to be outside for a little while. And your dog is not special, I'm sorry. We all think our own dog is great, but everyone else looks at is like just another dog so follow the rules because they do in fact, apply to you.


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By camhead
From Vandalia, Appalachia
Nov 30, 2011
You stay away from mah pig!

Blake Cash wrote:
Notice how all of the haters are from the land of asinine dog rules... Dogs do not limit your climbing, and they DON'T belong at home...that's just stupid. Why even get a dog? Hell, let's just euthanize all dogs...they can't go outside (but we can?) and they shouldn't be left inside all day either. I didn't get a dog to leave him at home. It's been a learning curve, for sure...but he doesn't hinder me in doing anything I do. Granted I do mostly single-pitch sport...but we bought him a rescue harness, I rap with him into areas that are a top-down approach, jug out fixed lines with him. Take him to the NRG all the time...he's cool with being carried down ladders. Loves to play, boundless energy...which is a GOOD thing. He guards my shit from other dogs...but as soon as that dog is away from my stuff, he will just want to play. We trail run 3-4 days a week, he's been on 10 milers with me. He has the best life I could imagine for a dog. He's an Aussie/Husky mix


Aww... Hank is awesome. I'm still not sure if he's forgiven me for knocking him off that rock at the Lode, though.


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By APBT1976
Nov 30, 2011
Black Dike 12/25/11

The problem with dogs is that people view their own dog, like their own kid. Everyone thinks their dog is the best in the world and s/he may truly be Lassie. It may be obedient, sweet, gentle, quiet, etc. As a result, dog owners tend to flout the rules in regards to their own dog. "Well, my dog is really well-behaved so he doesn't need to be on a leash." "He's just barking because he worries about me when I climb." "My dog is super friendly with other dogs so I just let him do his thing." All of these, I have heard said by a dog owner at one point or another at the crag. With regards to the first statement, I don't care if you own Rin Tin Tin; not everyone loves your dog and wants it in their business, no matter how great they might be. I have a dog, I love dogs, and personally, I don't mind having a dog roaming around one bit. However, if I had been bitten by one when I was younger and was looking for a nice peaceful day climbing, I wouldn't be happy about your unsupervised dog. Secondly, if your dog barks AT ALL, whether it be a friendly bark or a threatening one, leave it at home. Dogs don't get more leeway than humans and if a human decided to constantly yell
unintelligible noises all day, you'd probably tell them to shut it. Same applies to dogs. As for the last statement, your dog might be the friendliest dog ever. Mine is not. If my dog is tied to a tree near the base of the climb I'm on and your unsupervised, unleashed dog approaches and gets it's face ripped off, I'm not going to apologize. Besides that, unleashed dogs get in the way, step on ropes, and generally just add an unnecessary layer of complexity to the cragging situation. I don't mean any of this to imply that getting a dog is bad. I think getting a dog is one of the greatest things I have ever done. That said, you need to learn respect for others as well as how to deal with a dog. I bring the dog to the crag only because he is absolutely silent and I tie him right next to our stuff. No sandwich stealing, rope trampling, barking, or getting in the way is allowed. Climbing is human time, not dog time. Only if the crag is empty or if I ask other nearby climbers if they mind will I take the dog off the leash. As for the dude making the argument that dogs have just as much of a right to be at the crag as humans, I respectfully disagree. Dogs are allowed outside, 100%. However, there is a dog time and human time. Nobody will mind if you bring your dog to the dog park, a hiking trail, etc. because these are dog activities. Climbing is not; it is for humans only. Besides, as someone else pointed out, a dog has no fun being tied to a tree next to your stuff all day at the bottom of some multipitch climb. If you're climbing anywhere where others might be climbing, leave the dog at home, with someone else, or, and I know this last one is a crazy though, wake up an hour earlier and take the dog for a walk before you leave for the day... I love dogs, just not at the crag. Other climbers deserve respectful treatment more than your dog needs the opportunity to be outside for a little while. And your dog is not special, I'm sorry. We all think our own dog is great, but everyone else looks at is like just another dog so follow the rules because they do in fact, apply to you.

You said exactly what i was also trying to say just in a way more effective manner.

Dog owners always hold their dog in a light only the dog owner can.

Not all people like dogs and that is coming from a guy that has a 100lb dog and 70lb dog hogging the whole bed twisting my ass into a pretzel.

I also spent my day going on our monthly day long outa state trip to specialty vet for my dog with terrible allergies. That cost $600 a month. His food is hand made and take one full day a week to make and cost an additional $400 a month.

So don't try saying i dont like dogs or feel they deserve the best of lives. I also hand walk them at least 5 miles a day and average more like 35-40 miles a week just walking them.

The dink that take over the local ball field where children play in feces and it reeks so bad come spring from all the frozen piss and shit left behind all winter from off leash dogs where it is clearly marked dogs must be leash and picked up after in a town with a leash law.... "YES REALLY PISSES ME OFF".

So don't off leash dogs on hiking trails as they "even the most friendly well behaved ones cause problems for other people. Like i said i walk/hike my dogs 35 miles a week and have for 4 year straight now and i would say on average 5-10 times a day i see a dog creat a problem for someone other than its owner because it was not on a leash!

If you don't like rules don't take on responsibilities that make you have more rules.


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By Price
From SLC, UT
Nov 30, 2011

NO :(


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By England
From ?
Nov 30, 2011
Alpine toothpick.

TheBirdman wrote:
The problem with dogs is that people view their own dog, like their own kid. Everyone thinks their dog is the best in the world and s/he may truly be Lassie. It may be obedient, sweet, gentle, quiet, etc. As a result, dog owners tend to flout the rules in regards to their own dog. "Well, my dog is really well-behaved so he doesn't need to be on a leash." "He's just barking because he worries about me when I climb." "My dog is super friendly with other dogs so I just let him do his thing." All of these, I have heard said by a dog owner at one point or another at the crag. With regards to the first statement, I don't care if you own Rin Tin Tin; not everyone loves your dog and wants it in their business, no matter how great they might be. I have a dog, I love dogs, and personally, I don't mind having a dog roaming around one bit. However, if I had been bitten by one when I was younger and was looking for a nice peaceful day climbing, I wouldn't be happy about your unsupervised dog. Secondly, if your dog barks AT ALL, whether it be a friendly bark or a threatening one, leave it at home. Dogs don't get more leeway than humans and if a human decided to constantly yell unintelligible noises all day, you'd probably tell them to shut it. Same applies to dogs. As for the last statement, your dog might be the friendliest dog ever. Mine is not. If my dog is tied to a tree near the base of the climb I'm on and your unsupervised, unleashed dog approaches and gets it's face ripped off, I'm not going to apologize. Besides that, unleashed dogs get in the way, step on ropes, and generally just add an unnecessary layer of complexity to the cragging situation. I don't mean any of this to imply that getting a dog is bad. I think getting a dog is one of the greatest things I have ever done. That said, you need to learn respect for others as well as how to deal with a dog. I bring the dog to the crag only because he is absolutely silent and I tie him right next to our stuff. No sandwich stealing, rope trampling, barking, or getting in the way is allowed. Climbing is human time, not dog time. Only if the crag is empty or if I ask other nearby climbers if they mind will I take the dog off the leash. As for the dude making the argument that dogs have just as much of a right to be at the crag as humans, I respectfully disagree. Dogs are allowed outside, 100%. However, there is a dog time and human time. Nobody will mind if you bring your dog to the dog park, a hiking trail, etc. because these are dog activities. Climbing is not; it is for humans only. Besides, as someone else pointed out, a dog has no fun being tied to a tree next to your stuff all day at the bottom of some multipitch climb. If you're climbing anywhere where others might be climbing, leave the dog at home, with someone else, or, and I know this last one is a crazy though, wake up an hour earlier and take the dog for a walk before you leave for the day... I love dogs, just not at the crag. Other climbers deserve respectful treatment more than your dog needs the opportunity to be outside for a little while. And your dog is not special, I'm sorry. We all think our own dog is great, but everyone else looks at is like just another dog so follow the rules because they do in fact, apply to you.

This person has nailed it. The BEST post concerning dogs!!! Thanks for that. I do not own a dog and never will. Growing up in WV, I was bitten multiple times by massive dogs just riding my bike. Climbing at Shelf, and Turkey my son has been bitten twice(playing under a tree with his toys not minding the dog at all), and my childrens lunch has been stolen out of their packs. My ropes have been pissed on in three seperate occasions. I dont blame the dogs, but I do blame the owners. Its always the same type of people, me me me.


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By Kenny Thompson
From woodfords, california
Nov 30, 2011
gorge

If your worried about dogs at the crag you should stay at the gym. I would take a dog over your fucking cell phones and yammering anyday


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By APBT1976
Nov 30, 2011
Black Dike 12/25/11

Kenny Thompson wrote:
If your worried about dogs at the crag you should stay at the gym. I would take a dog over your fucking cell phones and yammering anyday


Id take your dog at the crag any day over you also ;)

It not the dogs fault it has become everyone's problem but it's stupid owner. Dogs are a direct reflection of the owner just like a kid running the isle of a restaurant. Even if you dog is the most well behaved mild mannered obedient dog in the world it should be on a dam leash unless you are on private fucking fenced property. Don't impose your choices on me. Shit you can't smoke on the streets of NYC not that i agree? I do however agree a dog and both my dogs and any dog i ever own belong on a dam leash at all times when not on private property!!

Yes it pisses me off as others unleashed dogs run up on me and my leashed dogs at least ten times a day. Beyond that i read others "children, adults, elderly" body language that do and do not own dogs dealing with your unleashed dog at least another 20 times a day and it is clear a large percentage also do not appreciate your dog!! Yes some do appreciate your dog but should they not have the choice. Especially a child and the elderly or the guy that was bitten.

Beyond all that i also speak with many dog owners on my side of the leashed dog argument fence weekly that also agree your unleashed dog belongs on a dam leash. Your dog ruins it for us all just like anything else in life one bad seed or dumb owner!!

Really though any of us that feel this way are just talking to our self as those that don't agree with us are the type of person that can not be spoken to objectively about anything nor can they see or admit when they do something wrong in most cases. My shit don't stink but i can smell that guy from across the street kinda tude. That guy needs to check himself lol ;)

Fucking dog owners i am most of the time ashamed to be one as as a dog owner you are grouped together with all the other retard dog owners. I had a guy just last week stop me and my 55 year old mother and two leashed dogs like 4 miles down a very secluded country road that many like to walk there dogs leashed but mostly "unleashed" and grill us that we needed to start picking up our dogs shit. I reached in my side jacket pocket and pulled out three bags full of dog shit as we had walked like 6 miles at that point. I then reached in my back pocket and pulled out a fist full of empty dog bags. I really cant blame people like this guy as this road is connected to Wellesely Collage where many like to again walk their dogs mostly "unleashed" as it has a pond and trails. I walk my dogs on this campus 3-4 days a week, week in and week out. I have always noticed the odd dog shit bag full just left or wung off to the side of the trail or into the woods. This spring summer and fall i started noticing the full shit bags pile up left in random places all around the pond and the campus. Week after week these bags continued to pile and pile and pile up and still remain to this day. That does not take into account that the trails are often littered with dog shit. Once it snows it is like a fucking mine field and stinks to high hell. People play with their children at these places or at least they would like to!!!

Imagine that, they wanna play with their children the same place you let your dog shit and piss but cant as you decided so for them ;) !!

Get a grip average dog owner/lover you suck!!!!


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By mountainmaiden
From durango
Dec 1, 2011
me

One that sleeps at the crag and serves as a spotter:)
One that sleeps at the crag and serves as a spotter:)


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By JPVallone
Dec 1, 2011

I love dogs, but I think the best crag dog is the one that stays at home while you go play on the rocks.

If you think tying your dog up while you climb, but still supervised is ok, well I guess that is better then leash less, but dogs don't know what it means when someone yells rock or drops something.


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By Blake Cash
Dec 1, 2011

JPVallone wrote:
I love dogs, but I think the best crag dog is the one that stays at home while you go play on the rocks. If you think tying your dog up while you climb, but still supervised is ok, well I guess that is better then leash less, but dogs don't know what it means when someone yells rock or drops something.


Actually...they do, it's not hard to train that into a dog. You can yell, "rock" and Hank runs directly under the cliff, as close to the wall as possible. If you yell "rope", he sprints as far away from the rope being pulled as he can. They aren't idiots.

And I think for the author of this thread...you should not get a dog because you want to take it to the crag...but because you want to love a dog. I got my dog because first I just wanted to companionship, but now, he's literally my best friend, hell, he's lying right beside me as I write this...and we're about to go climbing. Get the dog you want, train it to the best of your ability. Love it and figure out the climbing shit when the time comes. There is no "good crag dog"...only responsible, smart dog owners...your dog will follow your lead.


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By Geir
From Tucson, AZ
Dec 1, 2011
Toofast

Blake Cash wrote:
Actually...they do, it's not hard to train that into a dog. You can yell, "rock" and Hank runs directly under the cliff, as close to the wall as possible. If you yell "rope", he sprints as far away from the rope being pulled as he can. They aren't idiots. And I think for the author of this thread...you should not get a dog because you want to take it to the crag...but because you want to love a dog. I got my dog because first I just wanted to companionship, but now, he's literally my best friend, hell, he's lying right beside me as I write this...and we're about to go climbing. Get the dog you want, train it to the best of your ability. Love it and figure out the climbing shit when the time comes. There is no "good crag dog"...only responsible, smart dog owners...your dog will follow your lead.


Agreed.


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By Old and Busted
From Centennial, CO
Dec 1, 2011
Stabby

As climber's, I think we all have a penchant for somewhat masochistic venture's. At the least we seem to enjoy exotic challenges most normal people would avoid.

In that spirit, I vote for Basenji's. Having one keeps you on your toes, to radically understate the experience.

www.coloradobasenjirescue.org/adoptable.shtml


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By BDergay
From Eldorado
Dec 1, 2011
Jayy-Dogg on rappel

Screw the haters. Get a dog.

Just train it well. And like Blake said above, yes you can train them to avoid rock-fall, and likewise for not walking on the rope.

Obviously, if you're doing multi-pitch, monster-mutt is best left at home; but who (lame-ass, bitter haters aside) has issues with dogs while cragging?

I'd rather deal with mutts that are PSYCHED to be hanging with the group, than complaining haters, any day.

One word of advice- think smaller dog (~25 lbs). Less food, less crap and you can pick them up to assist when mountaineering, scrambling etc--


Monster after joining us on the Mirror Wall
Monster after joining us on the Mirror Wall


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By covelocos
Dec 1, 2011
Digs deep!

The best climbing dog is the one that stays home.


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By Boodge Nomchompski
Dec 1, 2011
Ancient wall art

Blake Cash wrote:
Notice how all of the haters are from the land of asinine dog rules... Dogs do not limit your climbing, and they DON'T belong at home...that's just stupid. Why even get a dog? Hell, let's just euthanize all dogs...they can't go outside (but we can?) and they shouldn't be left inside all day either. I didn't get a dog to leave him at home. It's been a learning curve, for sure...but he doesn't hinder me in doing anything I do. Granted I do mostly single-pitch sport...but we bought him a rescue harness, I rap with him into areas that are a top-down approach, jug out fixed lines with him. Take him to the NRG all the time...he's cool with being carried down ladders. Loves to play, boundless energy...which is a GOOD thing. He guards my shit from other dogs...but as soon as that dog is away from my stuff, he will just want to play. We trail run 3-4 days a week, he's been on 10 milers with me. He has the best life I could imagine for a dog. He's an Aussie/Husky mix


I thought I had the only Aussie/Husky mix! Yours is beautiful also.

Boudreaux
Boudreaux


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By Carl Sherven
Dec 1, 2011

Has already been said, but the best dog is one that's well trained. It's way more about training/socializing/owner than it is the dog. When the time comes please be honest with yourself as to whether the dog is ready to go to the crag with you and not be a nuisance to everyone. When you're there, make sure to monitor its behavior and correct behavior that is inappropriate. I love dogs, but I've had a lot of bad experiences with them at the crag, the worst being a dog snarling at me while I was walking past it on a trail; the owner was nowhere to be seen. I pulled my knife out and I would've ended that thing if it had actually charged at me. I'm not saying that to be an ITG; I'm saying that because I wish more dog owners would take training seriously and realize that some people do not tolerate an animal threatening them. I still have scars from being attacked by two German shepherds when I was 8, and it would have been much worse if two neighborhood adults hadn't been outside and came running to help me. I don't take chances with a vicious animal of any kind/size, nobody should. If you love your dog, train it well and you'll both be happier for it.


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By Jake Jones
From Richmond, VA
Dec 1, 2011
Me and the offspring walking back to the car after a day of cragging.

Boodge Nomchompski wrote:
I thought I had the only Aussie/Husky mix! Yours is beautiful also.



Awesome looking dog!


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By Red
From Arizona
Dec 1, 2011
Cobra Kai

Blake Cash is spot on.

Those saying that dogs shouldn't be at the crag sound like a bunch of elitist that think they own every crag in the world. Get of your high horses. Dog owners have just as much of a right to enjoy their time out at the crag with their best friend as anyone else has the right to be there.(as long as dogs are allowed where you are going, obviously)

With that being said; Dog owner need to be responsible for their animal and properly train it! Owners need to train their dogs to respect others space and property. It is not cool for dogs to be running over ropes and getting into others belongings. That will bother even the biggest dog lover. Just keep consistent with training your dogs crag etiquette.


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By Red
From Arizona
Dec 1, 2011
Cobra Kai

Kati T. wrote:
My husband and I want to get a dog to bring along on our adventurous trips to the crag --

Any luck finding a good companion yet?


FLAG


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