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Whats on your harness?
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By Jay Knower
Administrator
From Plymouth, NH
Jan 14, 2011
Technosurfing, Rumney. Photo by Seth Hamel.

"They carried the common secret of cowardice barely restrained, the instinct to run or freeze or hide, and in many respects this was the heaviest burden of all, for it could never be put down, it required perfect balance and perfect posture." --Tim O'Brien, "The Things They Carried"


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By Crossing
From Breinigsville, PA
Jan 14, 2011
old rag summit

Anchor gear consists of 2 lockers a cordelette on a locking biner and 2 48" slings over my shoulder.

The number of slings I bring depends on the route I'm climbing, but when setting out on a multipich route I've never done before its usually 10 slings tripled with biners.

I have an "Oh Shit" locking biner that I may or may not bring with that has webbing and a knife.

For bailing a long route at a minimum you should bring a knife, your cordelette can be cut up to be used as bail gear, or if your desperate use a sling, a locker can be sacrificed too. If your climbing at a place like the Gunks, where you continually use tat rap stations webbing is a good thing to bring with you. Bringing another rap device is redundant, use a munter hitch and keep a BD Rocklock as your "Oh Shit" biner. Slings can be used as prussics. A PAS or similar is extra bulk, tie in with the rope.

Bottom line is that all you really need is to bring an adequate amount of water, the correct clothing and a knife. Utilizing the gear you have on your rack can get you out of almost anything, its about having the knowledge to use what you have with you, not fuel your gear lust with specialized gear.


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By Jay Eggleston
From Littleton
Jan 14, 2011
Berlin

Crossing wrote:
Bottom line is that all you really need is to bring an adequate amount of water, the correct clothing and a knife. Utilizing the gear you have on your rack can get you out of almost anything, its about having the knowledge to use what you have with you, not fuel your gear lust with specialized gear.


I agree for the most part but I never carry water unless it is really hot, in the alpine, or over 5 pitches. I bring rappell slings if the route calls for it (a descent without bolt anchors)but I don't carry them at all times. I don't use a cordellete either unless leads are not being swapped. Its all about taking only what you really need and this varies by climb.


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By Ed Wright
Jan 14, 2011
Magic Ed

Since I mostly climb multi-pitch bolted routes I always carry a tiny crescent wrench for tightening loose bolts, a tiny vial with my emergency heart medication and a PAS to clip in with along with the rope. (All you PAS haters can suck my choda).


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By Ryan Williams
Administrator
From London (sort of)
Jan 14, 2011
El Chorro

I always have:

- My rack
- Appropriate number 24" runners, all tripled w/ two biners
- Autoblock w/ two lockers
- One Petzl William and one super light locker
- Bail locker w/ webbing, quicklink, prusiks, tiny knife from the AAC
- 24" and 48" nylon slings over my shoulder

Sometimes I also have:

- Cordelette, I think mine is 7mm?
- Extra lightweight locker or two

Lately I've been leaving the Cordelette behind in favor of using the rope. I always use the rope to stay safe on the anchor.

On longer routes we take:

10L pack for the second. Inside are rain shells, bars, tiny headlamps, lighter and a few cigs, two liters of water and one liter of red wine or a pint of whiskey.


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By Andrew Hildner
Jan 14, 2011

There's a lot of comments about just being able to use the gear on your rack. There's also a lot of truth about that, too, and you should know how to improvise (bachman's, klemheist, munter, garda, etc). However, I've seen it several times where the belayer is hosed when their partner (with the whole rack) gets injured or separated from them (like on rappel)--leaving the belayer without enough gear to escape the belay or self-rescue.

For that reason, I always carry two short prussik loops (6mm cord) and a dyneema double-length sling on a pear locker that I also use to hold my chalk bag. That's, what, 6 extra ounces in a small, out of the way package. That's enough to escape a belay with a load-releasing hitch or to jug up a rope if a rappel doesn't reach the ground or next anchor; even if I don't have the rack.

Most importantly KNOW HOW TO USE THE GEAR YOU DO HAVE. Have you practiced escaping a weighted belay, or transferring from rappel to ascending a rope? Just as importantly, do your partners know these skills?

Gear doesn't help if you don't have both the knowledge and practice of how to get out of bad situations.


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By Jeff J
From Bozeman
Jan 14, 2011

WilliamJ wrote:
We all know about the rack but what else do you bring up with you on multi pitch routes? cordelettes, webbing, extra slings, spare binners for anchors, prusiks, bail gear? Whats your method of getting it all on your harness?


For me, all my active pro goes on my shoulder sling for smallest to largest, usually im leading and that the way I like to rack it.

On my harness.
one set of stoppers divided in to 1/3 s, m, l each on it own biner.
6 quick draws
25ish feet of cordolet.
master point/belay biner and belay device.
chalk bag with rain shell
nut tool
10 or so extendable draws

my second carries the rest of the crap


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By Andrew Hildner
Jan 14, 2011

There's a lot of comments about just being able to use the gear on your rack. There's also a lot of truth about that, too, and you should know how to improvise (bachman's, klemheist, munter, garda, etc). However, I've seen it several times where the belayer is hosed when their partner (with the whole rack) gets injured or separated from them (like on rappel)--leaving the belayer without enough gear to escape the belay or self-rescue.

For that reason, I always carry two short prussik loops (6mm cord) and a dyneema double-length sling on a pear locker that I also use to hold my chalk bag. That's, what, 6 extra ounces in a small, out of the way package. That's enough to escape a belay with a load-releasing hitch or to jug up a rope if a rappel doesn't reach the ground or next anchor; even if I don't have the rack.

Most importantly KNOW HOW TO USE THE GEAR YOU DO HAVE. Have you practiced escaping a weighted belay, or transferring from rappel to ascending a rope? Just as importantly, do your partners know these skills?

Gear doesn't help if you don't have both the knowledge and practice of how to get out of bad situations.


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By Andrew Hildner
Jan 14, 2011

There's a lot of comments about just being able to use the gear on your rack. There's also a lot of truth about that, too, and you should know how to improvise (bachman's, klemheist, munter, garda, etc). However, I've seen it several times where the belayer is hosed when their partner (with the whole rack) gets injured or separated from them (like on rappel)--leaving the belayer without enough gear to escape the belay or self-rescue.

For that reason, I always carry two short prussik loops (6mm cord) and a dyneema double-length sling on a pear locker that I also use to hold my chalk bag. That's, what, 6 extra ounces in a small, out of the way package. That's enough to escape a belay with a load-releasing hitch or to jug up a rope if a rappel doesn't reach the ground or next anchor; even if I don't have the rack.

Most importantly KNOW HOW TO USE THE GEAR YOU DO HAVE. Have you practiced escaping a weighted belay, or transferring from rappel to ascending a rope? Just as importantly, do your partners know these skills?

Gear doesn't help if you don't have both the knowledge and practice of how to get out of bad situations.


FLAG
By Andrew Hildner
Jan 14, 2011

There's a lot of comments about just being able to use the gear on your rack. There's also a lot of truth about that, too, and you should know how to improvise (bachman's, klemheist, munter, garda, etc). However, I've seen it several times where the belayer is hosed when their partner (with the whole rack) gets injured or separated from them (like on rappel)--leaving the belayer without enough gear to escape the belay or self-rescue.

For that reason, I always carry two short prussik loops (6mm cord) and a dyneema double-length sling on a pear locker that I also use to hold my chalk bag. That's, what, 6 extra ounces in a small, out of the way package. That's enough to escape a belay with a load-releasing hitch or to jug up a rope if a rappel doesn't reach the ground or next anchor; even if I don't have the rack.

Most importantly KNOW HOW TO USE THE GEAR YOU DO HAVE. Have you practiced escaping a weighted belay, or transferring from rappel to ascending a rope? Just as importantly, do your partners know these skills?

Gear doesn't help if you don't have both the knowledge and practice of how to get out of bad situations.


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By will smith
From boulder
Jan 14, 2011

Chris Plesko wrote:
and if you need to partner rescue?


use slings with a Machard knot bachman (sp) knot, these seem to work better with slings than the prusik. I also have cord on my nut tool which I forgot to list.


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By Chris Plesko
From Westminster, CO
Jan 14, 2011
OMG, I winz!!!

will smith wrote:
use slings with a Machard knot bachman (sp) knot, these seem to work better with slings than the prusik. I also have cord on my nut tool which I forgot to list.


Then it's more than you listed right? The rack slings do no good if they're all with the leader when he needs rescue. I don't carry much but 2 prussic cords/slings whatever gives you a lot more rescue ability. I don't really carry or consider a cordalette enough as cutting it up to make what you need could be a huge time waste in an emergency.


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By will smith
From boulder
Jan 14, 2011

Chris Plesko wrote:
Then it's more than you listed right?


Correct, I'm old and sometime forget wait 40 years. I use slings equalized in the anchor, 2 most often, one is often extra.

The whole idea of rescue of the leader depends on how far out he is, more than half a rope length complicates things greatly.


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By Chris Plesko
From Westminster, CO
Jan 14, 2011
OMG, I winz!!!

will smith wrote:
Correct, I'm old and sometime forget wait 40 years. I use slings equalized in the anchor, 2 most often, one is often extra. The whole idea of rescue of the leader depends on how far out he is, more than half a rope length complicates things greatly.


Heh, no doubt. I just want to present an accurate picture to those new climbing lurkers like I was. I personally don't like to rely on having to steal something out of the anchor as that's not constant like your personal gear can be. I mean you could cut up the rope but that's going to be sloooooow.

My friends and I held a "climbing accident" rescue day with top rope backups and it was hugely eye opening. I don't go out on multipitch without a prussic and a personal shoulder length runner anymore. Ideally I'd take a little more like an personal double length sling but with those 2 I know I can do quite a lot. The prussic is also my rappel autoblock if needed and the nylon sling (I usually carry dyneema) is my rappel setup backup sling since the nylon is more heat friendly than dyneema and rapping puts the sling near a potentially hot device. On a climb I tie in with the rope all the time.


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By Jeff J
From Bozeman
Jan 14, 2011

WilliamJ wrote:
We all know about the rack but what else do you bring up with you on multi pitch routes? cordelettes, webbing, extra slings, spare binners for anchors, prusiks, bail gear? Whats your method of getting it all on your harness?


For me, all my active pro goes on my shoulder sling for smallest to largest, usually im leading and that the way I like to rack it.

On my harness.
one set of stoppers divided in to 1/3 s, m, l each on it own biner.
6 quick draws
25ish feet of cordolet.
master point/belay biner and belay device.
chalk bag with rain shell
nut tool
10 or so extendable draws

my second carries the rest of the crap


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By Larry S
Jan 14, 2011
The wife and I road-trippin on the Connie.

Andrew Hildner wrote:
THowever, I've seen it several times where the belayer is hosed when their partner (with the whole rack) gets injured or separated from them (like on rappel)--leaving the belayer without enough gear to escape the belay or self-rescue.


Not to undermine your point at all, what you said after this was very good. Crossing and I usually each carry our racks and swing lead. No changeover time at belays, no worrying that you built your anchor on things you need for the next pitch. And, i hadn't though of this till now, no worrying about what you need if you have to do a rescue. You've got a rack. The second gets in, hands you a sling with all your gear he cleaned, and he's ready to lead the next pitch. Sucks for long approaches though.

I almost had something like what you describe happen to me one time we didn't climb that way though. As a second, i fell pulling a roof and swung out into space. Had my tiblocs in the chalk bag, two pieces i cleaned, and what was used in the anchor. I had just enough gear to jug the rope up to the next piece. This is somewhere a cordolette comes in handy. Yes, I could have been lowered, so it wasn't a real emergency, but made me realize the second should always have enough on them to jug if they have to.


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By Rich Farnham
Jan 15, 2011

Larry S wrote:
...Crossing and I usually each carry our racks and swing lead...no worrying about what you need if you have to do a rescue. You've got a rack. The second gets in, hands you a sling with all your gear he cleaned, and he's ready to lead the next pitch. Sucks for long approaches though...


Wait, you each climb with a separate rack? So when you get to the top of cleaning a long pitch, you are basically wearing two racks? I guess whatever works for you, but that seems like a lot of extra weight for a debatable benefit.


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By martinharris
From Glenwood Springs CO
May 21, 2011

i realaize that bad things happen but it seams like some of you are a little crazy with taking way to much stuff. Worst case scenario you should be able to fix a line and if you are on something longer than 3 or 4 pitches are probably going to have 2 ropes. with 2 ropes some finagaling i am sure you would be able to get your self out of a lot of situations.


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By Kevin Craig
May 21, 2011
KC on Fields (medium).  Photo (c) Doug Shepherd

4 Lockers (3 BD Vaporlocks and 1 of whatever that stupid-light little Wild Country locker is)
BD ATC Guide
Knife (Trango Piranha)
Tibloc
Autoblock cord
Short prussik
Rescue cordalette
Oh-shit 'biner
Chalk bag

and the one thing no one has mentioned yet.... Petzl e-Lite (if you always have it, you'll never forget it, weighs nothing, and makes a huge difference if/when you're out later than you thought you would be)


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By Colonel Mustard
From Reno, NV
May 21, 2011
Colonel Mustard

Jay Knower wrote:
"They carried the common secret of cowardice barely restrained, the instinct to run or freeze or hide, and in many respects this was the heaviest burden of all, for it could never be put down, it required perfect balance and perfect posture." --Tim O'Brien, "The Things They Carried"


My favorite response, anyway.


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By Kilroywashere!
From Harrisonburg, Virginia
May 26, 2011
Kilroy

WilliamJ wrote:
We all know about the rack but what else do you bring up with you on multi pitch routes? cordelettes, webbing, extra slings, spare binners for anchors, prusiks, bail gear? Whats your method of getting it all on your harness?


best method of getting it on your harness is to buy a misty mountain cadillac, 6 gear loops then you can add one with some cordage! sa-weeeeet and comfortable too!

best thing i carry now a days is a petzl ok triact, with a tibloc and a pulley on it, as well as the stuff you mentioned, most importantly, bring knowledge and practiced skills out to the rock with you, spend the time, and understand the concepts of using these tools to your advantage, you never know when they could save your life, or the life of a partner.


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By DrApnea
From Salt Lake City, UT
Jun 3, 2011

great info.


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By Dominion Rognstad
From Houston. From Boone, NC
Sep 14, 2011
In the Grand Tetons 2010.

froggy wrote:
best method of getting it on your harness is to buy a misty mountain cadillac, 6 gear loops then you can add one with some cordage! sa-weeeeet and comfortable too!



Seconded. I have the Titan for working, it packs in more padding for a few ounces more, way comfy. The Misty guys are great at customizing orders if you want too.

I always make sure to have a knife, 2 prusiks, a locker and sling for a getaway. I usually carry a headlamp and water as well. I'm a pretty "wet" climber with the humidity of NC. Most people haven't mentioned any kind of medical supplies.

I wrap some tape around my rescue biner and carry a bandana on long climbs. You can stop bleeding with a little packet of cayenne pepper powder. Works just like a Quikclot would. Helpful for not bleeding down on your belayer ;) And made into a tea, it will help treat a heart attack.


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By DannyUncanny
From Vancouver
Sep 14, 2011

I don't usually have a pocket knife. I taped a razor blade into the back of my helmet. It's come in handy once.


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By chasegru
Sep 14, 2011

Belay Device
Anchor gear (cordelette, 2 lockers)
Rescue Gear (Tibloc, extra cordelette, prusik, gloves)
Personal Anchor (Double Length Runner)
Watch+Ring
3oz flask of Scotch (just thought of that one, and it's getting added this afternoon!)


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