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What does your Woody look like???
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Feb 5, 2014
Rock Climbing Photo: Rock Wars, RRG, 2008
Joe Kreidel wrote:
I did that on my wall, which is a bit more overhung than yours, and the PVC is much more of a jug than I expected. It is a great feature, but certainly won't train slopers. I'm also gangly and uncoordinated, and have a couple small volumes that I mount up high on my wall so I can't do too much damage to my knees and elbows. Definitely worth it for adding slopers to steeper wall. Atomik and Detroit Rock company make small volumes that are well priced.


Yes, another good move..place those big volumes up high, near crux or finish so you wont get more than maybe your chest above them, no knee crushing contact. At least if it's in your face, you can push away from it when you fall, instead of meeting it 10 ft. lower as you speed past it. Not just a knock to the leg, but edges can be sharp enough to cut you up too. Careful out there.
Woodchuck ATC
Joined Nov 29, 2007
3,181 points
Feb 6, 2014
Rock Climbing Photo: Church of the Lost and Found, Left. Summer 2013
Woodchuck ATC wrote:
Yes, another good move..place those big volumes up high, near crux or finish so you wont get more than maybe your chest above them, no knee crushing contact. .


Any advice on how to figure out the angles to cut the ply for those cool three sided pyramid volumes?
Tavis Ricksecker
From Bishop, ca
Joined Dec 30, 2006
3,992 points
Administrator
Feb 6, 2014
Rock Climbing Photo: Me and the offspring walking back to the car after...
Tavis Ricksecker wrote:
Any advice on how to figure out the angles to cut the ply for those cool three sided pyramid volumes?


Usually where the sides meet on pyramids are obtuse so if you cut the angle at 45 degrees, the outside edges will meet nicely. I screw a 2X2 on the inside of one of the sides that will meet to have something solid to screw the other side into without having to worry about a screw coming through the other side of the volume if that makes any sense. Hope this helps.

Basically just over cut the angles, but don't make them too sharp or you'll have problems with the sharp edges breaking. I could figure out the math and try to do it exactly, but it's just as easy to over cut a little and skip the meticulous time-consuming precision.

Something like this:

Rock Climbing Photo: Sorry for the heinous drawing
Sorry for the heinous drawing
Jake Jones
From Richmond, VA
Joined Jul 30, 2011
1,217 points
Feb 6, 2014
Rock Climbing Photo: Church of the Lost and Found, Left. Summer 2013
Jake Jones wrote:
Usually where the sides meet on pyramids are obtuse so if you cut the angle at 45 degrees, the outside edges will meet nicely. I screw a 2X2 on the inside of one of the sides that will meet to have something solid to screw the other side into without having to worry about a screw coming through the other side of the volume if that makes any sense. Hope this helps. Basically just over cut the angles, but don't make them too sharp or you'll have problems with the sharp edges breaking. I could figure out the math and try to do it exactly, but it's just as easy to over cut a little and skip the meticulous time-consuming precision. Something like this:


Cool man, thank you. I'll try it out.

Do you do something similar when framing odd shapes? For instance to blend to flat panels together.

I'm starting to realize that this whole carpentry thing is as much art as science. Will try this method and see how it goes :)
Tavis Ricksecker
From Bishop, ca
Joined Dec 30, 2006
3,992 points
Administrator
Feb 6, 2014
Rock Climbing Photo: Me and the offspring walking back to the car after...
Tavis Ricksecker wrote:
Cool man, thank you. I'll try it out. Do you do something similar when framing odd shapes? For instance to blend to flat panels together. I'm starting to realize that this whole carpentry thing is as much art as science. Will try this method and see how it goes :)


If you mean adjoining two pieces on the same plane, then yeah, I sure do. If your volume or whatever else you're fixing together is likely to stay together for a long time, consider using wood glue at the joints. It works wonders over time. I've done both ways, and with glue, the screws almost never loosen up in their holes, and the pieces stay solid for a long time. Also, when you're adjoining two pieces on the same plane, if you have a pneumatic staple gun, that works best. The holes are easy to fill (if you bother with such details) and will do far less damage than screws, and they hold better than finish nails.

If you're screwing from plywood to plywood on an angle (like the "short screw" part of the diagram) pilot holes are your friend.

The key to good volumes is straight lines. If you don't have a table saw, then find a nice straight piece of 3/4 that you can clamp to whatever you're cutting so that you can rest your circular saw against it to get a nice straight cut. (you probably already know this, I'm just throwing it out there)

You'll get it after a while. I did finish carpentry in the form of cabinets and interior and exterior mouldings for about 8 years before I ever started climbing, so that helped. There is a bit of a learning curve, but after you figure out the basics and little tricks like slightly over cutting to get a nice seam at a joint, then it gets to be really fun.

Good luck dude. Carpentry is awesome.
Jake Jones
From Richmond, VA
Joined Jul 30, 2011
1,217 points
Feb 6, 2014
Rock Climbing Photo: Church of the Lost and Found, Left. Summer 2013
Thanks man, your advice is appreciated. Tavis Ricksecker
From Bishop, ca
Joined Dec 30, 2006
3,992 points
Feb 6, 2014
Rock Climbing Photo: BETA: For me, crux move was sticking the move to t...
Check andylibrande.com for building 3 sided triangle volumes before you try that method. Andy's method doesn't require cutting 45* angles on each edge and works really well! You can use it to make equal sided pyramids, or have the edges different lengths Drew Nevius
From Oklahoma
Joined Jun 27, 2012
881 points
Feb 7, 2014
I'm in the process of building a woody in my garage and I'm looking to purchase some holds. I've been looking at a bunch of different companies and reviews. I'm wanting to spend around $250 shipped for the first starter set of holds.

I've found what I feel are two pretty good deals.

AffordableClimbingHolds

Atomik Holds

Has anybody found any other good starter sets for around $250?
Will Morgan
Joined Jan 15, 2014
72 points
Feb 7, 2014
Rock Climbing Photo: My Hero
Will Morgan wrote:
I'm in the process of building a woody in my garage and I'm looking to purchase some holds. I've been looking at a bunch of different companies and reviews. I'm wanting to spend around $250 shipped for the first starter set of holds. I've found what I feel are two pretty good deals. AffordableClimbingHolds Atomik Holds Has anybody found any other good starter sets for around $250?



Try threeballclimbing

threeballclimbing.com/
threeballclimbing.com/rock/bea...
threeballclimbing.com/rockclim...


They have lots of different sets, their holds are fantastic and you won't find better customer service anywhere.
BobGray
From Salt Lake City, Utah
Joined Jun 7, 2006
692 points
Administrator
Feb 7, 2014
Rock Climbing Photo: Courtright Reservoir, September 2013
I agree, Threeball folks are great. You can also contact Ryan at Prinz Climbing holds as well.. SoIll also makes some great holds too Adam Stackhouse
Joined Jan 3, 2001
13,990 points
Feb 9, 2014
Rock Climbing Photo: Church of the Lost and Found, Left. Summer 2013
BobGray wrote:
Try threeballclimbing h



I second Atomik. Buuda also has some great sets for super cheap. Three Ball - I liked the holds but didn't feel that I got my money's worth.

Thanks for the beta on the volumes guys

current progress, starting on the plywood tomorrow
Rock Climbing Photo: ready for ply
ready for ply
Tavis Ricksecker
From Bishop, ca
Joined Dec 30, 2006
3,992 points
Feb 9, 2014
Rock Climbing Photo: The front yard
Dry tooling woody. Could be about 2 feet taller and still be safe. however up and down/side to side = pump

Rock Climbing Photo: Woody
Woody


Rock Climbing Photo: Calum
Calum
Eldo Love
From Mancos,CO
Joined Sep 9, 2012
125 points
Feb 9, 2014
Rock Climbing Photo: Church of the Lost and Found, Left. Summer 2013
'Sok, i have library envy. And.. BRRR Tavis Ricksecker
From Bishop, ca
Joined Dec 30, 2006
3,992 points
Administrator
Feb 10, 2014
Rock Climbing Photo: Courtright Reservoir, September 2013
Tavis,

As an fyi, i have purchased most of my Threeball holds via cosmetic seconds. Saves a lot of money.
Adam Stackhouse
Joined Jan 3, 2001
13,990 points
Feb 10, 2014
Rock Climbing Photo: Church of the Lost and Found, Left. Summer 2013
Adam Stackhouse wrote:
Tavis, As an fyi, i have purchased most of my Threeball holds via cosmetic seconds. Saves a lot of money.


Word. They didn't have much in that department when I looked on the website. I bought one of the largest hold sets and although the holds themselves are quality, the set was very heavy in small crimps and foot jibs. I simply didn't think it was worth the money.

The set I got from Atomik for a bit less money had similar quality holds and larger holds on average. I think if you compared the two simply by weight the Atomik set probably had 30% more weight and cost 30% less, the quality seemed to be the same.

And then there is Buuda. Man you can get a big hold set from them for less than 50% of what the other two companies sell. And they are good holds. My only complaint was that the holds were dirty when they arrived. Like, dusty - as if they had been stored in some grimy warehouse somewhere. I am going to have to wash the whole set before I set with it. But... You get what you pay for. In this case the quality and quantity were both good and the price was low but it's bizarre, you would never get dirty holds from a company in the USA
Tavis Ricksecker
From Bishop, ca
Joined Dec 30, 2006
3,992 points
Feb 10, 2014
Rock Climbing Photo: Church of the Lost and Found, Left. Summer 2013
Yer profile pic Tavis Ricksecker
From Bishop, ca
Joined Dec 30, 2006
3,992 points
Feb 11, 2014
Tavis Ricksecker wrote:
And then there is Buuda. Man you can get a big hold set from them for less than 50% of what the other two companies sell.



How are you getting such good prices from Buuda? I looked on their site and the prices are the same as Soill-around $10 per pound.

I have a lot of Atomic holds which are good enough, but not as interesting as Soill, which cost a fortune! Unfortunately my wall is so steep I can't seem to set problems with anything less than a finger jug or really good pinch, so interesting holds don't really do anything for me!
GhaMby
From Heaven
Joined Oct 2, 2006
427 points
Feb 11, 2014
Rock Climbing Photo: Church of the Lost and Found, Left. Summer 2013
Ebay - 85 hold sets listed at $225 OBO, you can haggle them down a bit. Maybe they aren't being sold by the manufacturer but I think they are - they shipped from Mexico Tavis Ricksecker
From Bishop, ca
Joined Dec 30, 2006
3,992 points
Feb 23, 2014
Rock Climbing Photo: Church of the Lost and Found, Left. Summer 2013
Rock Climbing Photo: Finished and set
Finished and set
Tavis Ricksecker
From Bishop, ca
Joined Dec 30, 2006
3,992 points
Feb 23, 2014
Rock Climbing Photo: At bolt 6 (or 5?)
Damn, I'm almost embarrassed to share mine after that amazing home bouldering cave pic, but here's my system board in the garage:

Rock Climbing Photo: System board + other training implements
System board + other training implements


Dry tooling until the ice melts out, rock system board afterwards! I'll probably get a bunch more rock holds to build a symmetric training board.
Ignacio
From Denver, CO
Joined Sep 27, 2010
27 points
Feb 23, 2014
Rock Climbing Photo: Me on some janky piece of shit in Seigankyo
Good lord, Tavis, that looks better than the commercial gyms I go to. Any estimate on total cost of materials/holds? That looks amazing and I'd pay to climb on it. Tony Monbetsu
Joined Jan 14, 2014
259 points
Feb 23, 2014
Rock Climbing Photo: Church of the Lost and Found, Left. Summer 2013
Tony Monbetsu wrote:
Good lord, Tavis, that looks better than the commercial gyms I go to. Any estimate on total cost of materials/holds? That looks amazing and I'd pay to climb on it.


Tony, I think we've dropped about $6K or a little more. Didn't need to spend so much on framing, think we could have saved close to $1K by using smaller pieces - its primarily 2x10 on the bigger/steeper panels. The lights are LED so they don't make much heat and will never burn out but were expensive, could have saved at least $1K by getting cheaper lights. But then we were given over $2K of holds as well so I'm going to go ahead and guess that to build this a little cheaper but buying all the holds would still run $5-6K
Tavis Ricksecker
From Bishop, ca
Joined Dec 30, 2006
3,992 points
Feb 24, 2014
Tavis, that is the most professional looking wall I've seen on this site! Nice job... TBlom
Joined Jun 29, 2004
426 points
Feb 25, 2014
Rock Climbing Photo: Church of the Lost and Found, Left. Summer 2013
Thanks man. Idunno Greg's is pretty nice too :) Tavis Ricksecker
From Bishop, ca
Joined Dec 30, 2006
3,992 points
Feb 25, 2014
This whole thread is awesome and inspirational. Great work everyone. Steve_Sil.
From Los Angeles, CA
Joined May 10, 2012
43 points


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