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Devil's Den Bouldering
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Universal Socket (aka The Pocket Problem) 

Hueco: V6 Font: 7A

   
Type:  Boulder, 18'
Consensus:  Hueco: V6 Font: 7A [details]
FA: Brett Meyers
Page Views: 2,514
Submitted By: Tristan Perry on Dec 28, 2007

You & This Route  |  Other Opinions (8)
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the pocket problem

Description 

Begin by traversing a horizontal crack system to gain a series of good, incut monos (or two-finger pockets). Yard up on these odd holds, taking care to use the right sequence. Make a long, committing move to the left arete on a rounded sloping hold. Then make another big move way off the deck to the positive holds at the top. There could be cosequences to a fall here. Mantle.


Location 

Underneath some bolted route, by a cave on a hill of Devil's Den


Protection 

Pad



Photos of Universal Socket (aka The Pocket Problem) Slideshow Add Photo
pocket problem
pocket problem
the pocket problem
the pocket problem
such a cool looking problem
such a cool looking problem
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By Lanky
From: Portland, ME
Mar 24, 2010
rating: V5 6C

Nice problem. The pockets are definitely not monos, and one of them is more like a crimp than a pocket, but they're still cool and unusual features (especially for NE granite). There are also decent holds on the arete below the key spot. Most of the difficulty of the problems lies in committing to the last move.

By Christian Prellwitz
From: Telluride, CO
Nov 16, 2013
rating: V6+ 7A

While the committing last move is definitely the mental crux, this problem is still physically challenging and definitely deserving of the v6 grade (on the harder side in my opinion). It climbs more like a route, with no real defined crux, but lots of sustained difficulty.

Either way, it's an excellent climb and worth doing if you can confidently climb that grade.

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