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Endurance
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By koreo
From Denver, CO
Jan 6, 2010
sloping <br />

So, I can boulder pretty damn hard, I can send most advanced problems in the gym, (I don't know where I sit on the V scale, haven't been outdoors and probably won't go until it warms up.) I can send 5.11s, but I'm so pumped afterwards. Aside from down climbing, and traversing like a mad man, are there any other methods to improve endurance and stamina?


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By Abram Herman
From Golden, CO
Jan 7, 2010
Viking helmet cover, yep.

From "The making of a rock prodigy":

www.rockclimbing.com/Articles/Training_and_Technique/The_Mak>>>

"ARC
The purpose of Aerobic Restoration and Capillarity training is to improve your muscles’ ability to produce sustained effort without surpassing the “anaerobic threshold”. There are many books that I’m not going to plagiarize that will give you a more scientific explanation, but basically, ARC increases the level you can climb at without getting hopelessly pumped. For example, if you can execute sustained 5.10 moves for 30 minutes without getting pumped, then you can probably climb most 5.11 routes, which probably consist of “mostly” 5.10 climbing, with a 10+ or 11- crux. So if you could raise that “threshold”, then your climbing ability would improve.

An ARC workout involves sustained climbing, usually in a climbing gym, right below your anaerobic threshold. I typically do this workout by bouldering, without a break, for 30 minutes straight. The trick is to temper the difficulty of moves just right so that you are right below your threshold. Here are some tips: If you get severely pumped, the moves are too difficult. If you are climbing without any feeling of pump, and are not sweating, then they are too easy. A good ARC session should have you breathing heavily, slightly pumped (on the verge of pumping out, but not quite), and lightly sweating after the first 10 minutes or so. It takes practice to figure this out. A typical ARC workout would be two or three 30 minute sets with 10 minutes of rest between each set. Bring your IPOD!"


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By Brent Apgar
From Out of the Loop
Jan 7, 2010
Me and Spearhead

This may sound weird at first but part of route climbing is about relaxing and only using the least amount of strength to hang on to the holds that you need.
Bouldering, unfortunately, doesn't really train this attribute very well. You may find that trying to do moderate problems w/ out getting pumped (by focusing on staying relaxed) may help w/ some route endurance.
Just one thought other than brute mileage and laps.
BA


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By koreo
From Denver, CO
Jan 7, 2010
sloping <br />

Abram Herman wrote:
Bring your IPOD!"


Only one problem, don't have an ipod. But thanks for the advice.


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By Abram Herman
From Golden, CO
Jan 7, 2010
Viking helmet cover, yep.

koreo wrote:
Only one problem, don't have an ipod. But thanks for the advice.

:) I can't take credit, all of it was taken from the article. Definitely a worthwhile read, though.


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By Rafe
Jan 7, 2010
hardman

Well, what I do during enduro phase is to find a boulder problem to up and down climb that is moderate and isn't weird to downclimb. Send it as many times, up and down, as is possible without stepping off the wall and record how many times I did it. Then do the same on easier problems until your obviously toast.

In a week or two you'll be cranking way more laps on those routes you've been practicing lappping, building efficiency of movement and endurance....given you take an adequate rest period between sessions.

This method takes a lot of determination though. The enduro burn hurts like a mofo, and after your first burn you really don't want to go back for more. Find a friend to share the pain with, or get an Ipod.


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By Abram Herman
From Golden, CO
Jan 7, 2010
Viking helmet cover, yep.

And also be very cautious of overuse injuries. Do it too often and you'll get tendonitis in a hurry!


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By Kevin Stricker
From Evergreen, CO
Jan 7, 2010

I am guessing that what you are really trying to improve is your power-endurance. Endurance is trained and tested at an intensity that does not make you mad-pumped. If you are getting pumped and you are climbing a 50 foot gym route what you really are getting worked by is your lack of power-endurance.

Power Endurance training has high injury potential. If you are just getting into climbing be very careful not to injure yourself. I would recommend instead to focus on your movement and ability to find rests. Like Brent said, your tactics in climbing gym routes are almost as important as your fitness.

Your tempo, i.e. how fast or slow you climb, can really effect your level of "pumpedness". When bouldering you tend to go all out, as you are only on the wall for a short time. When route climbing you want to climb smoothly and sometimes slowly, shaking out when possible, then punching it through the crux. Knowing when to climb quickly and when to milk rests is more important than your fitness in my opinion.

Anyways a good drill that can help with your tactics, and also your power endurance is to find a route that is below your redpoint level and climb it a lot. Get in the habit of climbing it a few times every time you are in the gym. Then when possible start doing it twice in a row. Once you can do this consider climbing it, down climbing it, then climbing it again. It is best to work on the same route so you get it sauced. Figure out the best rests, when you can climb slow and when you have to climb fast.

Good Luck.


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