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Winterfest Wall
Routes Sorted
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A Quark for Quayle T 
Abortion Control T 
Anartichoke S 
Big Rattler T 
Bimbo in Limbo S 
Brokendown Shanty T,S 
Bush Loves Detroit T 
Cat's Meow S 
Consolation T 
Crawling Up Roseanne's Belly S 
Dissolution, The S 
Driving Over Stella S 
Dweeb T,S 
Fractions S 
Generica S 
Interstellar Overdrive S 
Jell-O Brand Napalm T 
Killian's Red S 
Leaning Pillar T,S 
Nouveau Reach aka Jeff's Third Climb aka Photo Art S 
Pass The Tanning Butter S 
Pseudo Bullet S 
Pumcat S 
Rebel Yell S 
Resolution, The S 
Runt T,TR 
Silver Bullet S 
Sunset Arete S 
Tanning Butter S 
Too Dumb to Sleep In T 
Twinkletoes S 
Under The Wire S 
Whole Lot of Drunk S 

The Resolution 

YDS: 5.11c French: 6c+ Ewbanks: 24 UIAA: VIII- ZA: 24 British: E4 6a

   
Type:  Sport, 1 pitch
Consensus:  YDS: 5.11c French: 6c+ Ewbanks: 24 UIAA: VIII- ZA: 24 British: E4 6a [details]
FA: Ken Trout, Guy Lords, Jim Garber, 1/1/91
Page Views: 610
Submitted By: Richard M. Wright on Aug 28, 2001

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Description 

The Resolution was part of the early wave of climbing to hit North Table Mountain nearly ten years ago. The climbing begins 60 -75 feet to the right of the cluster of routes defined by The Silver Bullet and An Artichoke. To the right of the Leaning Pillar and in a small alcove/corner are two longish faces running parallel on the same face and converging on the same anchor. The Resolution is the right of the two. Chase thin and perplexing finger tip liebacks for three clips to easier terrain and bigger holds. Things get a little spacey getting to the anchor, but the climbing is never difficult after the first half of the route. Excellent stone, complex sequences, and reasonable pro all add up to another fine addition from Ken and the bandits who joined him here.

Protection 

Bring half a dozen draws and something for the double bolt anchor at the top.


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By Richard M. Wright
From: Lakewood, CO
Aug 28, 2001

More on grading - Ken Trout has described The Resolution as being 5.11c but "seems like 5.12 until you get it wired". My question is, is this an appropriate way to grade? Shouldn't the grade reflect the difficulty of solving the crux as an on-sight problem and not as a rehearsed problem? All routes feel much easier once the moves have been solved and a most efficient solution been found. It is common-place for a difficult route to seem very easy once there is no need to solve the sequence problem. So what principle guides us in selecting a grade? We have all agreed that reference to a "Gold-Standard" is a useful part of grading. But, I would submit that the grade should reflect the problem confronted by the on-sight climber who will necessarily climb without optimal efficiency. Frankly, I think that the on-sight difficulty of The Resolution is harder than 5.11c. Likewise, the on-sight difficulty of Ten Digit Dialing is much harder than 5.12a/b.
By Nate Weitzel
Aug 29, 2001

Comment on Grading: It seems as if there are different ideas of how the route should be graded. Many areas (ie Rifle) place the grade using the best beta possible, with the perfect conditions and having the beta in hand; ie "wired". This means a practiced redpoint. My opinion is that this is the appropriate way to grade a route. That said, an onsight often uses harder beta and many times less than perfect conditions, and is therefore much more impressive if someone does onsight the route. By keeping to this standard, you do not run the risk of climbing a route using a more difficult sequence, and then overgrading it. This also tells visiting climbers that if you are climbing a 5.12a, and it feels like 5.13a, then you are likely using the wrong sequence.My two pennies worth.
By Richard M. Wright
From: Lakewood, CO
Aug 29, 2001

The advantage to grading under the best of circumstances and with the best beta possible is that the grade reflects the intrinsic characteristic of the route and not the climber or the conditions. I could be happy with this.
By Richard M. Wright
From: Lakewood, CO
Aug 29, 2001

Perhaps I should not be so quick to concede the point. If the optimal performance standard were applied strictly to sport climbs, then it may make sense. However, for the vast majority of trad climbs, it does not apply very well.
By Nate Weitzel
Aug 30, 2001

I agree that there is much more to describe a routes challenge and nature than the perfect beta and conditions. This is what makes sustained, versus bouldery versus endurance routes. Also it is what makes a route a three star classic, vs choss pile. I submit that the subjective nature of each climb is what makes them memorable for the climber, but the number grade should still be a quantitative measure of the approximate difficulty, under defined conditions. This is not to measure the size of your ego, but more to guide you in your decision to try a route for yourself.

Of course, almost none of the routes I actually make it up are done under these conditions, and I always tend to make the routes harder than they should be. But this makes them more enjoyable for me. I do appreciate having a good standard rating however to help choose my torture,
By Richard M. Wright
From: Lakewood, CO
Aug 30, 2001

Q.E.D. (Quod Erat Demonstrandum)
By JD Mitch
Dec 8, 2003

Look if you like the climb then climb it, quit talking about the rating and get out on the rock. This goes for all areas. Betas kewl to discuss but tweaking ratings is kinda lame. If you like the climb then tick it off. If not pass.
By Geoff U
From: Highlands Ranch, CO
Dec 14, 2009

Does anyone have any beta for the crux (between bolts 2 and 3)? This definitely felt harder than 11c to me....