Login with Facebook
 ADVANCED
Poke-O-Moonshine Main Face
Routes Sorted
L to R R to L Alpha
7 year itch T,S 
Air Male T,S 
Arch Crack T,S 
Bloody Mary T 
Borderline T 
Bushido (Pitch 1 only) T 
C-Tips S 
Casual Observer T,S 
Certified Raw T 
Chik'n Garbonzo T 
Cirrhosis T 
Cooney-Norton T 
Cosmopolitan Wall T 
Earthly Night S 
Fastest Gun, The T 
Firing Line T 
FM, The T 
Gamesmanship T 
Grapes of Wrath T 
Great Dihedral, The T 
Green Onion T 
Group Therapy T 
Hang 'Em High T,S 
It Don't Come Easy T 
Junior Varsity T 
La Spirale T 
Ladder T 
Lost Chance aka The Natural  T 
Macho T,S 
Maestro T 
Mayflower T 
Menace To Sobriety S 
Morning Star T 
P.T. Pillar T 
Pandemonium T 
Paralysis T 
Phase III T 
Pilgrim's Progress T 
Pillar T 
Psalm 32 T,S 
Psychosis T 
Puppies on Edge T 
Ragtime T 
Raptor's Sream S 
Rapture, The T,S 
Salad Days S 
Scallion T 
Snake Slide T 
Snatch, The T 
Son of a Mother T,S 
Son of Slime T 
Southern Hospitality p1 T 
Static Cling T,S 
Sting, The T 
Sunburst Arete T 

The Great Dihedral 

YDS: 5.9+ French: 5c Ewbanks: 17 UIAA: VI ZA: 17 British: E1 5a PG13

   
Type:  Trad, 3 pitches, 450', Grade II
Consensus:  YDS: 5.9+ French: 5c Ewbanks: 17 UIAA: VI ZA: 17 British: E1 5a [details]
FA: Richard Goldstone and Ivan Rezucha 7/1976
Page Views: 1,177
Submitted By: Ed Wade on Aug 19, 2012

You & This Route  |  Other Opinions (10)
Your todo list:
Your stars:
Your rating: -none- [change]
Your ticklist: [add new tick]
Your opinion of this PAGE:    [0 people like this page.]
Great Dihedral

  • Access is limited in the spring and summer due to peregrine falcon nesting; so there are some closures. Checking with the Adirondack Climbers Coalition or the NYDEC can provide the closure status.
  • Peregrine closures and approach trail issues MORE INFO >>>

  • Description 

    The obvious right facing dihedral that starts about 100 ft. off the ground. P1 starts by climbing cracks and blocks to a belay below the roof that is the base of the corner 5.8 (an uninteresting pitch) 100 ft. P2 climb up from the belay into the roof/chimney and then make a weird move back down and to the right to get established in the corner. Climb the beautiful dihedral (fingers, hands, stemming, a little OW ) for 150 ft. Maybe the best 5.9 pitch in the Adirondacks with excellent pro. P3 look for a bolt directly above then climb out right about 15 ft. then back left to clip the bolt then wander to the top looking for gear placements 5.8 pg13. A committing lead that is seldom done. Most parties rap from anchors at the top of the corner.

    Location 

    This is the right facing corner of the huge block with the Snatch (left side corner). It's start is just before you head downhill toward Gamesmanship. Most parties rappel the route after P2 with 2 ropes.

    Protection 

    A full rack up to #4 camalot.The corner takes wires nicely. There is a bolt on the face out left (another climb) that you can clip while doing the short offwidth section. Use long runners before the roof or backclean to reduce ropedrag. Anchors at the first belay and bolt anchors at the top of the corner.


    Comments on The Great Dihedral Add Comment
    Show which comments
    By rgold
    From: Poughkeepsie, NY
    Mar 1, 2013

    Although it is true that Ivan and I made the first free ascent of Pitch 2 in 1976, the first two pitches were climbed the year before by Geoff Smith and Dave Hough using a single point of aid at the crux of Pitch 2. (I should add that Ivan and I had no idea whether anyone had climbed the route when we tried it. Ivan had been thinking about trying it for a while.)

    After Pitch 2, Ivan and I declined to try the unprotected-looking current Pitch 3 and instead finished via the SRT. I later returned and did Pitch 3, but by then Smith and Hough had returned themselves and done it, placing a bolt after a very awkward and trying unprotected traverse.

    Thus the first free ascent of the complete route was by Smith and Hough in 1976. However, it seems that their third pitch has never found much favor, and so most parties end their engagement with the first two pitches freed by Ivan and me.
    By Ben Brotelho
    From: Albany, NY
    Apr 16, 2013

    Rgold...got any pics of this route? Maybe Ivan does. I've been wanting to do this one for quite a while now!
    By Mark Trotta
    From: Latham, NY
    Aug 25, 2013

    Comments about gear:

    I recommend building a gear anchor at the top of pitch one above the chockstone that is wrapped with tat that normally passes for the anchor. You'll be a lot more comfortable: no hanging belay. Threrfore bring an extra #2 & #3 for that.

    I got by using only the lone fixed sling for the Houdini slot crux but looking back that wasn't the safest. I recommend a #3 or #4 deep in the top of the slot for that crux. The rest can go with a single set of cams. In fact the small ones can be replaced by nuts only. Only other thing I recommend is to skip the bolt protection of the off width and do it with a little more style: bring a #5 or #6. They might need to be buried but hey.

    Also the rope will really drag if its been pulled in under the slot so take care to extnd those pieces adequately.
    By rgold
    From: Poughkeepsie, NY
    Apr 29, 2014

    Hmm. Perhaps worth noting that when Ivan and I did the route, nuts were all we had, and nothing as big as those recommended cams. Of course, there was no bolt in the offwidth either.

    I protected the exit from what now seems to be called the Houdini Slot by climbing up into it, reaching around to the outside, and placing a nut in the crack in the dihedral. Normally, this would be a totally blind placement but in this case I could observe what I was doing from "inside" the crack because of my position in the slot. This gave overhead protection for the moves out of the slot and only required a normal-sized piece of gear, as did the rest of the route.
    By Jim Lawyer
    Administrator
    Apr 30, 2014

    RG: Well, there's not a bolt "in the offwidth". It's left, around the corner, and on another route. That said, the fact that it can be clipped from this route is seen by many to be too close, and takes something away from the aesthetics and adventure of this great line. It's still there, so perhaps nobody cares enough about it.