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Sean McColl Training Video
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By Jeff Chrisler
From Boulder, CO
Aug 17, 2012

i think we can all agree that chris sharma is one of the best sport climber and boulderer in the world.

a lot of folks get frustrated hearing him discuss climbing technique and his training. he only touches upon the things he does because it might not work for anyone else. he usually refers to 'doing something that you enjoy and keeps you psyched.' for him, this is climbing, A LOT, outside, and to a point, this seems to be the majority of his training. he works the movements, 'fails' many times. for some people this sort of 'training' simply won't work primarily because of mindset (repeated failure is hard for many to overcome). many people need to do pullups not only to become stronger, but also be confident and have the groundwork to make the crux and heady moves.

lessons here- no matter what form of climbing you do, if you want to get better, the best way to do that is vastly different for everyone. there has to be a lot of self experimentation and seeing what sort of training works for you. a lot of folks will never do this and would rather just follow a series of routines that someone has come up with. i don't pretend to know anything about SCC, but to me, the most successful self coached climber will be the one who experiments with several different training routines and builds new ones based on how they went for them.


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By JLP
From The Internet
Aug 17, 2012

Monomaniac wrote:
Interesting that this has devolved into an argument about the importance of finger strength vs. technique. Those who climb at areas with powerful cruxes advocate for finger strength, those who don't advocate for technique.

I think the same dichotomy exists between people who are naturally strong, lightweight, lanky, tall, etc. Everyone who talks about training seems to most strongly emphasize how to get through what they found to be their own area of greatest weakness. A naturally strong or lightweight climber isn't as likely to emphasize strength training.

+1 for Douglas sounding like a leg humper.


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By Casey Ryback
Aug 17, 2012
Chief Petty Officer and former Navy Seal turned chef

Dave Macleod Tweet about Sean McColl core exercises

I guess this guy must also be really detached from the scientific community, even though he lectures at Oxford on sports science....


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By Will S
From Joshua Tree
Aug 17, 2012

The SCC guy had some good points despite his tone, primarily that the best athletes don't necessarily make good training models to follow, and they don't necessarily know whether their methods are sound, probably don't make the best coaches, etc. (This isn't intended to reflect on Sean, all we saw was a snippet, we don't know his training plan/schedule)

But some of the minutia SCC guy gets into is a little crazy and "off" IMO. Like saying the core exercise is useless because of flexion, etc. I mean really, how many times when bouldering near your limit on plastic do you have feet cut and have to hold a swing and re-paste them?...It happens a lot for me. It's the nature of climbing gymnastic plastic problems, and if I were training for climbing in indoor comps, I think that exercise would be quite specific actually.

People tend to think of "train your weakest link" as style specific...like slabs, or technical balancey vertical or whatever. But that also applies to strength, and it's hard to know what is limiting you. That's one more reason I think isolating them is very important, you are sure to hit the weakest (provided you do a full spectrum of exercises) but you don't undertrain the stronger links...they are still getting full attention.

If you look at say, coaches training powerlifters - for the bench press specialists sometimes the coaches will have them stop benching all together and focus on rotator cuff and midrange tricep stuff...and they return to the benchpress six or eight weeks later and destroy their prior bests despite not having performed the specific BP movement for a couple months.


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By koreo
From Denver, CO
Aug 17, 2012
sloping <br />

Nico Toscani wrote:
I guess this guy must also be really detached from the scientific community, even though he lectures at Oxford on sports science....


and he only climbs 5.14 and v14. He's a wind bag.


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By koreo
From Denver, CO
Aug 17, 2012
sloping <br />

Will S wrote:
If you look at say, coaches training powerlifters - for the bench press specialists sometimes the coaches will have them stop benching all together and focus on rotator cuff and midrange tricep stuff...and they return to the benchpress six or eight weeks later and destroy their prior bests despite not having performed the specific BP movement for a couple months.


I've seen the same thing back when I practiced muai thai. Elbows were my weapon of choice (i'm short) but for two weeks every two months we'd focus on the pugilistic skills (jabs, straights) and come back throwin heavier and faster elbows.


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By Charles Kinbote
From Brooklyn, NY
Aug 18, 2012
On Waimea, 5.10d

It doesn't surprise me that Mr. Hunter didn't like the video. The second half is all supplementary exercises. Hunter thinks all that stuff is a waste of time.

The folks over at climbing narc seem to be offended by Hunter's tone, and they're running to Sean's defense...but the video really isn't that good. Or is it just me? It doesn't tell you anything about Sean's training program; it's a workout snapshot.


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