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REI Dividend + Need a New Rope = Which rope?
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By kilonot
Jul 11, 2012
Charles Porter wrote:
I'm a new climber and was wondering about good info on ropes. Where can I go to get good accurate info on the different types of rope and uses, and maintenance? I've already paid the price for using the wrong rope once and am lucky I wasn't hurt, much.


Care to elaborate on that? Did you climb on a static rope or something?

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By Tapawingo
Jul 11, 2012
I was in the same boat 2 years ago and used my dividend to buy the New England Equinox. It's still in great shape and I've used it for TR, Sport, and multi-pitch trad with no problems. Its still nice and rigid and doesn't get coiled. Plus with the price difference you save compared to the petzl and mammut you can grab yourself a rope bag.

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By Tony B
From Around Boulder, CO
Jul 11, 2012
Got Milk? How about forearm pump? Tony leads "...
Bowens wrote:
(snip) For one, many climbs often involve top-roping for at least one climber involved (multipitch/most trad climbing). Second, the abuses from multipitch climbing seem to be just as harsh sometimes as top roping; don't you think that lead falls, rapelling, and winding trad pitches are harsh on a rope?. Third, the assumption that a climber's first rope will see a lot of top-roping seems far less than universally accurate; although in the first few months it saw more toprope action, at this point my first rope has seen as many pitches of lead climbing as it has top-rope belays, and the lead climbing has worn it out far worse than the top-roping. Why shouldn't I have made my first cord one that could transition well into multiple uses? Last, and most important I think, your logic, if valid (that you should get a cheaper rope just because it's going to where out) should apply with equal force to every rope a climber purchases, not just the first. No, I think that the price-point that one decides upon should be a factor of what they can afford and their intended usage. (snip)

Uhhh...
First off- top roping and following are not the same thing unless your follower always follows then lowers off on a slingshot belay.
Beginners are harder on ropes in general. Advanced leaders tend to be able to deal with winding pitches better via slingage and selective gear placements and...
Are less likely to be falling and lowering off multi-pitch clibs, etc...

Get a cheap beefy rope if you are a beginner.

As far as length goes - well, if you climb in an area with tall stuff, get the long rope. If you climb at Table, a 60m should be more than enough most of the time.

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By Philcybin
From costa mesa,ca
Jul 11, 2012
I just returned a 70M mammut tusk the other day. I really wanted to like it, it seemed like exactly what I wanted, but it was a twisted rope.
I'm sure most of the ones out there are great, but ours (me and my climbing partner) was a nightmare.
The leader would have to pause every 15 feet or so for the belayer to pull slack because it was so twisted up.
rapping would take twice as long too because it would twist up under you from the belay device
We just got a petzl nomad and I'm hoping for the best.

Good luck

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By Eric Fjellanger
Jul 11, 2012
Me on top of Chianti Spire
A good basic answer to "what rope" is whatever is the cheapest, dry-treaded rope < 10mm and at least 60m.

Philcybin wrote:
I just returned a 70M mammut tusk the other day. I really wanted to like it, it seemed like exactly what I wanted, but it was a twisted rope. I'm sure most of the ones out there are great, but ours (me and my climbing partner) was a nightmare. The leader would have to pause every 15 feet or so for the belayer to pull slack because it was so twisted up. rapping would take twice as long too because it would twist up under you from the belay device We just got a petzl nomad and I'm hoping for the best. Good luck


I have this rope and it's great. It wasn't constructed twisty, it got that way somehow. It might have been the way it came out of the packaging, or something else you did inadvertently. In the future you can let the twists out by hanging the rope off something tall and letting it dangle.

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By Scott McMahon
From Boulder, CO
Jul 11, 2012
Bocan
Philcybin wrote:
I just returned a 70M mammut tusk the other day. I really wanted to like it, it seemed like exactly what I wanted, but it was a twisted rope. I'm sure most of the ones out there are great, but ours (me and my climbing partner) was a nightmare. The leader would have to pause every 15 feet or so for the belayer to pull slack because it was so twisted up. rapping would take twice as long too because it would twist up under you from the belay device We just got a petzl nomad and I'm hoping for the best. Good luck


When I get a new rope I stand or sit there and flake it out like 10+ times during an evening of having a few pints. After that have you looked at how you coil your rope? Maybe (just a assumption) you're coiling it wrong, as that will cause the massive twists you experienced.

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By Charles Porter
Jul 11, 2012
Thanks for the info. As for elaboration, I used an old rope that should have been burned. It broke on me at 20 feet off the ground. I'm lucky I wasn't higher up. I knew I shouldn't have used it at the time but I did it anyways. I keep the 3 foot piece that was still attached to me with my gear as a reminder to check and maintain my gear before and after every use.

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By Daniel Wade
From Oakland, CA.
Jul 11, 2012
From REI's selection: Mammut Supersafe 10.2

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By caughtinside
From Oakland CA
Jul 11, 2012
Philcybin wrote:
I just returned a 70M mammut tusk the other day. I really wanted to like it, it seemed like exactly what I wanted, but it was a twisted rope. I'm sure most of the ones out there are great, but ours (me and my climbing partner) was a nightmare. The leader would have to pause every 15 feet or so for the belayer to pull slack because it was so twisted up. rapping would take twice as long too because it would twist up under you from the belay device We just got a petzl nomad and I'm hoping for the best. Good luck


100% user error.

Not necessarily a bad thing, some anchor orientations are a little screwy and will put a twist in any rope. Good news, you can fix it and you don't have to take it back to REI.

Rapping the full length will help. IF you don't have a rap available, tie your rope to a tree and drag your atc all the way down it. Flaking also helps a lot. Be sure to flake several times, and always start from the same end. If you alternate ends you'll just push twists back and forth.

Best bet it to understand what puts twists in rope, and then avoid them if possible. The main culprits are bad redirects and offset anchors.

I've put twists in every rope I've owned at some point or another, and i've been able to get them all out without much trouble. Good luck, and don't blame the rope for twists. I recommend blaming your partner.


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By Adam Stackhouse
Administrator
Jul 12, 2012
Courtright Reservoir, September 2013
Daniel Wade wrote:
From REI's selection: Mammut Supersafe 10.2


Yep!

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By Morgan Patterson
Administrator
Jul 12, 2012
Topo - Cliffs in Green
Sterling Velocity sux - worst rope I've used recently. Not smooth at all, dangerously slippery, and a pathetic sheath. I hated mine, it's sitting basically new in my closet with a core shot.

My old Maxium bipattern is amazing!

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By bearbreeder
Jul 12, 2012
Charles Porter wrote:
Thanks for the info. As for elaboration, I used an old rope that should have been burned. It broke on me at 20 feet off the ground. I'm lucky I wasn't higher up. I knew I shouldn't have used it at the time but I did it anyways. I keep the 3 foot piece that was still attached to me with my gear as a reminder to check and maintain my gear before and after every use.


could you list the circumstances of yr broken rope such as the type, diameter, history and age, pics of the rope and what you were climbing ... it would be very educational as ropes rarely break ...

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By Unassigned User
Jul 12, 2012
Not much advice other than buy a 70m! You will not regret it. 90% of my climbing is easily done with a 60m. However, that 10% where it is fantastic to have a 70m make it worth everything. Honestly you can TR things that you are to weak to climb(personal experience). On multi-pitch routes you don't have to worry much about rope stretching pitches. I followed a guy that used a 60m while I was learning multi-pitch. It was typical for him to use up the whole rope leaving me with less than 3 feet to play with. I bought a 70m because I hated that feeling as a belayer, and I have not used up the whole rope on a climb yet. Pure amazing peace of mind.

See profile pic for reference of 60m (leader is anchored off at time of pic btw)

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By Josh Cameron
From Moab, Colorado
Jul 14, 2012
Castleton Summit Sunset
I have a mammut infinity and a mammut supersafe. Would not buy the infinity again; it is infinitely dirty. But I do recommend the supersafe. Doesn't pick up dirt like the infinity and I love the way it feels oh so supple in my hands. Only problem is it runs on the thicker side. Though 10.2 ain't that thick, but comparatively speaking.

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