Route Guide - iPhone / Android - Partners - Forum - Photos - Deals - What's New - School of Rock
Login with Facebook
 ADVANCED
Recommend a daypack..
View Latest Posts in This Forum or All Forums
   Page 1 of 1.  
Follow replies to this topic? Notify me at the top of web site.
1

Email me.
 
By Evan Sanders
From Westminster, CO
Mar 30, 2011
Flaming Pumpkin

I'm not too knowledgeable on packs, so I'd like a few opinions. I'm looking for a day pack to use for 4-7 hour hikes with a compartment for a Platypus water pouch, and decent padding in the shoulder straps. I'd also like a pack with the netting that keeps that pack from pressing against your back, but that isn't completely necessary. I don't carry much, just climbing hardware/rope, and couple extra water bottles, some food and usually a camera. If you guys have any packs that you've considered to be really great I'd appreciate the recommendations.


FLAG
By Dave Deming
From Grand Junction CO
Mar 30, 2011

Well, there's some tradeoff's involved here. Immeadiately, the netting against the back speaks to an Osprey pack. Hydration bladder compatability is pretty standard in most packs and most packs around 30 liters or larger will have some type of frame. Personally, I use an Osprey Talon 44, might be a little big for a cragging pack, but I've used mine on everything from ski trips to day climbs to ice climbs. The 44 seems a bit difficult to find, but the 33's are pretty common. I don't work for Osprey, so I'm trying not to sound like a shill, but they are also based in Cortez CO and have an "anyplace, anytime" guarentee.
Just my .02


FLAG
By Derek Schroeder
From Flagstaff, AZ
Mar 30, 2011
Bowling Pin, Bishop CA

Agreed. Osprey packs are incredibly comfortable and have great ventilation. I am also a huge fan of Gregory packs for similar reasons. Camelbaks have the hydration system down, but the suspension on their packs put on the stress on my shoulders, which makes a pack with 5lbs in it feel like it has 30lbs in it after a few hours of hiking. The most important thing I look at is suspension. A good waistbelt (with a ventilated harness)will keep the pack square on your back and make carrying the weight more comfortable. Osprey and gregory daypacks typically have an expanding external compartment for a helmet which is a nice feature, and their attachment system for trekking poles/ice axes are actually functional unlike some other packs I've used. I would pick between these two:

www.ospreypacks.com/Packs/TalonSeriesActiveLightPursuitsMult>>>

www.gregorypacks.com/products/mens/technical/256/z-30


FLAG
By Dan Cucci
Mar 30, 2011

I have a few Osprey packs and highly recommend them. If you really want the mesh panel feature you will have to get something from the Stratos or Atmos series. It's a very nice feature for hot weather hiking. I like the extra room in my Atmos and the flexibility of being able to use it for longer trips. The Stratos will get you by if you just want the minimum for your climbing gear.


FLAG
By RockinOut
From NY, NY
Mar 30, 2011
Gear

Gregory Z20 is a great day pack. Has an X wire frame to keep it off your back with a mesh backing. It has a sleeve for a bladder. The only thing that doesnt fit your criteria are the padded shoulder straps. The shoulder straps on the Gregory Z20 are pretty light and well vented. I use the bag mainly for mountain biking. The waist belt isnt beefy but I`m not carry more than a few pounds of stuff in it. I picked mine up on clearance at REI so I only paid like $25 for it, couldnt pass it up.

www.departmentofgoods.com/gregory-z-20-backpack-1220cu-in?CM>>>


FLAG
By bearbreeder
Mar 30, 2011

consider the fact that most of these "daypacks" mentioned are around or above the 1 kg mark ...

as a comparison thats the weight of my osprey mutant stripped of the top pocket and the foam/plastic insert

in other words you can just get a climbing pack and strip it down for the same weight

if you must get a "daypack" with all the features ...the osprey variant 28 can be stripped down to 800g ... or the dead bird cierzo 25/35 are ~400-600g


FLAG
By Julius Beres
From Boulder, CO
Mar 30, 2011
Rewritten

I have an Osprey Talon 33 I have used for climbing for a few years now. It is sold as a light weight pack, which it is, but at a trade off on durability. I find I can stuff a complete trad rack in the pack with my shoes/harness/helmet and fit the rope under the top flap (or have my partner carry that). I've had mine for a few years, but the bottom of it is now mostly reinforced by duct tape due to numerous cuts. (I have carried it on multi-pitch climbs, and it just isn't made for going through chimneys.)

By contrast, I own a BD Demon Pack. It weighs more, isn't as comfortable, but is much more durable. It is made of tough canvas and so far is as good as new after a year. The single compartment makes it easier to pack, but it does not have the convenience of water bottle pouches.

I also own a few Osprey Atmos packs I use for backpacking. I think the mesh on the back is a big compromise... yes, you get some air on your back, but I find the curve that this introduces in the pack makes it much harder to pack in your climbing gear. Furthermore, if you need to take it up the climb with you, you cannot compress the pack as much (an empty Talon pack takes up almost no room). The Talon has the "Airscape mesh" back panel which does not provide as much ventilation as the Atmos's netting, but I think it is a better bet, since it doesn't force the pack to have that curved shape.

I got my BD pack on a massive discount, and basically only use it for sport climbing. It just isn't comfortable or functional as the Talon (much fewer places to clip something to the outside, more of a pain to carry a coiled rope on the outside, etc.) And even though the bottom of my Talon pack is covered in duct tape, it is still functioning 3 years in, so for $100, that isn't too bad. I will probably replace it with another Talon pack once it finally dies for single day trad/alpine climbing.

I guess I would also consider buying an Osprey Variant, which is made for climbing. It has 4 more liters of room than the Talon, and is more rugged, so it would likely last longer. It does cost substantially more, and weighs almost 3 times as much though.


FLAG
By bearbreeder
Mar 30, 2011

Julius Beres wrote:
I guess I would also consider buying an Osprey Variant, which is made for climbing. It has 4 more liters of room than the Talon, and is more rugged, so it would likely last longer. It does cost substantially more, and weighs almost 3 times as much though.


variant 28 ... 0.96 kg, 0.79kg stripped (their website has an error, check the manual)

variant 37 ... 1.5 kg, 0.96 kg stripped

mutant 38 ... 1.28 kg, 0.95 stripped

talon 22 ... 0.81 kg

talon 33 ... 0.92 kg

talon 44 ... 1.18 kg

z 20 ... 1.1 kg

z 30 ... 1.2 kg

as you can see ... using a climbing pack stripped of the top pocket and the frame will give you a good daypack thats very durable, and has all the climbing features you want

im sure cilogear, CCW, WT etc packs have similar weights stripped


FLAG
By Nathan Stokes
Mar 30, 2011

I went with a Gregory z55 because the over curved Osprey didn't even want to pack nicely playing with it in the store. I use the z55 for everything but cragging. I also have a Gregory Alpinista for cragging / winter mountaineering. The Alpinista has taken a serious licking the last 2 years and is still ticking.
I used to carry a smaller LL Bean day pack but I found that the z55 rides better, and i just cinch everything down tight if I'm summer day hiking and don't have much to carry. The z55 will also haul enough stuff for a long weekend (or a week of hut tripping).


FLAG
By drpw
Mar 30, 2011

REI Pinnacle 40. Best pack ever, I just wish they would come out with a 65 version for denali.


FLAG
By Julius Beres
From Boulder, CO
Mar 31, 2011
Rewritten

Rich Schreckengost wrote:
Um...why is everyone suggesting a 40L for a day pack? Look at the BD RPM. The website says it's unavailable but you can find it online. www.blackdiamondequipment.com/en-us/shop/web-specials/rpm-20>>> EDIT: Shit, didn't see that you wanted that whole "Osprey" back panel thing.


Am I missing something? How does one comfortably put the rope on the outside of most Black Diamond packs? I like having the top flap to secure the rope underneath. Many BD climbing packs have no such strap and little on the top or sides to secure the rope.


FLAG
By Miguel75
Apr 3, 2011

I quite like my BD Demon pack. It's a great size and carries well. It has a hydration sleeve and huge opening which makes it easy to just stuff gear into. I can fit a 60 mtr rope, mid sized rack, 3ltrs of water and other odds and ends pretty easily...


FLAG
By Joe Cappiello
Apr 3, 2011

I really like my BD RPM. Picked it up a few weeks ago...it carries well and compresses down to nothing when empty to climb with.


FLAG


Follow replies to this topic? Notify me at the top of web site.
1

Email me.
Page 1 of 1.