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By Bstoker2
May 14, 2013
Me
At what point did you consider yourself not a beginner anymore? Was it when you led a certain 5.#?? Was it when you took a big fall? When did you find yourself finally being out of the world of beginner climbers?


Thanks

FLAG
By Finn the Human
From The Land of Ooo
May 14, 2013
Mathematical!
When I no longer had the desire to compare grades with others.

FLAG
By Benjamin Chapman
From Small Town, USA
May 14, 2013
old 1/4" bolt.
When you feel proficient enough or have the skills to get yourself out whatever situation you might get yourself into. As the saying goes....judgement comes from experience and experience comes from bad judgement. You'll know and be confident that you can handle whatever situation you get into.

FLAG
By Nielsonru
May 14, 2013
I agree with the previous idea of not being scared. I still assess my situation and try to use good judgment, but I feel like I have transitioned out of worrying about things I really don't need to worry about and can just concentrate on climbing.

FLAG
By John Wilder
From Las Vegas, NV
May 14, 2013
When I hit 1,000 pitches. That's when I realized that I really didnt know anything, so I should be a lot more careful.

FLAG
By Jason Kim
From San Diego, CA
May 14, 2013
Descending Cox Col (Bear Creek Spire). Photo by Ryan Slaybaugh. <br />
I apologize for the thread drift, but keeping with the general theme...

Most of you have probably heard of Malcolm Gladwell's "10,000 hours" rule. Let's switch it up to total pitches of climbing. More specifically, I'm referring to traditional climbing, not sport or bouldering.

How many total pitches to reach:

- Gumby beginner
- Beginner with just enough knowledge to get oneself killed
- Rock climber
- Experienced rock climber
- Veteran rock climber
- Genuine hardman

FLAG
By Ben Beckerich
From saint helens, oregon
May 15, 2013
About half way up the East Arete on Illumination Rock
"Hardman" is a character type, not an experience level

To answer the question... It just doesn't work like that. You'll never hit some point in your career where you're like "woah.. I think that was it... yep, it was that last pitch. I'm no longer a 'beginner.'"

It's a retrospective thing. Sometime, probably 2-5 years from now, when you're mentoring some other new climber, you might think to yourself, "wow, where's all the time gone? I remember when I was just a noob myself, and didn't know shit. Now I'm showing someone else how to safely place protection. Guess I'm not just a dumb gumby anymore!"

Don't look for it.. just climb.

FLAG
By Greg D
From Here
May 15, 2013
Out of the blue.  Photo by Mike W. <br />
If you are still asking questions like this, then you know where you stand.

FLAG
 
By Bstoker2
May 16, 2013
Me
Greg D wrote:
If you are still asking questions like this, then you know where you stand.


For the record I do not consider myself a beginner! It was just a convorsation peice! Please respond if you have only constructive advice to share please!


Thank you!

FLAG
By Bstoker2
May 16, 2013
Me
Benjamin Chapman wrote:
When you feel proficient enough or have the skills to get yourself out whatever situation you might get yourself into. As the saying goes....judgement comes from experience and experience comes from bad judgement. You'll know and be confident that you can handle whatever situation you get into.



Great advice!!

Thank you

FLAG
By Brent Apgar
From Out of the Loop
May 16, 2013
Me and Spearhead
Interesting question: made me think of 2 things. I'm not sure where the transition happened... maybe I've just been climbing long enough that I haven't thought about it in so long it doesn't occur to me anymore.

I've spent the last 17yrs doing all kinds of technical rock climbing and feel like there are certain aspects of the sport (the mental games, training, trying hard, technique) I have a good handle on. And then I've also recently had the opportunity to hang around some amazing guides and realized that there are things I could still learn a lot about, like proficiency on big routes, technical systems and risk management.

One of my favorite quotes about "lifestyle sports" is from Gerry Lopez. He's talking about surfing but I still think it holds true for many different pursuits. "The first 10 years is just to see if you like it. The journey doesn't really begin until the next 10."

FLAG
By Eric Engberg
May 20, 2013
When I realized that there wasn't really any such thing as a "pro" climber

FLAG
By Christiney
From Wheat Ridge, CO
May 20, 2013
Horseman
I consider myself a beginner, or not-a-beginner depending who I am standing next to.

When I am next to a person who I am teaching how to toprope belay, I don't seem like a beginner. I also don't seem like a beginner next to someone who only topropes, only climbs indoors, climbs super easy indoor jugs, or just started last week.... even someone who has climbed on and off for 10 years but climbs like 2x before hibernating for years.

When I am next to a person who either climbs at a higher level, has been plugging pro for years, knows self-rescue forwards and backwards, and has climbed in many areas, or for many years, then I seem like a beginner.

Years climbing/climbing ability/experience level/knowledge/areas/types.... just depends on the relative factor of the person i'm standing next to!

FLAG
By JacobD
From Flagstaff, AZ
May 20, 2013
Me on Half Dome Boulder, Middle Finger of Fury <br /> <br />Awesome problem!
John Wilder wrote:
When I hit 1,000 pitches. That's when I realized that I really didnt know anything, so I should be alot more careful.


Awesome comment! I couldn't agree more!

FLAG
By grampa potate
May 20, 2013
when I could climb an offwidth without crapping my pants.

FLAG
By Greg D
From Here
May 21, 2013
Out of the blue.  Photo by Mike W. <br />
Bstoker2 wrote:
At what point did you consider yourself not a beginner anymore? Thanks



When i was man enough to accept any answer, positive or negative when i posed a question on the world wide Web.

FLAG
 
By Bstoker2
May 21, 2013
Me
Greg D wrote:
When i was man enough to accept any answer, positive or negative when i posed a question on the world wide Web.



Just looking for useful advice and not people waisting space on a forum.. That's all!!

FLAG
By Dr. Rocktopolus
From Chattanooga, TN
May 21, 2013
Whipping on the redpoint crux of " The Theater Of Pain " 5.13b Cooks Wall, NC
When you realize that grade, status, and sending is all relative and its all about enjoying yourself... Climb things that inspire you!

FLAG
By Greg Halliday
From Spanish Fork, UT
May 31, 2013
Medical students are named according to what year they are in school. i.e M1, M2, M3, or M4. When I was at the University of Iowa, we had an awesome, hugely experienced, very knowledgeable, MD instructor who would address himself as an M23. I think that this perspective that one is always learning and growing and will never really be "there" is excellent.

FLAG
By Bill M
From Fort Collins, CO
May 31, 2013
"When I hit 1,000 pitches. That's when I realized that I really didnt know anything, so I should be a lot more careful."

A lot truth to that!

FLAG
By Scott O
From California
Jun 1, 2013
Batman Pinnacle
Benjamin Chapman wrote:
When you feel proficient enough or have the skills to get yourself out whatever situation you might get yourself into. As the saying goes....judgement comes from experience and experience comes from bad judgement. You'll know and be confident that you can handle whatever situation you get into.



This is the most important thing.

FLAG
By david doucette
Jun 3, 2013
Top of Intersection Rock, Joshua Tree NP.
when my anchoring skills became solid and second hand nature and i could look at a spot and visually see how i was going to build an anchor in a matter of a minute or two, oftentimes less. mastering anchor building skills is a confidence booster and just plain smart.

FLAG
By Merlin
From Grand Junction
Jun 3, 2013
Greg D wrote:
When i was man enough to accept any answer, positive or negative when i posed a question on the world wide Web.


Stop hurting his feelings, the younger generation is quite sensitive.

FLAG
By Don Ferris
From Eldorado Springs
Jun 4, 2013
Crux of ignominy
While I'm no pro, I'd say you transition from a beginner to pro when you start getting paid to climb whether you're an athelete or a guide.

If it's a question of experience then I would think after a certain amount of exposure to the climbing world you eventually reach another level. When a climber no longer has to think about what to do and relys on instinct to get them through an ordeal is when that level is reached. I've been climbing pretty solidly for 3 years and don't feel like a beginner but there are times when I look at routes and think to myself, "there is no way I could make it up that." I've read through Freedom of the Hills more than a few times and feel like I know my stuff but in reality when the shit hits the fan I won't have the confidence until after I've made it back.

FLAG
 
By Greg D
From Here
Jun 4, 2013
Out of the blue.  Photo by Mike W. <br />
Merlin wrote:
Stop hurting his feelings, the younger generation is quite sensitive.


Sad but true. They are making the SNAGS of the nineties (sensitive new age guys) look like badasses.

FLAG
By Boots Ylectric
From Roselle IL
Jun 7, 2013
Tebow Climbs.  Bet you didn't know that.
Never stop learning.

This applies to climbing.

FLAG


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