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Mt. Goode
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North Buttress T 
North Buttress Variation. T 
South East Slope 
West Ridge of Mt Goode T 

North Buttress 

YDS: 5.9 French: 5c Ewbanks: 17 UIAA: VI ZA: 17 British: HVS 5a

   
Type:  Trad, Alpine, 9 pitches, 800', Grade III
Consensus:  YDS: 5.9 French: 5c Ewbanks: 17 UIAA: VI ZA: 17 British: HVS 5a [details]
FA: John Fisher, Dennis Hennek, Jay Jensen, and T.M. Herbert - 1974
Season: Summer
Page Views: 4,495
Submitted By: Adam Kimmerly on Mar 13, 2006

You & This Route  |  Other Opinions (21)
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BETA PHOTO: A topo of our route up the East Buttress of Mt Goo...

Description 

8-9 pitches in most guidebooks, this route can be done fairly easily in 7 pitches with a 60m rope. Here's how the pitches break down to do it in 7 pitches.

Approach the base of the climb, and scramble up and left on the 4th-class slab to a good ledge below an obvious corner system with a thin-hands crack on the right wall. Rope up there.

P1: 190' (5.8) Climb the open book with the thin-hands crack to a ledge, then up another open book with a fist crack in the corner.

P2: 185' (5.9) Traverse left across the face, looking for an old piton. Sparse gear protects the traverse, with the crux move of the pitch dropping down across the chimney. Cross the chimney and climb the face to the left (small pro).

P3: 70' Climb up loose, easy 5th class to the base of the steep corner.

P4: 185' (5.9) Head straight up the corner stemming and jamming in the finger cracks, then climb the hand crack/chimney above.

P5: 190' Easy 5th class up the ridge. Communication is difficult.

P6: 80' (5.7) Climb up and right to a 5.7 hand crack to a tight tunnel through to the South. Belay on ledge.

P7: 110' (5.8) Climb the short OW straight up the ridge and follow the ridge to the 5.8 mantel onto the summit block. Easy to bail out left from the start of this pitch.

Many bail slings exist on the route ranging in quality. Bring your own bail slings if the weather looks suspicious. DO NOT bail into the gully to the south as it is a bowling alley of rockfall. Rap directly down the route.

Location 

Once on top, the easiest descent is obvious - the talus slope to the South-East leading to scree slopes that drop you right next to Bishop Lake. Don't leave anything at the base of the route because the descent does not take you back to that location.

Protection 

1 set of nuts, small cams (set of TCUs recommended), a few mid-sized cams to #3 Camalot, and a few hexes.

More Photos
Can be found here - thanks Murf.


Photos of North Buttress Slideshow Add Photo
This might upset some people that think CA granite is clean. This route is a pile in most places. This topo does a really good, and funny, job of describing the route if you live in reality.
This might upset some people that think CA granite...
A reflection of the North Buttress, Mt Goode in Margaret Lake
A reflection of the North Buttress, Mt Goode in Ma...
Approaching the route.
Approaching the route.
Sept. 29, 2009
Sept. 29, 2009
Mike leading up what was the crux for me (p4 of Adam's topo photo)-- but very well protected by those vertical cracks. Nuts for all.
BETA PHOTO: Mike leading up what was the crux for me (p4 of Ad...
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Tracy McDermott near the end of the last pitch.
Tracy McDermott near the end of the last pitch.
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Beginning of last pitch
Beginning of last pitch
Rob Beno leading the 5.9 traverse (P2)
Rob Beno leading the 5.9 traverse (P2)
Looking down on the last pitch
Looking down on the last pitch
Dan Rampe moving east - 7/8/13
Dan Rampe moving east - 7/8/13

Comments on North Buttress Add Comment
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Comments displayed oldest to newestSkip Ahead to the Most Recent Dated Sep 8, 2014
By climberz
Jul 30, 2007

Had a hard time finding the official start. The one we did felt 5.10. It was harder than any other pitch on the climb. Great sand descent. Very fun running down little sand chutes. The easiest descent I've done in the Sierras. Goode route to do in a day.
By David Shiembob
From: slc, ut
Aug 7, 2007

Did this route on 8/4, it's really good. On the traverse pitch, we went straight up after climbing around the first arete. This puts you at the bottom of the loose third class. Kind of a grunt with a .9+/.10- OW crux. We climbed out onto the talus covered ledge near the bottom of the 2nd to last pitch and got off-route again. This time we were rewarded with a fantastic zig-zag crack that goes up the clean face left of a pillar and right of a nasty looking OW splitter, right off the middle of the big ledge. Pull some overhanging .10 jug/crack moves to gain the crack/ramp directly or climb up the side of the lefthand pillar and step over to the ramp. Very fun diagonalling crack moves ensue, awkward but very fun at .9+ probably.
By markguycan
From: flagstaff, AZ
Jun 3, 2009

did a version in 1996 w/ Lane Taglio. missed the 4th class approach pitch and went straight up a dihedral from a pretty good bergschrund (below start of traverse)-this was the crux pitch. Had lunch on a sweet ledge in the sun above the (not too) ugly chimney. then on pitch 6 we climbed a nice hand crack hidden behind a huge flake, this took us to a final short blocky pitch and the summit. I remember sleeping the night before at Saddlebag lake and the mosquitos were horrible!
By Alan Nilsson
Feb 13, 2010

Helmet, helmet, helmet. I think even for an alpine route, this climb is fairly loose.

Well worth the effort though
By fossana
From: Bishop, CA
Jun 28, 2010

People complain about the loose rock on Temple but this route was worse. Beautiful formation and great views but a ton of choss.
By x15x15
Jul 26, 2010

Hmmm, canít disagree more with Fossana! This route has choss, but itís a freakín mountain. It also has some great climbing, but it is a mountain. And a comparison to Temple is silly.

Overall, this route rocks, even if it is just a short climb. Remember, this is a mountain, so treat accordingly...
By fossana
From: Bishop, CA
Feb 24, 2011

I have quite a bit of experience on High Sierra routes and am not one to bitch unnecessarily about loose rock on alpine routes. That being said, unlike many other Sierra routes, there are sections on this route where it's difficult to avoid loose rocks (e.g. the chimney pitch and the loose blocks piled on top of snow-covered scree/sand pile on P2). I have soloed routes on Temple but wouldn't consider it on Goode.
By Richard Shore
Sep 20, 2011

A great adventure, and not quite the loose rock horror-show others are making it out to be. There are only a few sections where the choss is unavoidable (per the topo above) - the notch belay at the top of P3, and the belay at the top P4. Atop P4 you are basically standing on a pile of sand with loose blocks. Set a directional to one side to keep the rope from knocking blocks down on your follower.

Lightweight crampons or a small axe/adze for chopping steps in the hard ice on the final approach to the base of the route are nice in late season. The fixed pin that protects the crux traverse on P2 looked solid.
By Jonathan Howland
Jul 12, 2013

1. Of the topos/beta in circulation, MP is most reliable. 6 pitches w/ 60 m. rope.
2. Don't do this route with anyone above you. Even the most careful/alert climber is apt to dislodge material of size.
3. Stay alert on the traverse; the fixed pin (on the second of the two faces) marks the point at which you turn this second arete to gain the chimney and face.
By PumpkinEater
From: Sacramento
Jul 21, 2014

Great Sierra climb. Loose enough to make climbing below another party a bad idea but not "a ton of choss" by any means.
By mpech
Sep 8, 2014

didn't feel that chossy or loose/dangerous.
great climb with a moderate approach and descent.
Summit register suggests that a lot of new routing is going on in the area.