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Mammut Matterhorn rope?
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By Chris Cavallaro
Mar 11, 2009

Does anyone have the Mammut Matterhorn? 10.2 X 60 dry rope

I'm primarily a sport climber and would like people's opinions on this rope. I'm looking at using the REI dividend.

www.mammut.ch/en/productDetail/1011154_v_1/Matterhorn+10.2+m>>>


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By Tradster
From Phoenix, AZ
Mar 11, 2009

Chris Cavallaro wrote:
Does anyone have the Mammut Matterhorn? 10.2 X 60 dry rope I'm primarily a sport climber and would like people's opinions on this rope. I'm looking at using the REI dividend. www.mammut.ch/en/productDetail/1011154_v_1/Matterhorn+10.2+m>>>


The Mammut Super Safe 10.2x60 will go over a .75 edge. Pricy but a really durable and nice handling cord. Rated for 11-13 falls, so you can work a project, if that's your bag.


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By James Otey
From NH
Mar 11, 2009
Urban Surfer, Rumney. <br /> <br />Photo by Lee Hansche

My friend has one. Supple and handles very well. Pricey, but worth it I think.


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By John Fodor
From Bolder, Co
Mar 11, 2009

Chris,

I'm a big fan of Mammut ropes. I have never had any problems with um. They always handle nice and provide soft catches. They are my top choice for a rope.


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By Chris Cavallaro
Mar 11, 2009

The one thing that bothers me is the UIAA falls rating is 7. I see more ropes are higher than that.

Humor me; What does that really break down to? Does having a low rated UIAA falls rope translate to lower longevity?


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By Tradsplatter
From Boulder, CO
Mar 11, 2009

I purchased a Matterhorn rope on sale last year for use as my main sport and trad single rope. I found it to be relatively durable under moderate to heavy use and it handled well. I have an ATC Guide and the Matterhorn slides into the somewhat narrow openings without too much trouble for a 10mm rope. Not a sexy rope but a solid, practical purchase.


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By John Fodor
From Bolder, Co
Mar 11, 2009

Chris Cavallaro wrote:
The one thing that bothers me is the UIAA falls rating is 7. I see more ropes are higher than that. Humor me; What does that really break down to? Does having a low rated UIAA falls rope translate to lower longevity?


This rating is commonly misunderstood. The current UIAA minimum required fall rating standard is 5 falls. Without going into too much detail, the reason for the confusion is that a UIAA fall is a factor 1.78 static belay fall with the rope going over a simulated 10mm carabiner edge. This is an extremely severe fall and almost never occurs on the cliff. It certainly never occurs ten or more times in a row on the same 8 foot length of rope, but this is exactly what manufacturers subject their ropes to in determining this statistic. When the UIAA test lab tests the rope, they do not stop after the 5 minimum "required" falls. They will continue to do "drops" until the rope fails, and they then report the number of falls that the rope withstood to the manufacturer. Ropes may be cut, but they do not break under normal climbing conditions. Climbers should try not to fixate on this fall rating statistic too much.

Another point which may not be quite as readily obvious, but which can be extrapolated from fall rating information, is the fact that ropes with higher fall ratings maintain their low impact force for a longer period of time. A high fall rating is most useful in giving a climber an idea of how much energy absorbing capacity there is in a rope. The impact force listed on a rope's hangtag is only a measure of the potential force that could be exerted on the leader in the first severe fall. Subsequent falls on the rope result in successively higher impact forces. The longer a rope keeps absorbing energy, the safer and softer the falls will be, and the easier it is for the belayers to do their job. A rope can fail its function without breaking by simply transmitting excessive force to the rest of the system. So, while an initially low impact force rope is super, having a rope that also has a high fall rating means that you're going to retain that low impact safety margin and soft catch on your system for much longer.


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By Chris Cavallaro
Mar 11, 2009

Awesome John. Thanks!
Regarding impact force. Once again, this rope does not fare as good as other as it is 9.2, and a few I'm looking at are more expensive and have UIAA falls of 11-12 and impact force under 8.
But, once again, I am trying to not let that persuade me too as I believe a soft catch is done so by the belay(er) with minimal correlation to the ropes rated impact force. U dig?


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By John Fodor
From Bolder, Co
Mar 11, 2009

Chris,

If you believe a soft catch is given by the belayer then the impact force rating doesnít really apply? Right?

So, I have never retired a rope because it had held to many falls or was too static, mostly itís the condition of the rope. Core shot, flat spots in the core, cut by stone fall, etcÖ Ok, one time because I took a big fall 80+ft on it, but the rope was also pretty used to being with.

Also, keep in mind you donít fall on both ends of the rope at the same time. So when one end wears out, start using the other end.

So, I suggest if you like the rope, get it and enjoy it! I have a Matterhorn and love it!

Cheers,
John


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By John McNamee
Administrator
From Littleton, CO
Mar 11, 2009
Artist Tears P3

One of my favourite ropes.

It handles very well and nice to climb with.


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