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Late For Supper 

YDS: 5.12 French: 7b+ Ewbanks: 27 UIAA: VIII+ British: E6 6b

   
Type:  TR, 1 pitch, 60'
Consensus:  YDS: 5.12b French: 7b Ewbanks: 26 UIAA: VIII+ British: E5 6b [details]
FA: Norm Schenk ?
Page Views: 1,014
Submitted By: Morgan Patterson on Jun 14, 2011
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Description 

Climb straight up and right from center of overhanging buldge. Start on tiny crimpers to undercling, then up through some good holds, then move out up and right on small holds to a big move to a horizontal, Pull lip above horizontal to easy slab climbing to anchors.


Location 

Starts on two small crimpers in the middle of the buldge.


Protection 

Top rope - This line used to have a bolt to protect a ground fall but it was chopped.



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By Will Starks
Jul 29, 2011
rating: 5.12a/b 7b 26 VIII+ E5 6a

Morgan, when did Matt Wilder climb this route? I am not sure who the first ascensionist is, but I know that it was repeated in 1991 and already had a name, Late For Supper. It was considered 5.11+/5.12- at the time.

By Morgan Patterson
Administrator
Aug 21, 2011

I've updated the info... thnx. I was given second hand info and was told Matt had worked it out a number of years ago when he was working the V12/13 on the main roof at Samp Mortar. I was also told going straight up on the crimps and out right was in the 13 range with the move from crimps to undercling going somewhere in the V7 range (From my experience that seemed pretty accurate def harder then V5). The info was not accurate so thank you for the correction.

By Will Starks
Oct 10, 2011
rating: 5.12a/b 7b 26 VIII+ E5 6a

Sent it last week, and climbed it two more times that day to see how I felt about its true difficulty. Really nice climbing after the hard start; I was surprised at how enjoyable a route it is. I don't boulder so I can't comment on the difficulty of the start on that scale, but I definitely recommend trying this route with a static rope (to avoid hitting the rocks below when attempting the opening moves).

By JJJameson
Apr 6, 2012

I climbed this in the '89- '91 era, it had indeed already been climbed and named, it was a guy named Norman, or Norm who had done it (that I know of for sure), along with a partner who I think was named Chris (Pappas?). There may have been others of course, but I know of these guys for sure, as we exchanged war stories about it. Use of a static line is a good idea for sure, at the very minimum you should pre-load a dynamic rope to get some of the stretch out. You can - and will- hit the ground and big rock at the base if you pop from anything below a solid stance at the undercling.

By scott rourke
Sep 3, 2012

Someone once told me in the early eighties that this was put up by Norm Schenk (not sure about the last name spelling).

By andyelliott
Nov 13, 2013

why isnt this line sport bolted? if its only a top rope route (which i think everybody can agree is fucking lame) than why not bolt it? wouldnt that be more fun? I think it seems logical, but am i talking crazy here? why not bolt any of the routes at the "great" ledge that cant hold gear?

By Morgan Patterson
Administrator
Nov 13, 2013

Because there's a dad and his son, Will Starks liekly knows them and was likely involved in the event, who will visit the cliff and hammer over and destroy any bolts put in the cliff regardless if it was put in on lead on an FA or done on rappel. Anchors were placed in an effort to reduce impacts from climbers on the cliff top as well as to encourage leading rather then TR'ing and the dad and son smashed all the anchor bolts over and left the mangled metal in the cliffs. I removed the mangled metal and around that time I also learned that the son frequents the cliff and was braggin about it. I was told they didn't seem much like climbers. SAD.