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Jul 20, 2012
Just bought a new rope (Mammut 10.0 supernova) and am now realizing that I wish I'd spent an extra $50 to get a treated rope. I'm living in Colorado and we see afternoon showers almost daily. It's just a huge pain to have to lower and pull the rope until it stops raining and the rock is dry.

Is there anywhere that I can get my rope dry treated after it has already been manufactured? Also, as long as I let the rope dry, it's fine for it to get wet, correct?
JeffL
From Salt Lake City
Joined Jun 14, 2012
14 points
Jul 20, 2012
All my ropes are dry treated and when they get dragged through a puddle or get rained on, they get all wet too. It's not a miracle treatment, it wares off and is nice to have but not a must, especially for cragging. And it's fine for it to get wet and let it dry and climb. They loose some strength when wet but it's only temporary. Ropes are super strong, even if they are wet while your still climbing. Have fun!
Darby
From Snoqualmie, wa
Joined Feb 17, 2010
0 points
Jul 20, 2012
Thanks Hank Caylor!
My mammut rope has dry treatment, but last time when we wear out ice climbing, the sheath got wet and frozen as well.

So I guess as long as you don't use it in sub freezing tempt, you should be fine with non-dry-treated rope
Bang
From Charlottesville, VA
Joined Dec 12, 2010
43 points
Jul 20, 2012
Awesome slab climb right out of the water! Rogers ...
There is a manufacturer that sells a after-market dry rope treatment that can be purchased and the rope dipped into this solution to dr treat it. I can't recall who was selling it.

I never buy dry ropes as my old ice climbing guide/teacher once told us that it was a waste of money - as it didn't last long and after you wash your rope a few times it was gone anyway. True? I dunno...but I never have purchased any dry ropes and havne't any any big issues with my ropes freexing up when wet ice climbing as well.

???
NYClimber
From New York
Joined Jul 17, 2011
180 points
Administrator
Jul 20, 2012
Me and the offspring walking back to the car after...
I don't think the dry treatment is so that you can climb rock in the rain. Jake Jones
From Richmond, VA
Joined Jul 30, 2011
1,005 points
Jul 20, 2012
if you use the rope for rock as well it wont last very long ...

i have dry treated ropes, and i save em for better things than normal rock climbing ...

if you are leaving the rope up, it means yr likely TRing ... and dry treatement on a TR rope is a total waste of moola ...
bearbreeder
Joined Mar 1, 2009
1,941 points
Jul 20, 2012
Middle
I like the way dry treated ropes handle and I find them to be more durable. Ray Pinpillage
From West Egg
Joined Jul 23, 2010
130 points
Administrator
Jul 20, 2012
Once we landed we headed to Font to find a place t...
First off, most ropes these days have a dry treated core, even the so called standard ropes. So you might want to check that.

Michael Urban wrote:
There is a manufacturer that sells a after-market dry rope treatment that can be purchased and the rope dipped into this solution to dr treat it. I can't recall who was selling it. I never buy dry ropes as my old ice climbing guide/teacher once told us that it was a waste of money - as it didn't last long and after you wash your rope a few times it was gone anyway. True? I dunno...but I never have purchased any dry ropes and havne't any any big issues with my ropes freexing up when wet ice climbing as well. ???


I believe that Sterling is the company that sells the dry treatment. Though Nikwax may make one as well.

The dry treatment on a rope is somewhat like a teflon coating so they do tend to handle a bit better. I could see the coating wearing off the outside of the sheath after awhile but not so much the inside. I have never washed a rope so I don't know about it washing out, though I think the treatment when done by the manufacture is heat set in so I'm not sure that an acceptable wash for a rope would strip it.
LeeAB
From ABQ, NM
Joined Aug 3, 2008
10,131 points
Administrator
Jul 20, 2012
JeffL wrote:
Just bought a new rope (Mammut 10.0 supernova) and am now realizing that I wish I'd spent an extra $50 to get a treated rope. I'm living in Colorado and we see afternoon showers almost daily. It's just a huge pain to have to lower and pull the rope until it stops raining and the rock is dry. Is there anywhere that I can get my rope dry treated after it has already been manufactured? Also, as long as I let the rope dry, it's fine for it to get wet, correct?

As others have said, the dry treatment is of limited use. Even the best dry treatments can wear off in under 100 pitches. I have had top of the line dry treatments from industry leading rope manufacturers wear off with two weeks of frequent climbing. Also, dry treatments are not water proof, they are water resistant. If you get caught in a heavy rain storm for awhile, your dry-treated rope will soak in some water, even if it is brand new.
20 kN
From Hawaii
Joined Feb 2, 2009
665 points
Jul 21, 2012
Getting up the Great Dihedral on Hallet Peak, RMNP...
Rope dry treatments wear off at different rates depending on the type of treatment the rope has, as there are two or three types of treatments. There are two single style treatments, one that treats the sheath and one that treats the core. Then there are double treatments which treat both.

Obviously, sheath treatments wear off. Core treatments, not so much. Washing your rope with Nikwax TechWash and then treating it with Rope Proof works flawlessly. I ice climbed and rock climbed on the same 2x dry rope (New England Maxim Glider) for four years with practically zero water absorption/freezing. This was after washing it at least once a year in Tech Wash, and using the Rope Proof in the middle year. I would constantly get comments on how nice my "new" rope looked...even after four years.

As someone stated earlier, core treatments give the core strands a non-stick style finish that increases the core's abrasion resistance. This can go a long way in prolonging the life of your rope, as dirt and sand tend to pass through the core instead of lodging in it.

Also, the biggest danger that no one is really addressing is that when your rope absorbs water it dramatically increases it's elongation properties. The more elongated the rope, the easier it is to cut under tension. The easier it is to cut under tension...well, see the infamous butterknife video from Black Diamond. In the real world, replace that butter knife with a rather sharp edge and take a whip over it (e.g. the Yellow Spur accident last year).

Send your inquiry to a reputable rope manufacturer and they will explain the material science of it all. It's quite interesting stuff, and definitely not as much of a "profitable" gimmick as you might think.
Tony T.
From Denver, CO
Joined Jul 29, 2009
46 points
Jul 21, 2012
theuiaa.org/upload_area/files/...


7. Claims abound about the benefits of dry coating of ropes (durably waterproof, improved
handling, abrasion resistance and durability, etc.). First of all, there are no standard procedures.
Manufacturers can do as much or as little as they feel like. Furthermore, there are no tests
specifically for climbing ropes, which measure durability, abrasion resistance or waterproofing. No
valid comparisons can, therefore, be made. However, there is no doubt treatments and finishing
processes are known, which reduce water absorption. The aging behaviour of this treatment is
supposedly good over the rope's lifetime, but it is also accepted that the dry proofing deteriorates
with rope use. A study of dry proofed ropes from thirteen different manufacturers, using a variety of
test methods, shows that only a very few ropes do indeed repel water well. The rest are bunched
together with much higher absorption rates. One may say that many of the claims hold no water,
but the ropes do.


who knows ... maybe things have improved ...

the years that a rope looks new is pretty irrelevant ... its the number of pitches or vertical gain it has seen and the type of climbing ... a person who climbs 200+ days a year at an average of 10 pitches a day will wear out a rope much faster than someone who climbs weekends ... conversely someone top roping on their rope will wear out a rope much faster than someone doing alpine/ice
bearbreeder
Joined Mar 1, 2009
1,941 points
Administrator
Jul 21, 2012
Tony T. wrote:
2x dry rope (New England Maxim Glider) for four years with practically zero water absorption/freezing.

I have a number of the exact same ropes. I own a 10.5, a 9.9 and two 9.5's. The longest the dry treatment lasted on those ropes was about two months. But judging by your profile picture, I am guessing we use our ropes for different applications. I take whippers on my ropes religiously, so that may very well have an effect on the treatment's lifespan.
20 kN
From Hawaii
Joined Feb 2, 2009
665 points
Jul 21, 2012
nikwax.com/en-gb/products/prod... Moof
From Portland, OR
Joined Dec 11, 2007
11 points
Jul 21, 2012
Obi Wan Ryobi - Darth Vader Crag, Rumney NH
Michael Urban wrote:
but I never have purchased any dry ropes and havne't any any big issues with my ropes freexing up when wet ice climbing as well. ???


You don't climb in the NorthEast do you? Even when it's -10F there is running water on parts of most routes. Ropes freeze very easily, belaying becomes a bitch.
Brendan Blanchard
From Boulder, CO
Joined Oct 18, 2010
309 points
Jul 21, 2012
Awesome slab climb right out of the water! Rogers ...
Brendan Blanchard wrote:
You don't climb in the NorthEast do you? Even when it's -10F there is running water on parts of most routes. Ropes freeze very easily, belaying becomes a bitch.


Yup! I climb in New York State - all over - rock and ice climbing....
NYClimber
From New York
Joined Jul 17, 2011
180 points
Jul 22, 2012
High on the Beckey Route on the Bastille Buttress ...
Tony T. wrote:
The easier it is to cut under tension...well, see the infamous butterknife video from Black Diamond. In the real world, replace that butter knife with a rather sharp edge and take a whip over it (e.g. the Yellow Spur accident last year).


Just curious if you have a link to this video? I couldn't find it with a cursory search on google...
Chris Norwood
From San Diego, CA
Joined Sep 12, 2011
101 points
Administrator
Jul 22, 2012
Tony T. wrote:
well, see the infamous butterknife video from Black Diamond. \

Do you have a link?
20 kN
From Hawaii
Joined Feb 2, 2009
665 points
Jul 28, 2012
Tony T. wrote:
As someone stated earlier, core treatments give the core strands a non-stick style finish that increases the core's abrasion resistance. This can go a long way in prolonging the life of your rope, as dirt and sand tend to pass through the core instead of lodging in it.


That sounds like a load of BS. Core abrasion? Sand passing through the core rather than "lodging" in it??
Gunkiemike
Joined Jul 29, 2009
1,651 points
Jul 29, 2012
Chris Norwood wrote:
Just curious if you have a link to this video? I couldn't find it with a cursory search on google...


Petzl just put out one a few months ago. That will be easier to find.
NorCalNomad
From San Francisco
Joined Oct 6, 2011
116 points
Jul 29, 2012
I can't find any current, endorsed product for treating or re-treating ropes, period. Nikwax appears to have discontinued their product (or it has otherwise become unavailable through major suppliers), and Sterling no longer sells any product intended for treating ropes after purchase.

Seems likely that this is liability-related, but does that mean we are no longer able to restore water repellency - manufacturers just expect us to buy a new rope?
CWood
From SLC, UT
Joined Oct 18, 2009
48 points
Jul 30, 2012
High Exposure
Gunkiemike wrote:
That sounds like a load of BS. Core abrasion? Sand passing through the core rather than "lodging" in it??


I agree, Gunkiemike. And, even though I wash my ropes from time to time, I suspect the idea that particles get inside and abrade the core is a bunch of crap.

As evidence, take a look at some of the photos on this site: Caveworthy: Pressure Washing Rope
"None of the samples showed any signs of dirt, mud, silt or any other foreign substance inside the rope. Nothing had made it past the sheath after the pressure washing or even after 17 years of caving."

One of those photos shows the core of an unwashed, mud caked rope and it looks bright and clean inside.

I wash my rope because I don't like the dirt/aluminum oxide on the outside. Not because I'm worried about core abrasion.
wivanoff
Joined Mar 3, 2012
121 points
Aug 5, 2012
So what's the verdict? No more rope treatment available? We're just fucked after the manufacturer's treatment wears off? CWood
From SLC, UT
Joined Oct 18, 2009
48 points


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