Route Guide - iPhone / Android - Partners - Forum - Photos - Deals - What's New - School of Rock
Login with Facebook
 ADVANCED
Himalaya Advice
View Latest Posts in This Forum or All Forums
   Page 1 of 1.  
Follow replies to this topic? Notify me at the top of web site.
1

Email me.
 
By Ed Rhine
Dec 9, 2008

Hello everyone . . . I am looking at heading to the Himalayas with a friend in the Spring of 2010. We have never been there before, but have varied climbing and mountain experience. I am looking for advice on a couple of areas. First off: a good resource for examining peaks and established routes on them. Second would be any general tips about traveling in the area and setting up a private expedition there. Third: are there any pieces of gear (outside of the norm) that you found invaluable or wish you had when you where there.

Also what good/bad experiences have you had with different services providing support for trekking with animals to carry gear?

Right now we are looking at Pumori, but would like more resources to find different options.

Thanks for any advice!!!


FLAG
By Dave Pilot
From Boulder, CO
Dec 9, 2008
Jack Ripper

www.alpine-club.org.uk/hi/index.htm

I've had good luck with Wilderness Experience for trekking peaks. Not so much experience with using guides on larger peaks as we prefer to do most of the climbing ourselves.

I've heard Pumori has become unsafe lately due to large avalanches but I'm certainly no authority. You might want to consider doing trekking peaks only on your first visit and call it a reconnaissance trip. Doing a big peak right out of the gate when you haven't been in the area might be tough, unless you go fully guided which has pros and cons.

As far as essential gear, good books, iPod Nano or Shuffle, wet wipes. If you want a comprehensive list of gear, I can send you one that I've used in the past, but it changes based on the objective and the style.

Have a ball!


FLAG
By Clyde
Dec 9, 2008

Good coffee beans and an Aeropress. Everything else is optional ;-)

My book, Climbing: Expedition Planning, has a lot more information. Another book of mine, Climbing: Training for Peak Performance, can help you get your body ready. Sorry for the spam.

FYI, Pumori has one of the highest fatality to summit ratios of the popular big peaks.


FLAG
By Ed Rhine
Dec 9, 2008

Dave . . . thanks for the reply. Where did you hear about the avy danger on Pumori? I have been searching a lot on the mountain, but mostly guided trip ads come up.

What do you think would make it difficult to do on the first round? It it just not being in the area before, or the mountain itself, or something else. I have climbed in South America before and my partner in Alaska (also the park and CO mtns) and we were hoping to do something challenging, but fairly realistic in terms of scope and technical difficulty. We are in pretty decent shape already and have a year and half to train

We were also thinking of doing a smaller trekking style peak as a means of acclimatizing. What is your take on that?

Do you have other suggestions for routes/mtns?

I would love anything you have in terms of eqt lists, resources, etc. my email is ed@volohmedia.com

Again . . thanks for the input/advice. We are trying right now to decide for himalayas or Cassin on Denali in order to start planning


FLAG
By Ed Rhine
Dec 9, 2008

No worries for the spam . . . thanks Clyde.

Do you have any idea if the fatality rate is primarily from guided or unguided trips?

We are trying right now to evaluate everything as far as areas and peaks. we want something challenging, but not over our heads.


Any suggestions


FLAG
By Clyde
Dec 9, 2008

Avalanches don't make distinctions. Get in touch with local guide/stud/hero/great guy Fabrizio...he pulled off an amazing rescue on Pumori a month ago.

mbdclimbing.blogspot.com/

Lots of options in the Khumbu for all levels, with plenty of warm-up peaks too. The Sherpa culture is a bonus you won't get anywhere else.


FLAG
By Ed Rhine
Dec 9, 2008

Oddly enough, I just found his blog online about 10 minutes ago and will email him with some questions. I guess over all, I just need to do a lot more research to get things together. Thanks for the replies so far . . . advice and guidance are much appreciated


FLAG
By Dave Pilot
From Boulder, CO
Dec 9, 2008
Jack Ripper

Have you considered Ama Dablam? It's been having its own problems with avalanches in the last few years, but when it's in good shape, it's a great climb. Due to its popularity you can count on fixed lines most of the way. About three and a half years ago, we did a couple trekking peaks to acclimatize (Nirekha and Lobuche) and then did Ama fairly quickly.


FLAG
By Ed Rhine
Dec 9, 2008

We have bounced that around. I have read about the avy danger on there recently. One thing that we are trying to do is climb in alpine style as independently as possible. Neither of us are superstars, but we can pull off WI4 and 5.10+/5.11- trad and have a good background in the mtns. We are planning on spending A LOT of time in the park this and next season and are doing a bunch of backcountry skiing to work on avy awareness and snow reading skill.

I guess the thought of having the fixed lines on Ama is good for the top and especially the descent.

How long did it take you on Ama?

What were the other two peaks like? Fun climbing?

Thanks again for your help!!! Mucho appreciated


FLAG
By GR Johnson
Jan 31, 2010

I was on Pumori in the fall of 2003. We were visited by the families of the spanish team that had died there a few years prior on the SE Ridge. We climbed the SW Ridge/Japanese route to the summit snow fields and found absolutely lethal snow conditons and had to give up our summit bid.

I think Pumori is an amazing mountain. The base camp is in a great spot with beautiful views of everest and nuptse. Good luck! if you have any questions feel free to shoot me a note.


FLAG


Follow replies to this topic? Notify me at the top of web site.
1

Email me.
Page 1 of 1.