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Halloween.
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Halloween TR 

Halloween 

YDS: 5.12c French: 7b+ Ewbanks: 27 UIAA: IX- ZA: 27 British: E6 6b PG13

   
Type:  TR, 25'
Consensus:  YDS: 5.12c French: 7b+ Ewbanks: 27 UIAA: IX- ZA: 27 British: E6 6b [details]
FA: TR - Ed Sewall , 1987
Page Views: 688
Submitted By: M Sprague on Feb 4, 2011

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Ed Sewall 1987 on Halloween

Description 

For a long time this was a RI test piece, the first in the state given the grade of 5.13, though later down graded to stiff 12c, probably after more people got used to bouldering the hard steep stuff. People have thought about trying to boulder it over the years, but the crux is an awkward, low percent dyno and the landing is extremely bad. Even while top roping great care must be taken not to clip the climber's ankles on the blocks below. It hasn't been bolted yet due to the difficulty doing so in a way that would adequately protect while keeping the rope out of the way of the climbing. This is a great problem, well worth the hassle of setting up a TR.

Start under the cave and climb up blocks to gain the tiered roof. Using the left hand in the horizontal by the point, left foot pasted below and a right heel hook/cam, reach out to crimps at the lip with the right hand then the left. The crux move is then dynoing to the high hold out left and sticking it, which will require perfect timing and full body coordination.

-Admin's note -RhodeIslandJeff, I reassigned this to flesh it out some. I hope you don't mind.

Location 

Slightly to right of the middle.

Protection 

Trees and gear at the top for anchors. You will need to use a fair amount of slings or static rope and a couple pieces of gear to act as a directional to keep the anchor from slipping to the side. Make sure your slings are backed up as usual of course, as I have seen one slice completely through here after numerous attempts. Attentive belaying is a must with a wide swing when you miss the lip. Rope stretch puts you pretty close to a rock.


Photos of Halloween Slideshow Add Photo
Route runs just to the right of the tree in the middle of photo.
BETA PHOTO: Route runs just to the right of the tree in the mi...
Ed Sewall 1987 Halloween
Ed Sewall 1987 Halloween

Comments on Halloween Add Comment
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Comments displayed oldest to newestSkip Ahead to the Most Recent Dated Oct 10, 2013
By Ed Sewall
Oct 17, 2011

I did the FA of this route as a toprope in 1987. The piton must have been placed after that as I dont remember any piton there at the time. I did the route on Halloween day, thats where the name came from.
By Alex Johnston
Oct 27, 2011

Ed i went yesterday and attempted Halloween. Its awesome! Im curious about the moves from the underhang around the corner and up, but even without beta ill keep trying. Couldnt get one hand off the horn where the piton is, could get one hand on the first flake underneath. Ive got video of my attempts. I want this climb!
By M Sprague
Administrator
From: New England
Nov 10, 2011

Halloween was Rhody Loadie TR test piece and the first roped climb that Whitey put me on when I was just starting, not long after Ed put it up. Luckily bouldering at Lincoln Woods with better climbers than I gave me the finger strength to get it pretty quickly. Where is there a piton now? I too never remember one before, though there was something like a big old drill bit stuck in a hole near the top that we used to tie of as part of the TR anchor along with regular gear.

Alex, if you are talking about the crux moves around the lip, it has been decades, but I seem to remember you had to work you hands out far then cut your feet and just before they finished swinging to the left you campused up with you left hand. It was a timing thing so your hand would stick. I can't remember exactly what is going on with your left foot; if it pastes quickly over the lip as you dyno or after you catch the hold. After that it is just a few pumpy but much easier moves. (EDIT- reread above post. I seem to remember a heal hook with your right foot while your left was pasted below to get your second hand out, then comes what I described above. Your right hand goes out to the lip first, than reach past it with your left.)

Any thoughts on if I put a couple bolts on it for leading? I have thought about it over the years, but never did. I was always preoccupied with other areas and wasn't sure how most would feel. If I did put them in, I would do it well and camo them. I live about 15 minutes away, so could do it this winter if people wished. Frankly, a few well done bolts would make Mt Tom much more user friendly. I don't think having the place carpeted with them would go over well though.
By Joe M.
Nov 11, 2011

I'm for it, as well as some bolting at Snake Den. I think those routes would be very popular leads.
By Brian
From: North Kingstown, RI
Nov 11, 2011

Somebody put some bolts in at Snake Den and at Pettaquamscutt Rock. They were 1/4 inch bolts in metal sleaves that you get at the local hardware store for concrete anchors. I'm pretty sure they were removed at Snake Den. I know they were removed at Pettaquamscutt. If someone is going to bolt it obviously should be done right, like by one of you two. I have a Bosch and some 3/8 stainless and Fixe hangers that I'd volunteer.
By Brian
From: North Kingstown, RI
Nov 11, 2011

Mark, et al.

I remember the piton on Halloween from at least 15 years ago and it was old and rusty even then. That is why I assumed it was put in by the FA (Ed Sewall). It must have been there even before the FA? Which leads one to ask "who put it there and why"? It is under the roof so it is not for top-rope purposes. The only thing I can see it there for is leading but I doubt anyone was leading 5.12 when ringed pitons were being used.
By M Sprague
Administrator
From: New England
Nov 11, 2011

Thanks, Brian. I would use either 1/2" stainless Rawls or glue-ins. The glue-ins actually blend in better when countersunk and painted to match the rock. Your bolts and hangers might come in handy for another route in the area though that wouldn't take such short hard falls.

That piton could very well be a previously used and rusted one that somebody pounded in for a directional. I'll take a walk over there soon and have a look and see what would make sense and not be too obtrusive.
By Christopher J Simpson
Mar 10, 2013

Mark, I'd be a huge fan of that decision. I'd be happy to go out with you and take a look.

Do we have any info on the land management policies and how this might go over?
By dave wave
Oct 4, 2013

so guys, has it been bolted yet?
By M Sprague
Administrator
From: New England
Oct 7, 2013

Not to my knowledge.
By Dana Seaton
Oct 7, 2013

It seems pretty unnecessary to bolt this line. Its very short, has two moves, and is easily top roped. Not worth the time and money, IMO.
By M Sprague
Administrator
From: New England
Oct 10, 2013

That is the opinion I ended up coming to also, Dana.