Login with Facebook
 ADVANCED
Flemish Bend - Figure 8 Bend to Join Rappel Ropes
View Latest Posts in This Forum or All Forums
   Page 1 of 1.  
Follow replies to this topic? Notify me at the top of web site.
1

Email me.
 
 
Oct 6, 2012
Usually use double fishermans. Used to use EDK. New book suggests Flemish / Figure 8 bend to join rappel ropes. What do you think? Lower profile and easier to untie. I like that. Chris Massey
Joined Oct 1, 2012
16 points
Oct 6, 2012
use an overhand S Denny
From Aspen, CO
Joined Sep 25, 2008
24 points
Oct 6, 2012
+1 for overhand with long tails (easy to tie/untie and less likely to get stuck as you pull). But any of the options you listed will work just fine. BoulderCharles
Joined Sep 22, 2011
23 points
Oct 6, 2012
Bocan
What book was it?

I dunno, seems like reinventing the wheel. A overhand is pretty much as simple as it gets. Easy to tie / untie, flat and simple. I haven't seen the flemmish, but the overhand is tough to beat.
Scott McMahon
From Boulder, CO
Joined Feb 15, 2006
927 points
Oct 6, 2012
Oh! Good!

This will be a worthwhile, congenial thread!
John Husky
Joined May 10, 2011
3 points
Administrator
Oct 6, 2012
NCTRAD wrote:
Usually use double fishermans. Used to use EDK. New book suggests Flemish / Figure 8 bend to join rappel ropes. What do you think? Lower profile and easier to untie. I like that.

Ha, yea, the figure eight bend is not a lower profile than the EDK, not by a long shot. I would like to know what book said it was. But yes, you can use the figure eight if you prefer. But, the EDK is pretty much as low profile as it gets.
20 kN
From Hawaii
Joined Feb 2, 2009
665 points
Oct 6, 2012
I use, and highly recommend, the EDK. But if you do choose to use the figure 8 bend, just make sure you use the in-line version. The off-set version has the same bad habit of an EDK but much worse, and no advantages over the EDK. (P.S. bad thing about EDK is that if not tied tightly, and backed up, it can roll. When it rolls, you get the same knot, but with less tail. If it rolls off the tails, you're done. Off-set fig-8 rolls easier, and eats more tail with each roll.) Robert Cort
Joined Oct 12, 2009
804 points
Oct 6, 2012
Jacob Krenn working his way up the Incredible Hulk...
If I'm not mistaken, a Flemish bend and a properly tied double (or re-traced) figure eight are one and the same. I personally prefer either the Flemish bend or just an overhand know with long tails for double rope rappells. I feel that the Flemish bend is more secure for joining ropes of different diameters, although I have heard that double fishermans are more secure in this circumstance, I feel that creates more of an issue with bending, snagging, or turning in the rope(s). Perhaps it's a matter of personal preference, and maybe an extremely experienced guide or well traveled Alpinist may provide a sounder response. In the meantime, though, I will personally trust the Flemish bend or an overhand with long tails. That's MHO though, please take it with a grain of salt. Jacob Krenn
Joined Aug 11, 2008
98 points
 
Oct 6, 2012
Troll Superclimber
Joined Mar 7, 2009
1,501 points
Oct 6, 2012
Thunderkiss
Chris nails it. Gilroy
From Boulderado
Joined Apr 7, 2008
1,017 points
Oct 7, 2012
Dreamweaver
Tripled bowlines with a trucker hitch finish is the safest. Of course this only works on ropes with thicker than 11.2. Everything else needs a quadruple bowline with a double fucker-nut hitch. Dave Bn
From Fort Collins, CO
Joined Jul 13, 2011
15 points
Oct 7, 2012
I prefer to splice the ropes ala Patrick O'brian John Husky
Joined May 10, 2011
3 points
Oct 7, 2012
alaska
I use a Flemish. agd
Joined Mar 31, 2010
30 points
Oct 7, 2012
Jacob Krenn working his way up the Incredible Hulk...
It's best to just apply the belay knife. Jacob Krenn
Joined Aug 11, 2008
98 points


Follow replies to this topic? Notify me at the top of web site.
1

Email me.
Page 1 of 1.  
Beyond the Guidebook:
The Definitive Climbing Resource
Inspiration & Motivation
to Fuel Your Run
Next Generation Mountain
Bike Trail Maps
Backcountry, Sidecountry
& Secret Stashes
Better Data. Better Tools.
Better Hikes!