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Everest is for teens
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By Woodchuck ATC
May 22, 2010
Rock Wars, RRG, 2008

OK, so the news is today that this 13 yr. old kid just made it to the top of Everest, and is now the youngest to summit. He's headed for a goal of all 7 Summits. Did Kili when he was 9. Isn't he supposed to be at home, popping pimples and playing with his X-Box or Gameboy while texting his friends endlessly? Maybe doing 5.10b gym leads instead of trekking across the world?

So does this really put an end to anyone crying about how hard it is to hike/climb mountains? I mean, does it prove all you need now to summit big mountains are a good pair of legs and lungs?. Or does this event just make us all feel so much older than we need to feel on a hungover Saturday morning.


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By Bryan Carroll
From Los Osos, CA
May 27, 2010
Bishop Peak 8/30

Yeah I was reading about that boy in my local newspaper the other day. While there is for sure a lot of personal desire and love of the mountains involved (i'm assuming), I think some of it might be for building up his own name. The reason for this is according to the newspaper, his next goal is to climb the highest 'peaks' in all 50 states. Walking through a farm on Kansas for an hour to get to the state's 'high point' seems anti-climactic for a kid who has summited Everest. But hey what do I know, maybe he just loves adventure and traveling. In any case, it's way cool that he got the chance to embark on such a climb at that age.


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By John Maguire
From Boulder, CO
May 27, 2010
Bastille Crack Final Pitch

I wish I had 50k :(


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By tenpins
May 28, 2010

I think you are missing where the kid has some legit mental fortitude. Arent 8000m peaks just an enduring misery fest? I realized when I was not much older then this kid that the misery involved in doing them was not what I was seeking.


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By Sunny-D
From SLC, Utah
May 28, 2010
Top of Jah-Man Sister Superior

My $.02
What are his parents thinking? I am pretty sure I wouldn't send my 13yr old kid off to climb Everest. That is a lot of risk for anyone let alone a 13 yr. old....


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By Andy Hansen
From Longmont, Colorado
May 28, 2010
Intruder, 5.11+. Zion National Park. Photo: Matt Kuehl

Summiting Everest is way better than X-Box. Video games are garbage. I'd let my kids summit mountains instead of drain their brains of valuable space.


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By Legs Magillicutty
From Littleton
May 28, 2010
Function over fashion.  My newest pair of climbing shoes.

I let my kids summit mountains and allow them to drain their brains of valuable space on occasion. It's all about balance. :-)

One thing is for sure, that kid is strong! It's going to be interesting to see what becomes of him in the mountaineering/climbing world as he grows up. Will he feed the flame or let it burn out?


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By Dirty Gri Gri, or is it GiGi?
From Vegas
May 28, 2010
Growing a winter coat in Red Rock Canyon- December 2013.

His Sherpa?




Disclaimer: That is soooo wrong!


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By Sunny-D
From SLC, Utah
May 28, 2010
Top of Jah-Man Sister Superior

Don't get me wrong I am chomping at the bit to take my little guy (almost 3) out climbing in the mountains I just think Everest is a bit much for 13.


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By matt davies
May 28, 2010

Sunny-D wrote:
Don't get me wrong I am chomping at the bit to take my little guy (almost 3) out climbing in the mountains I just think Everest is a bit much for 13.

It's interesting to see all these races to be the youngest to do something "extreme", Everest, 7 summits, sail alone around the world. But still if you let your kid roam around the block unattended, or ride a bike without more protection than Yeager wore when he broke the sound barrier, you risk a visit from social services.
Kudos to that kid, but don't we at some point have to give childhood back to children, and quit idealizing accomplishment for accomplishment's sake? He's 13 and been to the top of the world and back, its hard to believe he'll be able to live up to the expectations of future accomplishment this will foster.


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By Jason Himick
From Boulder, CO
May 28, 2010
Future Goal

That is so f*cking wrong... it's actually disturbing to watch.


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By tenpins
May 28, 2010

jim bridwell says smoking is training for altitude.


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By Woodchuck ATC
May 28, 2010
Rock Wars, RRG, 2008

matt davies wrote:
It's interesting to see all these races to be the youngest to do something "extreme", Everest, 7 summits, sail alone around the world. But still if you let your kid roam around the block unattended, or ride a bike without more protection than Yeager wore when he broke the sound barrier, you risk a visit from social services. Kudos to that kid, but don't we at some point have to give childhood back to children, and quit idealizing accomplishment for accomplishment's sake? He's 13 and been to the top of the world and back, its hard to believe he'll be able to live up to the expectations of future accomplishment this will foster.


Pushing the kids to set youth records is all wrong I agree. It was like over 10 years ago I think; I was skiing in terrible whiteout conditions in Colorado when that 7 yr. old girl trying to fly solo across America, crashed in those terrible conditions on take off from Cheyenne Wyoming. She and her dad both died, but he convinced her it was OK to try and fly that morning. That's the kind of shit that sucks, when parents get over involved for their own agenda.


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By Lee Smith
May 29, 2010
You can love your rope but you can't "LOVE" your rope! <br />(Back by Popular Demand.  There you are Mom) <br /> <br />

Actually Woodchuck, that was in April of 1996. Jessica Dubroff wasn't flying solo; you must be at least 16 to fly solo. The accident investigation pretty muched proved that she wasn't flying at the time of the accident. Joe Reid, the pilot-in-command was at the controls. The decision to fly was his, not the father's. The aircraft was almost surely overloaded and the weather was closing. Reid was also probably influenced by the schedule.

The bottom line is bad choices were made and three people died; one of them very young. But it wouldn't be an issue if the plane didn't crash. Jessica would be in the record books, get 15 minutes and then a 6-year-old would have to try it.

I really don't know if it is fair to blame the father in this case. People take their children on planes all the time; drive down the highway; smoke cigarettes nearby (or teach their kids to smoke -- very disturbing Gigi!). Life is a risk. Choices are made and sometimes they are wrong.

An interesting side note -- Jessica's birth mother sued the plane manufacturer. Utterly ridiculous.


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By Woodchuck ATC
May 29, 2010
Rock Wars, RRG, 2008

My mistake on the dad. Remember the overload, bad weather, poor choices, etc. I thought it was 'her' flight for the record as primary pilot(yes,not a solo). Long time ago and forgot alot of the details, but it does hang in my memory as a very sad day for aviation.


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By the Ascender
From . . . CO
May 29, 2010
My shadow is forcing me into the overhanging crux.

Whoa!
That was some serious hijack action Gri. . . hard to believe there is still talk about some 13 yo summitting an 8m.

That little turd is the coolio smoker I always wanted to be! Look at the smooth style - like James Bond, James Dean and James Earl Jones all rolled up into a fat little brown baby. Phenomenal!

True class that kiddo.


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By BrianH
From Santa Fe NM
Jul 12, 2010
Bob's Been to Joshua Tree!

I watched "Blindsight" recently.

www.blindsightthemovie.com/

At first I thought, this is pretty cool. But then I saw these kick azz mountaineers taking teenagers into the mountains for their own Western agenda. None of these kids had the skills, judgment or experience to be there, and their so-called "guides" had too much of their own agenda in it. Or so it seemed to me.

I dunno. I have been pretty heavily influenced by all the old expedition accounts (Five Miles High, Annapurna, the list is long...). But of course that world is long gone.

Want to get really sour on the whole 8000 metre game? Check out High Crimes: The Fate of Everest in an Age of Greed.

www.amazon.com/High-Crimes-Fate-Everest-Greed/dp/1401302734


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By Buff Johnson
Jul 12, 2010
smiley face

This all may be true but Denali is not for the mental incompetent.

anyone see this?

www.adn.com/2010/07/09/1360040/denali-rangers-airlift-paragl>>>


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By Owen Darrow
From Garmisch,
Sep 17, 2010
Nice view

A 13 year old kid should be sitting in school and waiting for breaks from school and college when he/she can explore mountains around their campus moving on to bigger mountains when THEY can afford it. Thats just me though...


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By superkick
From West Hartford, CT
Oct 11, 2011
Free Solo up hitchcock gully WI3

He didnt climb it, sherpas and guides set up ropes and took him to the top. Big deal.


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By EROCK22
Dec 6, 2011

I dont think anyone going on most of these guided Everest Trips are really climbing the mountain, watch any of the Everest documentaries and youll be hard pressed to find anyone with an ax in hand, only an ascender. the idea now is anyone with enough money in decent shape can climb the mountain with no real skill needed. one foot in front of the other in an elephant line. whats sad is the majority of the guides/outfitters are legends in their own who did actually contribute to the mountaineering world but are now abusing the mountain and ruining the game for most. id like to see the ropes removed and people going to Everest actually have a real resume under their harness. Everest is merely a high altitude hike these days! SAD.


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By M Sprague
Administrator
From New England
Dec 6, 2011
Lichen head. Me, with my usual weatherbeaten, lichen covered look from scrubbing a new route.

The Chinese should just build a tram to the top and be done with it.


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By Josh Kornish
Dec 6, 2011
The Roach

superkick wrote:
He didnt climb it, sherpas and guides set up ropes and took him to the top. Big deal.


I haven't read this entire thread but I was going to say the same thing. He didn't carry a single thing. He was aided beyond the point of real climbing.

It's the same using a jumar up a 5.15 and calling it sent. The kids lucky to have the funds and parents to hook him up for it.


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By Dr. Ellis D. Funnythoughts
From Evergreen, Co
Dec 6, 2011
You can tell Lenny any of your sport climbing problems. He's a great listener.

the kids a badass in my opinion. who cares if he didnt carry anything, or if their are fixed lines. the kid had an amazing opportunity and went for it. So what if his parents paid for it. I guarantee if anyone on this website had a free trip to everest they would go. To all the folks saying "shouldn't he be in school?" or "i wouldn't let my 13 yo do that." keep in mind, its not Your Kid.


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By APBT1976
Jan 9, 2012
Black Dike 12/25/11

ghey as hell "Everest these days" but good for the kid for real!!

I don't wanna take anything away from a kid but climbing Everest in the 50G"S fashion it is now climbed is not climbing period in my book. I am sure my 55 year old mother or 78 year old grandmother calls it climbing but it's all subjective to ones place on the couch ;)

Still at 13 no way in hell you woulda got me to commit to something like that for even one day even if someone did carry me up the dam mountain.


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By LIV
Jan 9, 2012
Kirk Couloir Challenger Peak

Kids that have friends that do this kind of stuff have a support system, someone they know that knows how cool it is. My kid thought it was super cool to have done +- 40 14ers until he reached age 13 or so. Then, because he didn't have any friends that knew how cool it was that he got 40 something 14ers by the time he was 13, he stopped doing it. He wants to be cool to his friends.

This kid - at age 15, had a good support system somehow, that kept him going to want to do these things. Some kids just have that in them (I've seen it in climbing comps, etc.) and some parent just have the way to motivate their kids. He wouldn't have done it if he didn't want to, and no parent could have made him do it at that age if he didn't want to do it on his own.

Yes, the parents had the cash - yes, he had the drive - yes, the Sherpas did the work - yes, he was able to wait for great weather on all of his peaks. That is an accomplishment. So, still, I don't think I would have taken my kid (they aren't old enough to make life altering decisions for themselves, in my opinion) -- but the parents could have turned back at any point and said it was a no-go (since they were with him).

So, cool, kudos to all of them.


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