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Dolomites Climbing Guides
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By winston
From Boulder, CO
Apr 21, 2008
napping with the dog, the best damn dog on earth.

Hello People of MP! I am going to Italy in about a month and I will be with my family, none of whom climb. I want to hit up the Dolomites for a few days while I'm there and was wondering if anyone new any good guiding companies out there that won't totally break my minuscule, post-college-graduate bank account. I know there is a lot of Via Feratta but I would rather do some free climbing (if I'm there I might as well right?). Thanks everyone for your input!


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By abc
Apr 21, 2008

winston wrote:
Hello People of MP! I am going to Italy in about a month and I will be with my family, none of whom climb. I want to hit up the Dolomites for a few days while I'm there and was wondering if anyone new any good guiding companies out there that won't totally break my minuscule, post-college-graduate bank account. I know there is a lot of Via Feratta but I would rather do some free climbing (if I'm there I might as well right?). Thanks everyone for your input!


Try Jorg Wilz with ontopmountaineering.com

He is a great guy.


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By Braxtron
From ...
Apr 21, 2008
Nearing the end of Escuelar de calor, a great route!

I've climbed near Arco and used the book Italian Rock by Al Churcher

There are many smaller crags that have their own books that are typically only sold near their respective crag (e.g. Stallavena ). Your best bet is to search rockclimbing.com (sorry!) for Italian climbers and contact them directly.


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By Seth Dee
From Denver, CO
Apr 21, 2008

Paolo Tassi of Gruppo Guide Alpine Cortina would be an excellent guide. No idea what he would cost

poltassi@libero.it

www.guidecortina.com/index.lasso?l=eng

Have fun!


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By Fat Dad
From Los Angeles, CA
Apr 21, 2008

Great place but the weather may be a little iffy in early June. I went for about 5 days in late June several years back, got three and a half clear days, and the locals commented on how nice the weather was for that time of year. You may want to try Michael Chessler for guidebooks. As far as guides, it'll help to know where in the Dolomites you're going before hiring someone.

If you can't actually climb, don't discount the fun value with the via ferrata.


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By brenta
From Boulder, CO
Apr 21, 2008
Cima Margherita and Cima Tosa in the Dolomiti di Brenta.  October 1977.

In Italy only certified guides can legally accompany customers. Guides belong to regional associations that decide a common fee structure. This fee structure may leave some room for negotiation in case of long, hard routes, but typically fixes the cost of a guide's services for trade routes. You are probably looking at about 250-300 euros for a mellow day of climbing and twice as much for a long, committing route. The client is also responsible for the cost of food, lodging, and transportation, both for him/herself and the guide.


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By winston
From Boulder, CO
Apr 21, 2008
napping with the dog, the best damn dog on earth.

You all ROCK! thanks for the great input!


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By Jonas D'Andrea
Apr 22, 2008

weak dollar = bank broken.

1 euro = $1.6


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By Michael Komarnitsky
Founding Father
From Seattle, WA
Apr 22, 2008
Myke Komarnitsky

mountainproject.com/v/international/italy/dolomites/10596716>>>

:-)


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By robb macgregor
From Point of Rocks, MD
Apr 22, 2008
Start of 3rd pitch of Ecstasy at Seneca Rocks, WV

I hired a guide from the South Tyrol at www.catores.com/. We climbed the First Sella Tower, Rosse Route, 6+ (5.10C) We visited in October. Climbing was cold w/dusting of snow. My guide was Lucas Pitzscheider. He did a great job! Climbing in the Dolomites varies a lot from textured to polished. What you can expect for limestone. Goodluck!

Robb


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By Tom Willard
Apr 22, 2008
Hitchhiking in Arches

I climbed the Vajolet Towers a couple of years ago with an excellent guide named Alberto Felicetti. He can be reached at www.guidealpinedolomiti.net or directly at matoberto@interfree.it. The climbing is fantastic, but the guides are expensive! Good Luck.


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By winston
From Boulder, CO
Apr 23, 2008
napping with the dog, the best damn dog on earth.

So, how much should I tentatively plan on spending for say...2 full days of climbing? As cheaply as possible (limited distance traveled, lodging etc.)


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By robb macgregor
From Point of Rocks, MD
Apr 23, 2008
Start of 3rd pitch of Ecstasy at Seneca Rocks, WV

It's been six years since we visited Italy. My guide cost me 350 euro's
for a six hour day. This was the off season (October). You can expect to pay at least 300-350 for a short day. It is better to plan for long days and budget $1000 for the experience. The price will go up as the commitment increases. Another option is to go sport climbing at Lake Garda. This area supposedly has great climbing. This was not an option for me. I can clip bolts anywhere. The Dolomite's are incredible, the people are nice and the scenery is fantastic. Enjoy!

Robb


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By Ed Wright
Apr 23, 2008
Magic Ed

I hate to tell you this but Italy right now will definitely break your miniscule bank account.


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By pierceadams
From Santa Fe NM
Apr 23, 2008

for a thousand dollars, I think i would just buy some more gear, plus a rope solo device like an ushba, and go rope soloing. spend the loot you save on the family and have a fun vacation. be safe, and have a good time.


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By Jonas D'Andrea
Apr 23, 2008

Yup. I haven't been since my honeymoon in June 2002, but I lived there in '95-'97 before the euro. The EU and euro standardization seemed to introduce Northern European prices to Southern Europe. Things were much more expensive in 2002 than when I lived there, though the only difference was going from lira to euro, and this was with the dollar at about 1 euro = $.95. Now with the dollar at its weakest in who know s how long (1 euro = $1.60), it's gonna be expensive.

That said the dolomites are fantastic. I climbed with my wife during our honeymoon. We spent 6 days in Canazei and did a 10 and 14 pitch on 2 different days, a via ferrata and some sight seeing there and over at cortina. The upside of all of this is that if you're traveling before mid/late June it will be low season on the mountains and you should not have any problems finding lodging (if they are open), and it should be at the low season rates. Great climbing shop in Canazei, where we got a guidebook and some beta. If cost is an issue you might try to hook up with some locals. Because it is low season you might be able to figure out a guide when you get there instead of booking in advance, I don't know. But with the rates quoted above, it sounds like $800-$1000 for 2 mellow days at the low end. Good luck and have fun.


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By Braxtron
From ...
Apr 23, 2008
Nearing the end of Escuelar de calor, a great route!

If you need affordable lodging in northern Italy (specifically Verona): lospite.com. The owner/operator, a friend of mine, is a wonderful person, and will bend over backwards to help you enjoy your stay in Italy. She's currently #1 on tripadvisor.com

Also, it's cheaper to fly into either Venice or Milan and take the train over to Verona. It's around 6 euros to ride from Venice to there, whereas it would have been something like 300 euros more to fly directly into Verona.

Tren Italia


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