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Does slacklining help your rock climbing?
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Jul 24, 2014
Rock Climbing Photo: Down low, before the Y and the Railroad couloirs s...
Does it help your climbing, or is it just really fun? Just curious about people's opinions on this. Tom Nyce
From Flagstaff, AZ
Joined Nov 16, 2010
46 points
Jul 24, 2014
Yes. GhaMby
From Heaven
Joined Oct 2, 2006
427 points
Jul 24, 2014
no. Jonathan Petsch
From Chattanooga, TN
Joined Nov 24, 2007
53 points
Jul 24, 2014
Rock Climbing Photo:
i think it helps a lot with overall balance kind of stuff. I've been slack lining for two years and i find it helpful on those blank granite slabs. Theres a lot of those kinda climbs around me and balance is a key factor in that style. (all the slabs are at like a 40-70 degrees) Chase Bowman
From Baton Rouge
Joined Jan 27, 2014
470 points
Administrator
Jul 24, 2014
Rock Climbing Photo: tomato, tomotto, kill mike amato.
i don't see how the balance required in slacklining would really have much crossover for climbing. maybe skiing, but not so much climbing. slim
Joined Dec 1, 2004
2,149 points
Jul 24, 2014
Rock Climbing Photo: City of Rocks
Dynamic balance not usually required I'm thinking, since the rock doesn't usually move...usually. Hiro
From Colorado
Joined Apr 2, 2012
506 points
Jul 24, 2014
I have found that from slack lining, I have a better sense of balance when I am climbing. Aka peeling off has went down a lot since I started slack lining. CorbinW
Joined Jul 31, 2012
131 points
Jul 24, 2014
Rock Climbing Photo: Me
No. Neither does yoga. Climbing, sport specific training, and weight loss will help your climbing. Ryan Palo
From Bend, oregon
Joined Aug 18, 2006
637 points
Jul 24, 2014
I think it has helped my climbing a lot. You really have to focus and that for me is what is really helpful. I noticed that after I was up to walking 50' and longer lines, my wheels spun a lot less when I was running it out. I think slack lining, yoga or anything that forces you to be calm, focused, aware of your breath and center of balance is fantastic for climbing. Especially for people like me, who find the mental game is more challenging than the physical aspects. Ashley A
From Salt Lake City
Joined Nov 9, 2006
5 points
Jul 24, 2014
Ashley A wrote:
I think it has helped my climbing a lot. You really have to focus and that for me is what is really helpful. I noticed that after I was up to walking 50' and longer lines, my wheels spun a lot less when I was running it out. I think slack lining, yoga or anything that forces you to be calm, focused, aware of your breath and center of balance is fantastic for climbing. Especially for people like me, who find the mental game is more challenging than the physical aspects.


I've really never done much slack lining. But the above reasoning is pretty sensible. Basically meditation.

I'm with the poster, even when I was very strong (for me), I found leading was entirely bottlenecked by the mental aspects, if her rationale is legit, it can't hurt.
J. Serpico
From Saratoga County, NY
Joined Dec 16, 2009
166 points
Jul 24, 2014
I read a book that said "no." Or at least "not much, your time can be better spent doing other kinds of more useful training." Pontoon
From Minneapolis, Minnesota
Joined Jan 18, 2014
75 points
Jul 24, 2014
Rock Climbing Photo: Deep in a slot canyon, somewhere on the colorado p...
I have found it best helps with beer drinking, once you combine the two. portercassidy
From UT/CO
Joined Nov 4, 2006
68 points
Administrator
Jul 25, 2014
No, although highlining can help with your lead head. 20 kN
From Hawaii
Joined Feb 2, 2009
1,052 points
Jul 25, 2014
Rock Climbing Photo: Cathedral Peak!
No, but it will help your hacky sacking Simon W
From Salt Lake City, UT
Joined May 18, 2013
101 points
Administrator
Jul 25, 2014
Does doing an Ironman help with climbing? What about becoming a 7th degree black belt in Taekwondo? How about becoming a Marine MARSOC operator? 20 kN
From Hawaii
Joined Feb 2, 2009
1,052 points
Jul 25, 2014
Rock Climbing Photo: Climbing on Kum Laude
20 kN wrote:
Does doing an Ironman help with climbing?


No, because it will destroy your relationship with your climbing partner (and life partner potentially) as you spend all your time training for the fucking thing.

20 kN wrote:
What about becoming a 7th degree black belt in Taekwondo?


Yes, because you will be able to kick the shit outta anybody who tries to steal your gear and/or first ascents.

20 kN wrote:
How about becoming a Marine MARSOC operator?


No, because your ass will become fat from sitting operating the thing. (I think, since I have no idea what a MARSOC is, and am too lazy to google it)
David Morgantini
From London, United Kingdom
Joined Jul 2, 2014
5 points
Jul 25, 2014
David Morgantini wrote:
No, because your ass will become fat from sitting operating the thing. (I think, since I have no idea what a MARSOC is, and am too lazy to google it)


From this, marsoc.com/ it does not appear that the primary health risk is obesity.
Optimistic
From New Paltz
Joined Aug 29, 2007
328 points
Jul 25, 2014
The one physical application of slacklining (mental game aside) that I felt helped my climbing is the ability to stand up with only one point of contact. Doing a sit-start on a slackline and standing up on one leg. Think high stepping and being able stand and completely extend your leg without the help of your hands. There is a bit of core strength and muscle memory necessary to keep your leg from shaking in order to pull off this move. T Howes
From Sisters, OR
Joined Dec 13, 2010
12 points
Jul 25, 2014
Slacklining improves my footwork. I feel like I'm a lot more controlled and precise while climbing if I have been slacklining. J. Kincaid
Joined Sep 6, 2013
6 points
Jul 25, 2014
Rock Climbing Photo: me
so, when you boil it all down, the answer is: yes and no george wilkey
From travelers rest sc
Joined Jan 23, 2013
258 points
Jul 25, 2014
Rock Climbing Photo: Eastern Bloc slab.
Ryan Palo wrote:
No. Neither does yoga. Climbing, sport specific training, and weight loss will help your climbing.


Exactly. You will get absolutely no skill transfer to climbing from some other activity that is not climbing. Plain and simple. Many training for climbing books talk about this in detail. Sport specfic training and some weight loss will improve performance, but the only way to get better at the specific skill sets required in climbing rock is to climb rock.
Jfaub
From Ottawa, On
Joined Jun 15, 2014
811 points
Jul 25, 2014
Rock Climbing Photo: OTL
Climbing helps my slacklining.







^not true - I don't slackline.
Matt N
From Santa Barbara, CA
Joined Oct 20, 2010
378 points
Jul 25, 2014
Ryan Palo wrote:
No. Neither does yoga. Climbing, sport specific training, and weight loss will help your climbing.

While that is mostly true, we've all seen people crossed over from a different discipline who are extremely good at certain aspects of climbing, in fact, probably as good or better than the very elite climbers. Which is to say, while a large portion of climbing performance is very specific to the sport, there is a portion that may not get exercised very much just thru climbing, especially if you've already adopted a style or even route preferences that under emphasizes those aspects. But if you are very bad at them (and there are plenty of climbers w/ pretty horrible deficiencies but can climb really hard grades by virtue of having really strong fingers), it may not be a bad idea to pick up something else.

IMO, current climbing training literature is pretty deficient in that non-sport specific 20-30%; it's like everyone just wants to sweep them under the rug. Having a strong martial arts background before climbing, I get pretty frustrated when trying to help climbers (that have had little exposure to other sports) w/ certain strength & power deficiencies (some are affecting joint health). I don't want to tell them to practice martial arts or gymnastics, but there aren't any climbing training materials that specifically address these issues.
reboot
From Westminster, CO
Joined Jul 17, 2006
163 points
Jul 25, 2014
Rock Climbing Photo: Hittin' Miguel's with the new Chimps in tow
george wilkey wrote:
so, when you boil it all down, the answer is: yes and no


This. All of you pointing out the training research...that is for elite athletes. Few elite athletes post on MP.com, IMHO. The better question for the thread is: up to what level of [trad/sport/alpine/bouldering] will slack lining be beneficial. I believe that for many, many 5.9-5.11 climbers, especially in areas where vertical or slab terrain are common, slack lining could be very beneficial. For someone who climbs in the 5.12-5.13 range at the RRG? Doubtful. For Megos or Ondra? Doubtful. For someone just starting out who doesn't even know that they have feet? Doubtful.
Matt Roberts
From Columbus, OH
Joined Mar 24, 2010
97 points
Aug 12, 2016
I don't agree that slacklining doesn't improve climbing skills. I climb around 5.11 and realized that my slacklining techniques really helped me to find better balance and core stability in climbing. Especially when I started to slack distances about 100m and Highlining I felt more confident and precise in my climbing movements than ever before. But: If you try to achieve 100m+ slacklines forget about ratchets and primitive setups. You will need a serious pulley system like this: raed-slacklines.com/pro-longli...
In my opinion slacklining really helped me with my mental game. The exposure of highlining nearly completely took my fears when climbing bigwalls and the ability to calm down and breathe precisely helped me to focus in crux parts of routes. Plus: I learned how to move and balance on slabs where you always need to push from the legs and keep in balance. Slacklining really helped me to achieve this abilities.
Mortin
Joined Aug 12, 2016
0 points
Aug 12, 2016
Rock Climbing Photo: I pity the fool
I agree with Simon. It will also help with juggle sticks, circle drumming, Frisbee golf and weed.

I had one in my backyard for a while. It helped kill the grass near it and it helped with getting my balls wacked with a taut nylon webbing.

I never thought it helped my climbing.
Ray Lovestead
From Boulder, CO
Joined Jan 9, 2008
137 points


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